Introduction

The material presented here focuses on the politics of racial violence in Britain. The material is an audio file, originally 30 minutes in length, and examines the issues around this subject. It was recorded in 1995.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 2 study in Sociology.


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Introduction

In this course I look at a number of different programming and design styles associated with distributed system development. The course first examines message passing and the role of protocols – both fixed and adaptive protocols. Two styles of message passing are also examined: synchronous and asynchronous message passing. The next part of the course introduces distributed object technology. Event-based development relies on listener objects listening to events which are propagated along a
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Successful IT systems
Information technology (IT) systems are a critical part of our world, in business and the public and voluntary sectors. They are often highly complex and interconnected combinations of technology, organisations and people. Success and failure of IT systems can be seen in many different settings. Many are highly successful; others fail, sometimes spectacularly. This free course focuses on success, to help you understand what is meant by a successful IT system.Author(s): Creator not set

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Introduction

Requires that Windows desktop be used in parallel with reading the book.

Tables and charts are a great way to present numerical information in a clear and concise form. This course explains how to use the Windows calculator to carry out basic operations and calculate percentages. You will then learn how to use charts and tables to represent and interpret information.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 1 study in Author(s): The Open University

2.3 Truth values

We will want to distinguish between statements that are true and statements that are false. Another fundamental form of data allows us to do this. This form of data consists of just two values, which we shall write as true and false.

Not all texts use the same notation: some use T and F; others may use 0 for false and 1 for true (or the reverse!).

We may refer to true and false as truth values, or Boolean values
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1.1 Abbreviations used within this unit

While reading this subject you may come across the following abbreviations.

AAL – ATM adaptation layer

API – application program interface

ARP – address resolution protocol

ATM – asynchronous transfer mode

B-ISDN – broadband ISDN

CLP – cell loss priority

DNS – domain name system

FTP – file transfer protocol

HTTP – hypertext transfer protocol


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4.5 Input and output considerations

In this final portion of Section 4, I shall look in outline at how text, moving pictures and sound can be input into a PC and output from it. I'll leave aside the possibility that the data has been obtained by buying a disk or downloading via the Internet and assume that the user is creating it.

I'll start by considering text, typed in at the keyboard. Pressing a key closes a contact and causes electrical current to flow. This enables the computer's keyboard input system to detect which
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References

Eyewitness Travel Guide (1997) Amsterdam. London, Dorling Kindersley. pp. 120-1.
Götz, V. (1998) Color and Type for the Screen. Berlin, RotoVision (in collaboration with Grey Press).
Hartley, J. (1994) Designing Instructional Text. 3rd edn. London, Kogan Page.
Michaelis, P. R. and Wiggins, R. H. (1982) ‘A human
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you t
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4.5 What's going on when searching for your ancestors

You have seen how general purpose search engines work. In this section we consider some of the additional techniques that are important to genealogical searches.


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6 Correlation

Activity 5

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity demonstrates how a simple correlation analysis can be carried out. Correlations tell us about the relationship between pairs of variabl
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5 The pedagogy of open learning

One of the key differences between open learning, where the ‘student’ is remote from the teacher, and a learner just reading a textbook or looking up information for themselves on the internet, is the need to encourage active learning. Whether the material is text, online quizzes or audio-visual elements, the learner should not be a passive absorber of information but actively interacting with the resources. This is grounded in views of how people learn. But I have made some assump
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Introduction

This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course L120 Ouverture: intermediate French.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 1 study in French.


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Advanced Spanish: Art in Buenos Aires
This free course, Advanced Spanish: Art in Buenos Aires, uses a documentary about artists in Buenos Aires to help you to develop your listening skills. By assessing various parts of the documentary you will be able to extend your comprehension of spoken Spanish. First published on Tue, 16 Oct 2018 as Author(s): Creator not set

6.2 Different kinds of ‘evidence’

The terms you use and the ways in which you support your argument depend on the subject you are studying and what kind of text you are talking or writing about.


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2.1 Reading

Before you begin your interrogation of a text, though, you have to get to know it in a general way. In a sense, you can ‘see’ visual texts (such as paintings, sculptures and buildings) all at once; there they are before you. You can move around them, looking at them from different angles. But with written, aural and moving image texts – in which words, sounds or images follow on from one another – you cannot become familiar with the whole thing until
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3 Roles

Quite often in work situations we are asked to work with a group of people we have not met before and with whom we may seem to have very little in common. The group, which may be labelled a ‘team’, could be tasked to organise or produce something about which some of the members may know more than others. After a period of initial awkwardness perhaps, the group members start to find out more about each other and attend to their task. It is quite likely that each of the members will then te
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Mathematics and Statistics. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance, and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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6.1 What is a pie chart?

A pie chart is a circular chart (pie-shaped); it is split into segments to show percentages or the relative contributions of categories of data.


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5.2.1 Discrete variables

The charts about different modes of transport and that on attendance figures at a range of cultural events all use what might be called ‘word categories’. Each category (e.g. bus, rail, cycle, and walk) is quite distinct from any other in the set of categories. Such distinct categories are known in mathematics as ‘discrete variables’.

Word categories are not the only type of variable that is discrete; numbers can also be discrete. For example, at the beginning of this section, w
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