From Blair to Brown
Professor Wyn Grant looks at the transition from Tony Blair to Gordon Brown.
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Kosovo independence; a threat to Balkan stability?
What are the implications of an independent Kosovo for security in the Balkans?
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Public Bailout of Bank’s Recklessness
In response to the ongoing sub-prime crisis, the recently published Crosby Report recommends that the Government uses public money to swap bank’s seriously damaged mortgage-backed securities for pristine government bonds. Matthew Watson from the Department of Politics and International Studies at Warwick University talks about these recommendations, and how the global ‘credit crunch’ is affecting Labour’s popularity with the electorate.
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International Political Economy Debate - Part One
A Politics and International Studies department debate on IPE with Mark Blyth, Shirin M Rai, Dr Matthew Watson and Dr Jeffrey Chwieroth. Listen to Part Two
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International Political Economy Debate - Part Two
A Politics and International Studies department debate on IPE with Mark Blyth, Shirin M Rai, Dr Matthew Watson and Dr Jeffrey Chwieroth.
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Professor Wyn Grant Discusses UK Election Politics
In the year of a General Election, Professor Wyn Grant from the Department of Politics and International Studies discusses the complexities of UK election politics
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Warwick and Boston Partnership
Warwick's Professor Wyn Grant and Boston University's Professor Graham Wilson discuss Politics and the Financial Crisis along with the research collaboration and partnership between the two institutions.
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IAS Visiting Fellow Professor Vivien Schmidt from Boston University speaks at the Warwick RIPE debat
The Department of Politics and International Studies hosted the third annual Warwick RIPE Debate in IPE in collaboration with the Review of International Political Economy. The main speaker at the 2010 debate was Professor Vivien Schmidt of Boston University. She spoke on the theme of 'The Fall, Rise, Fall and Rise of the State within Modern Capitalism - and how to explain it'. The debate was chaired by the Head of PaIS, Professor Ben Rosamond. Additional speakers were two other hugely influ
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IAS Visiting Fellow Professor Vivien Schmidt from Boston University speaks to PAIS PhD students Andr
Warwick PhD students Andrew Hammond and Ben Jacoby from the Department of Politics and International Studies interview IAS Visiting Fellow Professor Vivien Schmidt about her research in political theory, the role of the state and democracy in Europe. Professor Schmidt also explains her search for better methodological approaches to studying politics focussing on the interactive processes of discourse.
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Boston University's Prof Cathie Jo Martin talks to Warwick's Prof Wyn Grant about her research in th
IAS Visiting Fellow Prof Cathie Jo Martin, Professor of Political Science at Boston University and chair of the Council for European Studies talks to the University of Warwick's Professor Wyn Grant about her research and new book which focuses on the origins of coordinated capitalism and the circumstances under which employers are persuaded to endorse social policies, promoting economic productivity and social solidarity.
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5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering (MIT)

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17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT)

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

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17.951 Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: Past, Present and Future (MIT)
This course will expose students to tools and methods of analysis for use in assessing the challenges and dangers associated with nuclear weapons in international politics. The first two weeks of the course will look at the technology and design of nuclear weapons and their means of production. The next five weeks will look at the role they played in the Cold War, the organizations that managed them, the technologies that were developed to deliver them, and the methods used to analyze nuclear fo
Author(s): Owen Cote,James Walsh

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)
An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

21W.747 Classical Rhetoric and Modern Political Discourse (MIT)
This course is an introduction to the history, theory, practice, and implications of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion throughAnalyzing persuasive texts and speechesCreating persuasive texts and speechesThrough class discussions, presentations, and written assignments, you will get to practice your own rhetorical prowess. Through the readings, you'll also learn some ways to make yourself a more efficient reader, as you turn your analytical skills on the texts themselves. This combination
Author(s): Leslie Perelman

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The Politics of Climate Change: Problems and Solutions
Lord Anthony Giddens gives the opening keynote address to the Oxford Climate Forum, talking about the politics of climate change.
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Social Media, So What? Assessing the Impact of Blogs and Social Media
Can Web 2.0 tools (eg blogs, social networking and wikis) enhance our democratic freedoms? Or can we dismiss the socially egalitarian and politically democratic potential of these social media? Have any significant social impacts been ignored so far? Theorists such as Yochai Benkler have suggested that the accessibility and inherently social nature of Web 2.0 tools such as blogs, social networking and wikis mean that we might expect them to enhance our democratic freedoms through the opening of
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