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2.3 What's so difficult?

Morgan's discussion helps us to think about how we can develop research, policies and interventions around ‘family’ when the key term is so problematic. But we also need to explore further just what is so difficult about this endeavour. There are also some clues to this in Morgan's discussion, in which he points out that:

  • there is a close linkage between everyday and academic language of family

  • there is a whole variety of a
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1.4 Structures of power & inequalities

At the same time, such judgements and responses are not just personal matters: they are also embedded in all sorts of wider and interpersonal processes of power and inequality. These processes shape social policies, professional interventions, and representations in the media, as well as underpinning everyday social interactions in family lives and relationships. If we focus on family meanings, we may not always put issues of power, material inequalities, and moral evaluations at the centre o
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • demonstrate a critical understanding of the concept of ’ (knowledge and understanding)

  • engage with and review debates about selected key concepts relevant to the study of families and personal relationships

  • identify connections between concepts and the themes they raise for research and for social policy

  • understand some of the social processes underlying research around family issue
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Introduction

One of the most fascinating and productive ways of using your computer for study is connecting to the internet to access the extensive amount of information available on the web. Such a diverse range of material brings its own challenges.

It's therefore useful to know how to search effectively. Have a look at our Web Guide (accessed 8 November 2006).

The BBC's Webwise online course (accessed 8 November 2006) will also help you become a confident web user.

This
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4.8 Not everyone is participating

It can be annoying if there are some people in your tutor group who don't participate in discussions. You may feel that this is unfair, or that you are doing more than your fair share of the work.

There's often a minority of people who don't join in at all, for a variety of reasons – pressure of personal circumstances, illness, shyness, or deliberate decision. And different people may be at different stages in the course. A benefit of studying online is that you can fit your studying
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4.2 Why online conferencing is useful

Online conferencing can make a big difference by making you feel part of the learning community, connecting to other students and keeping you motivated. It's a help to know that other people are struggling with the same issues as you, and that you can share problems and ideas at any time of day or night.

It's also a good way for students to work together, rather than individually. Group working is becoming an important element of many courses, partly because it is increasingly the way t
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3.1 Introduction

One of the most useful and rewarding things you can do with your computer is use it to communicate with your tutor, other students, and course staff.

If you like exchanging ideas and information, sharing support with other students, asking questions and getting feedback from your tutor, then online communication can add a whole new dimension to your learning:

“Email from another student really kept me going
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3.1.4 Option 4: Challenging and adapting diagrams

In this option, we take a diagram from the source material and either adapt it or challenge what it is trying to tell the reader. This is fine and indicates a thinking approach to the assignment. There is one golden rule: ‘State clearly that this is what you are doing!’ This is important for two reasons: first, the courtesy of acknowledging your sources, even if you have significantly adapted the diagram, and second, to demonstrate that you have studied the material carefully and produced
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1.1 Why write?

Of all aspects of studying, writing is probably the most challenging. That is because when you write down an account of your ideas for other people to read you have to explain yourself particularly carefully. You can't make the mental leaps you do when you are in conversation with others or thinking about something for yourself. To make your meaning clear, using only words on a page, you have to work out exactly what you think about the subject. You come to understand it for yourself i
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1.7.3 Differentiating dyslexia from other developmental conditions

While dyslexia is distinctive, there are other developmental syndromes that often co-occur with it. Examples include:

  • developmental dysphasia – specific difficulties with spoken language

  • attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder – involving particular problems with concentration and/or behaviour

  • developmental dyspraxia – developmental coordination disorder.

Developmental dysphasia

Developm
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2.5 ‘Difference’ and identity

If differences on the basis of gender, ethnicity and disability are socially constructed, how should people view their identities, for example as men, or disabled people, or people of African–Caribbean origin? Where do such identities come from, and how useful are they in explaining people's experience of communication in care services?

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1.2.2 How do others find meaning in life?

There are those who share Tolstoy’s view that death is an end rather than a transition, and yet are much more optimistic about life. Hermann Bondi represents the views of many Humanists in the following passage:

As a Humanist I believe in the importance of human linkages, of human interactions, of our lives getting their meaning from our connections with each other. Thus I agree with Donne that anybody’s death
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Force and Strategy
This course examines the political, economic,military, and ethical factors affecting the use and utility of military force in international relations. Students will study the political and decision-making process by which nations decide to use military force as well as the major arms control agreements of the post-World War II period, including negotiations currently under way.
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International Multilateral Negotiation
The seminar focuses on negotiated decision-making in multilateral settings. It will survey process issues such as: the differences between bilateral and multilateral negotiations, the particular problems of negotiations involving a very large number of parties, the complexities of issue-linkage, managed negotiation processes, the role of coalitions, conference diplomacy, treaty negotiations, knowledge in negotiation, etc. These topics will be discussed in the context of case studies dealing with
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Elections: pre-match report
A tense election period is looming with certain MPs refusing to pay back expenses and some already announcing that they intend to stand down.In this podcast Professor Steven Fielding weighs up the main parties and asks if they're fighting fit.
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Tsunami Attack!
Students learn about tsunamis, discovering what causes them and what makes them so dangerous. They learn that engineers design detection and warning equipment, as well as structures that that can survive the strong wave forces. In a hands-on activity, students use a table-top-sized tsunami generator to observe the formation and devastation of a tsunami. They see how a tsunami moves across the ocean and what happens when it reaches a coastline. They make villages of model houses to test how diffe
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Land on the Run
Students learn about landslides, discovering that there are different types of landslides that occur at different speeds from very slow to very quick. All landslides are the result of gravity, friction and the materials involved. Both natural and human-made factors contribute to landslides. Students learn what makes landslides dangerous and what engineers are doing to prevent and avoid landslides.
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Soapy Stress
To experience the three types of material stress related to rocks tensional, compressional and shear students break bars of soap using only their hands. They apply force created by the muscles in their own hands to put pressure on the soap, a model for the larger scale, real-world phenomena that forms, shapes and moves the rocks of our planet. They also learn the real-life implications of understanding stress in rocks, both for predicting natural hazards and building safe structures.
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Floodplain Modeling
Students explore the impact of changing river volumes and different floodplain terrain in experimental trials with table top-sized riverbed models. The models are made using modeling clay in an aluminum baking pans placed on a slight incline. Water added "upstream" at different flow rates and to different riverbed configurations simulates different potential flood conditions. Students study flood dynamics as they modify the riverbed with blockages or levees to simulate real-world scenarios.
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