Epiphany
For more information please visit http://www.leedsmet.ac.uk Music by http://www.incompetech.com To find out more about joining Epiphany, including the agency's Graduate Scheme, please visit www.epiphanysearch.co.uk or email jobs@epiphanysolutions.co.uk
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Liberty`s Kids: "The Intolerable Acts"
This video gives a good fictional account of the Intolerable Acts. Taxation, Boston, Ben Franklin, Red Coats, and Tea Party all all key words discussed in this video. This is a wonderful teaching resource for a unit on the history of the US. It certainly helps to build background knowledge on lifestyle, clothing, transportation, etc. during colonial times (10:51).
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6.3 Heat research

Andrew Plummer (c. 1698–1756), the chemistry professor at Edinburgh, suffered a stroke in 1755, and the Town Council appointed Cullen as his conjoint professor without consulting the stricken Plummer. Black, who had covered for Plummer until Cullen arrived, was appointed to Cullen's position at the University of Glasgow. This move also marked a change in the direction of Black's research. He now began to investigate the nature of heat, a central topic in eighteenth-century chemistry.
Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

6.2.14 E-learning

This term is used to describe companies or organisations who offer educational courses via the web. The quality and features found in sites which can be described by this business model can vary. At its simplest such sites offer students the ability to download conventional texts. More complex instantiations of the model offer the students facilities to read individual lessons, try out online multiple choice questions and experience simulations relevant to the topic being taught.


Author(s): The Open University

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21A.453 Anthropology of the Middle East (MIT)
This course examines traditional performances of the Arabic-speaking populations of the Middle East and North Africa. Starting with the history of the ways in which the West has discovered, translated and written about the Orient, we will consider how power and politics play roles in the production of culture, narrative and performance. This approach assumes that performance, verbal art, and oral literature lend themselves to spontaneous adaptation and to oblique expression of ideas and opinions
Author(s): Slyomovics, Susan

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6.1 Introduction

Whatever else they may be, religions grow in historical and social settings. The present form of a religion has its roots in the past. Religion can exercise a strong influence upon society and the cultural forms of a society, but religion itself is no less affected by changes and pressures within society. Religion gives meaning to a pattern of living and may even be responsible for establishing a certain lifestyle or distinctive social organisation or institution. At the same time, religion o
Author(s): The Open University

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Volcanic Activity: Vesuvius Buries Pompeii
Vesuvius' Eruption That Buried Pompeii - Vesuvius' most early eruption, is now its most famous. (01:24)
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IPL: Jonathan Waters "Discovering prehistoric New Zealand"
Professor Jon Water's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 6th of August 2013. Jon talks about genetics and how DNA can be used to map extinction and recolonization - for plants as well as animals. He talks about populations of freshwater galaxiids that have been separated by geological events, and about prehistoric sealions and penguins that became extinct with human colonisation, and how new populations have then taken the place of those prehistoric species.
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Using Alphabet Sound Charts
In this video you will learn how to use alphabet sound charts to teach kids to read through homeschooling or tutoring.  Expert, Matt Nisjak, shows how to use these alphabet sound charts for doing some alphabet chants that kids love to use to learn the sounds.
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American Woman
Securing the right to vote was a major milestone for women in America. As we approach Women's History Month, we consider a controversial painting in our collections that commented on the rights of 19th century women in politics and society. Its title is American Woman and Her Political Peers.
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Through the Network (of Networks): The Fifth Estate
The Internet and web are creating a new space for networking people, information and other resources: this has the potential to become an important 'fifth estate' to support greater accountability in politics, the media and other institutional arenas.
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Understanding global politics
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module introduces global politics through the major theoretical, historical and empirical ways of seeing international relations. Different claims, about, for example, human nature, power, war, peace, the state, society, law and politics are offered by thinkers who exercise a major influence on our contemporary understanding. These claims contribute to different approaches t
Author(s): Carey Sabine Dr;Zhang Xiaoke Dr;Pupavac Vanessa Dr

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Living in an era of global terror
In this podcast, Professor Richard Aldrich from the School of Politics and International Relations, discusses the impact of globalisation, the opportunities this affords to global terrorists and the challenges faced by the intelligence services. Globalisation has led to a free flow of money, people and ideas, which has benefited many people in the West in recent years and enhanced our standard of living, but the price paid is a reduction in security. As we see a shift towards a de-regulated glo
Author(s): Aldrich Richard Professor

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Economist's Christmas
What do you really want for the holidays? And how can you be sure you’re giving the perfect gift to someone else? Of course, you want to get your loved ones something they will appreciate, but you face a knowledge problem: you don’t know everything about their wants and needs. (05:21)

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Politics in 60 seconds. The Labour Party
Professor Steven Fielding defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on the labour party. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor Steven Fielding, School of Politics and International Relations Professor Steven Fielding is Professor of Political History and Director of the Centre for British Politics: CBP at The University of Notti
Author(s): Fielding S. J. Professor

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I. Glenn Cohen: Patients with Passports || Radcliffe Institute
As one of the world's leading experts on the intersection of bioethics and the law, I. Glenn Cohen spent a year as a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University writing Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics (under contract with Oxford University Press), the first comprehensive analysis of the legal and ethical issues raised by medical tourism. Cohen is a professor at Harvard Law School, where he is also a codirector of the Petrie-Flom Center fo
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The World In 2017 Special: Invention
Part one of a three part series: Anne McElvoy and World In editor Daniel Franklin look ahead to 2017. Former head of Google China Kai Fu Lee and Didi President Jean Liu share their thoughts on what the future holds for Chinese tech, while Elizabeth Arden President JuE Wong makes her predictions for the year to come. Also: is a golden age of dealmaking in American business coming to an end? And what do the next 12 months mean for the climate?
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IAS Visiting Fellow Professor Vivien Schmidt from Boston University speaks at the Warwick RIPE debat
The Department of Politics and International Studies hosted the third annual Warwick RIPE Debate in IPE in collaboration with the Review of International Political Economy. The main speaker at the 2010 debate was Professor Vivien Schmidt of Boston University. She spoke on the theme of 'The Fall, Rise, Fall and Rise of the State within Modern Capitalism - and how to explain it'. The debate was chaired by the Head of PaIS, Professor Ben Rosamond. Additional speakers were two other hugely influ
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21A.260 Culture, Embodiment and the Senses (MIT)
Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses will provide an historical and cross-cultural analysis of the politics of sensory experience. The subject will address western philosophical debates about mind, brain, emotion, and the body and the historical value placed upon sight, reason, and rationality, versus smell, taste, and touch as acceptable modes of knowing and knowledge production. We will assess cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philo
Author(s): James, Erica

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What chance for peace in Sri Lanka?
The recent resumption of violence in Sri Lanka between the Tamil Tigers and Government forces has set back hopes that a peaceful settlement could be established in this long running conflict. Miranda Alison of Warwick's Department of Politics and International Studies provides an insight into the history of the conflict and examines whether a resolution is likely in the near future. Length: 23 minutes
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