Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 8289 result(s) returned

3.6.2 Resonant frequency

There are two very good reasons for wanting the resonant frequency of the AFM cantilever to be as high as possible: to minimise the effect of vibrations from the surroundings, and to obtain a high image acquisition rate. Given the very high resolution of the measurements they are intended for, atomic force microscopes are bound to be susceptible to the effects of air movements and vibrations in the buildings where they are sited. Building vibrations are most significant in a frequency range f
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

The Economist asks: What are the economics of art?
Are the new players in the art world opening it up or destroying it? Economist Richard Davies profiles one dealer accused of creating turmoil in the market. Also on the show: Artist Schandra Singh ponders the intricate relationship between art and money. And senior director at the auction house Sotheby's, Philip Hook, on the dealers who made art history. Anne McElvoy hosts.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Mixed reviews on the war in Iraq
Dec. 14 - As the last U.S. troops prepare to leave Iraq after almost nine years, residents grow restless with the slow pace of development. Deborah Lutterbeck reports.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to c
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

British prime ministers 1783 - 1852
To access this learning object you should copy and paste this link into a browser: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~cczjrt/pm/ The 'view resource' link on the right handside of this page is not currently working. This learning object on British Prime Ministers, 1783-1852, is designed to support the programme of lectures and seminars on the module The Many Faces of Reform: British politics, 1790-1850. It will help familiarise you with the leading political figures and parliamentary groupings of t
Author(s): Gaunt Richard Dr;Tenney Julian;Huskinson Sandra

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by

#280: Deferring dementia: Research efforts to keep Alzheimer’s at bay

Neurobiologist Prof Colin Masters explains current medical understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, and discusses ongoing research efforts towards delaying onset of this as yet incurable condition. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.

Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

License information
Related content

Rights not set

WTCB : Online informatie bouwsector
wtcb.PNG

Website met informatie en ondersteuning voor bouwberoepen, waarbij onderzoek, ontwikkeling en innovatie de drie hoofdopdrachten zijn.

Om deze opdrachten te vervullen, steunt het WTCB op de kennis en de ervaring van hooggeschoolde en gemotiveerde …


Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

3.5.1 Contact mode

Contact mode produces images with the highest resolution. This is because when the probe tip is as close as it can be to the surface, the influence of atoms other than the one directly under the probe tip is relatively small. This is a simple geometrical effect – if the tip were withdrawn a large distance from the surface, a large number of atoms would be at a very similar distance from the tip, and therefore would have a similar contribution to the overall force. In contact mode, the repul
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.1.1 Ron revisited

In Case Report 1 you met Ron. Ron is 59 years old, has a BMI of 31 and a central obesity ratio of 0.96, indicating that he is moderately obese, with the fat concentrated in his abdomen, rather than his hips. Clearly a number of factors, some environmental, others relating to Ron's age and all interacting with Ron's genetic constitution, may help to provide an explanation. Let's look at some of these factors in a little more detail. It is clear that Ron enjoys a comfortable lifestyle with litt
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

3.4 What has any of this to do with computers?

Human beings invented computers because we have a compelling interest in data. We seek to turn our perceptions of sensations into symbols, and then to store, analyse, process, and turn these symbols into something else: information. Modern computers, with their enormous storage capacity and incredible processing power, are an ideal tool for doing this. They allow us to acquire data, code it in terms of signs, store, retrieve, or combine it with other data. Sophisticated o
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • Explain the reasons for earthquakes

  • Understand where in the world earthquakes are most likely to occur

  • Describe the potential consequences of an earthquake

  • Differentiate between earthquake intensity and earthquake magnitude

  • Appreciate the enormous energies released by earthquakes.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Parliamentary Crisis: 1832 and 2009
In the current Parliamentary crisis commentators are invoking the historical context and calling for a new 'Great Reform Act' to clean up politics. But what was Parliament like before 1832? Is the discussion on the behaviour of MPs unprecedented?
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

1.1.3 Introduction continued

The difficulty perhaps is that things which happen at some distance from the everyday routine of our lives are often hard to place or connect with. Moreover, it has to be said that not everyone views factory sweatshops in quite the same way as groups such as Oxfam, or indeed endorses their negative claims about the use of cheap labour in places such as East Asia. For that is what the statements of such groups are: claims. And they are far from uncontroversial.

In fact, it is poss
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Tracing the origins of the HIV/AIDS pandemic
Nuno Fario (Oxford) investigates the development of HIV since the discovery of its first, and diverse, genomes in 1959 and 1960. A medical anthropology seminar given on 7 March 2016.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

The Economist asks: What does the past tell us about power today?
Anne McElvoy is joined by author Robert Harris to delve into power and intrigue from the Labour party to the Vatican.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Larry Sass - 640x480
Description not set
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

#263: Sequencing seizures: Discovering new genetic mutations behind epilepsy

Neurologist Prof Sam Berkovic and molecular geneticist Prof David Goldstein describe their work uncovering chance mutations that cause childhood epilepsy. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.