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Astronaut at a Glance: Robert L. Behnken
A short autobiographical summary of Robert L. Behnken. HD download link: https://archive.org/details/NASAAstronautBiographicalVideos
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Teaching with Primary Sources
This film defines primary and secondary sources and explores the value of using primary sources in instruction. For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=6632
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Cells Can be Individuals, Just Like People
Featuring Tim Mosmann, Director of the Center for Vaccine Biology and Immunology; Michael and Angela Pichichero Director in the David H. Smith Center for Vaccine Biology and Immunology; Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and in the Center for Vaccine Biology and Immunology (SMD) Many functions in the body are regulated by populations of relatively small numbers (hundreds or thousands) of cells. Within each cell population, there is surprising diversity, and it may be e
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50 Years of Satisfaction
For the past five decades The Rolling Stones have enjoyed tremendous success as the original bad boys of rock for their image based on sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll. But what many people don’t realize is that this hasn’t always been the case for the group. “In 1962 the group started out in London as a wholesome group like The Beatles,” said John Covach, director of the Institute for Popular Music (IPM) at the University of Rochester. “But it wasn’t until 1965, after a deliberate
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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)
An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games.
Author(s): Fernandez-Vara, Clara,Rusch, Doris,Juul, Jesper,Ta

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT)
D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in deve
Author(s): Smith, Amy J.,Sanyal, Bishwapriya,Serrat, Victor G

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

1.3.3 Feeling safe and secure in school

As we noted above, children place importance on feeling safe and secure. This desire could be used as an argument both in favour of and against inclusive education. It is a fundamental characteristic of most conceptualizations of inclusive schools that they are places where all children can feel secure about being themselves. Opponents of inclusion might argue, though, that a fundamental problem in mixing children together is that they may be exposed to situations where they feel and experien
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1.2.4 Different classrooms, different experiences

The inclusive classroom is one that provides for the learning of a diverse range of children. The pupils in the above example were in streamed secondary education. The 1997 White Paper on education (DfEE, 1997) supported the policy of streaming by attainment in primary schools. Doug McAvoy, a former leader of a teaching union, interpreted this as ‘setting is good and mixed ability is bad’ (McAvoy, 1997, cited in Lyle, 1999). The practice of setting is endorsed through the National Literac
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2.3 Movie 6 - Jupiter Hot Spot

Jupiter Hot Spot

View document157.6KB video/quicktime

In this movie c
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2.2 What is natural?

Many critics of GM feel that the techniques reflect an unwelcome form of 'tampering with nature'. This is a particular concern of some consumers with respect to food. Such a view is sometimes scornfully interpreted as an expression of what is called the 'naturalistic fallacy' - a belief that equates morality with naturalness, seeing what is natural as 'right'. But concerns about GM foods may reflect a more reasoned and defensible position. It might be argued that consumers are not demanding a
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5.3 Emergency planning as a formal requirement

Several pieces of legislation make the preparation of emergency plans a statutory requirement. The European Directive on the control of major accident hazards (Council of the European Union, 1996a), the ‘Seveso II Directive’, outlines the planning requirements for industrial sites with large inventories of hazardous substances. In the UK, the requirements of this directive have been incorporated into the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations (Health and Safety Executive, 1999a). I
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2.3.6 Copolymers

So far, the discussion has been confined to polymers with only a single type of repeat unit, but in reality, a large and growing number of commercial polymers are actually composed of different types of unit attached together by chemical covalent bonds. They are known as copolymers, and can comprise just two different units (binary copolymers) or three (ternary), and so on. It is one of the common strategies used by molecular engineers to manipulate the properties of polymers to gain j
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Keep on learning

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There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from on a range of subjects. 

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Acknowledgements

This unit was written by Dr Angus Calder

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement and thanks are m
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2.5 Why intentions?

Most of the rest of Grice's paper is dedicated to spelling out a way of identifying the meaning of an individual utterance ‘on an occasion’ with the content of the utterer's intentions (Step One). The hard task he faces is to say what type of intention creates meaning. If someone shouts ‘I saw a film last night’ extremely loudly at their brother with the intention of making this brother fall off his bike, this ‘utterance’ (if that is the right word) does not thereby mean fall o
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2 Activity and questions

Listen to the following audio clip between Terry O'Sullivan, Senior Lecturer in Management at the Open University Business School, and Chris Stalker, Head of Campaigning Effectiveness at the National Council for Voluntary Organisations.

This audio clip is followed by a series of questions. It is suggested that you listen to the audio before attempting the questions.

Click to listen to the audio clip. (13 minutes)


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1.5.4 Summary

  • The Euro has become an important currency of denomination for government and corporate bonds.

  • There is now emerging a two-currency world, made up of the US dollar and the EU Euro.

  • The advantages to countries of being able to borrow internationally in their own currencies have not been lost to them, so there will be an incentive for the east-Asian countries to develop their own ‘regional’ financial markets.


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5.3. 1 What would you include in such a test?

An advisory group which drew up proposals for the new ‘Life in the United Kingdom’ naturalisation test, believed that the ‘two senses of “citizenship”, as legal naturalisation and as participation in public life, should support each other. In what has long been a multicultural society, new citizens should be equipped to be active citizens’ (Home Office Immigration and Nationality Directorate, 2003, Section 2).

Although they claimed that becoming British ‘does not mean assi
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2.2 2.2 Diversity between states

To attempt more precise definitions would run the risk of arbitrarily excluding many of the phenomena we need to address. In fact the intentionally loose, multifaceted nature of these definitions reflects the reality of regional diversity, which has many dimensions. The differences start with the states which in practical political terms largely define regions, for they are themselves very different in area and population size, in economic strength, in cultural homogeneity or heterogeneity, a
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 LicenceCopyright © 2