British prime ministers 1783 - 1852
To access this learning object you should copy and paste this link into a browser: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~cczjrt/pm/ The 'view resource' link on the right handside of this page is not currently working. This learning object on British Prime Ministers, 1783-1852, is designed to support the programme of lectures and seminars on the module The Many Faces of Reform: British politics, 1790-1850. It will help familiarise you with the leading political figures and parliamentary groupings of t
Author(s): Gaunt Richard Dr;Tenney Julian;Huskinson Sandra

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#280: Deferring dementia: Research efforts to keep Alzheimer’s at bay

Neurobiologist Prof Colin Masters explains current medical understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, and discusses ongoing research efforts towards delaying onset of this as yet incurable condition. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.

Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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WTCB : Online informatie bouwsector
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Website met informatie en ondersteuning voor bouwberoepen, waarbij onderzoek, ontwikkeling en innovatie de drie hoofdopdrachten zijn.

Om deze opdrachten te vervullen, steunt het WTCB op de kennis en de ervaring van hooggeschoolde en gemotiveerde …


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3.4 What has any of this to do with computers?

Human beings invented computers because we have a compelling interest in data. We seek to turn our perceptions of sensations into symbols, and then to store, analyse, process, and turn these symbols into something else: information. Modern computers, with their enormous storage capacity and incredible processing power, are an ideal tool for doing this. They allow us to acquire data, code it in terms of signs, store, retrieve, or combine it with other data. Sophisticated o
Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • Explain the reasons for earthquakes

  • Understand where in the world earthquakes are most likely to occur

  • Describe the potential consequences of an earthquake

  • Differentiate between earthquake intensity and earthquake magnitude

  • Appreciate the enormous energies released by earthquakes.


Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Hagel defends swap of Taliban for war prisoner
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says exceptional circumstances led to Washington's decision to swap five Taliban leaders to win the release of Army war prisoner Bowe Bergdahl. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe More updates and breaking news: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including
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Parliamentary Crisis: 1832 and 2009
In the current Parliamentary crisis commentators are invoking the historical context and calling for a new 'Great Reform Act' to clean up politics. But what was Parliament like before 1832? Is the discussion on the behaviour of MPs unprecedented?
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1.1.3 Introduction continued

The difficulty perhaps is that things which happen at some distance from the everyday routine of our lives are often hard to place or connect with. Moreover, it has to be said that not everyone views factory sweatshops in quite the same way as groups such as Oxfam, or indeed endorses their negative claims about the use of cheap labour in places such as East Asia. For that is what the statements of such groups are: claims. And they are far from uncontroversial.

In fact, it is poss
Author(s): The Open University

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Tracing the origins of the HIV/AIDS pandemic
Nuno Fario (Oxford) investigates the development of HIV since the discovery of its first, and diverse, genomes in 1959 and 1960. A medical anthropology seminar given on 7 March 2016.
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The Economist asks: What does the past tell us about power today?
Anne McElvoy is joined by author Robert Harris to delve into power and intrigue from the Labour party to the Vatican.
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Dach blog
Dach is a blog which keeps readers updated on the British Library's German collections. It also discusses wider issues connected with German, Austrian and German Swiss culture, politics and literature. The authors - Clemens Gresser, Susan Reed and Dorothea Miehe - are all librarians at the British Library. Some blog postings also give a more personal perspective on issues relating to German culture and everyday work issues. For example, a recent post talked about German elections and how the
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Larry Sass - 640x480
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Fluid Dynamics of Drag part 4
Fluid Dynamics of Drag part 4
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#263: Sequencing seizures: Discovering new genetic mutations behind epilepsy

Neurologist Prof Sam Berkovic and molecular geneticist Prof David Goldstein describe their work uncovering chance mutations that cause childhood epilepsy. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.