Man in the Black Hat: Who is to Blame for the Subprime Crisis?
Timothy Sinclair analyses the way in which all financial crises seem to generate an explicitly political hunt for the culprit, and asks whether the American credit rating agencies legitimately fill such a role in the ongoing credit crunch.
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When Credit Becomes Debt: Foreclosure and Forbearance in Subprime Mortgages
Paul Langley discusses the impact - both political and economic - of major US Federal Government programmes in support for forbearance by lenders of mortgage debt within the US subprime sector.
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Specter of the Subprime Borrower: Moving Beyond the Credit Score Analysis
Johnna Montgomerie asks the explicitly political questions of who are the subprime borrowers, how did they come to occupy such a position and what responsibility do public policy-makers and private sector creditors bear for their current status.
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The Role of Financial Risk in Privatised Keynesianism
Colin Crouch analyses postwar economic and financial regulation against a series of changes in the fundamental character of macroeconomic regimes, linking the current subprime crisis to the development of a regime of privatised Keynesianism.
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Asset-Based Welfare and the Financialisation of the Citizen
Alan Finlayson discusses the ethics and political theory of response to the subprime crisis, situating his analysis with respect to the UK Government's attempts to create a 'financially literate' population suited to undertaking the move to an asset-based system of welfare.
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Financial Innovation: Frame, Conjuncture and Bricolage
Ewald Engelen, Ismail Erturk, Julie Froud, Adam Leaver and Karel Williams collaborate on a paper about how the type of financial innovation which eventually led to the subprime crisis is constructed in different discourses, in financial journalism and official reports as much as in mainstream academic finance or social studies of finance.
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Embedded Liberalism is Dead, Long Live Embedded Liberalism: National Welfare Concerns and Internatio
Leonard Seabrooke looks at how the subprime crisis and resulting international credit crunch demonstrates how uniquely national welfare and financial systems can blend into broader world economy structures, in different ways providing both sources of stability and sources of instability for global finance.
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The Global Credit Crunch as the Crisis of Artificial Liquidity
Anastasia Nesvetailova discusses whether liquidity is the cause of the financial instability associated with the subprime crisis and the ensuing credit crunch, whilst asking how liquidity structures currently affect the workings of the economy.
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Buy-To-Let, Financialization and the Geographies of Risk
Andrew Leyshon and Shaun French analyse the buy-to-let market and its economic implications, including social and financial advancement and the creation of distinct spatial trajectories of stress within post-credit crunch urban housing markets.
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Headlong into the Polanyian Dilemma: Reaction and Overreaction to Banking Sector Distress
Matthew Watson discusses how the world credit crunch which began in the summer of 2007 has been responsible for the explicit politicisation of the housing market amidst a moral panic surrounding the status of homeowner.
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Good Inflation, Bad Inflation: The Housing Boom, Economic Growth and the Disaggregation of Inflation
Colin Hay looks at the recent implosion of the house price bubble in the liberal market economies of Western Europe and asks whether this raises serious concerns about macroeconomic management there, focusing in particular on the counter-inflationary preferences of public authorities.
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Roundtable Discussion of the Political Economy of the Subprime Crisis
Participants - Ben Rosamond (Warwick, chair); Andrew Gamble (Cambridge); Robert Wade (LSE); Brigitte Young (Muenster). Including question and answer session.
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Intelligence and Evidence - Mark Tuley & Mike Griffiths
Mark Tuley & Mike Griffiths (Police International Counter-Terrorism Unit/National Counter-Terrorism Security Office) address the following: What is intelligence? Goodies and Baddies both gather intelligence. The Intelligence Cycle and it’s use within the Governments counter-terrorism Strategy. Government counter-terrorism strategy
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Obsessions with the Unknown - Dr Bill Durodié
Dr Bill Durodié (Resilience Centre, Cranfield University). When former US Secretary of State for Defence, Donald Rumsfeld, warned of the dangers lurking within the 'unknown unknowns' at a press conference in 2002, he was using an increasingly common argument - widely advocated by environmental campaigners before him - that the risks we should really worry about are those that we don't even know we know nothing about. Is this line of argument fruitful for risk management processes or is society
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Intelligence, Evidence & the Prevention of Terrorism - Dr Adrian Hunt
Dr Adrian Hunt (School of Law, University of Birmingham) When does intelligence become evidence? Is this a way of justifying action which ordinarily would not be then treated as evidence without clear protections of disclosure and opportunities for legal challenge? This paper will consider a range of activities from UN blacklisting to EU measures and domestic control orders.
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How terrorism has invaded German law - Professor Thomas Weigend
Professor Thomas Weigend (University of Cologne). The threat of terrorism hit Germany in two waves, the first in the 1970s and 1980s, the second in the general context of 11 Sept., 2001. Both waves have led to extensive legislation in substantive and procedural criminal law. The 1970s saw the introduction of the new criminal offence of being a member of a terrorist organisation as well as ad hoc legislation cutting back on the rights of the defence. More recently, the powers of the State to use
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The effect of the war on terrorism on civil liberties in the European Union - Tony Bunyan
Tony Bunyan (Statewatch). This talk will examine the nature of the terrorist threat posed after 11 September 2001, considering the claims that demands for security have been balanced by respect for rights and civil liberties and that this terrorism threatens to destroy "our way life" - by asking whose way of life? I will contend that there are at least two world views on what has happened and that the threat to "our way of life" comes more from the reactions of EU governments to the threat of te
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Combatting terrorism or excluding foreigners - Naomi Norberg
Naomi Norberg (Collège de France). The Europe Union began tightening immigration controls well before the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States: as the Schengen acquis made it easier to move about within the Union, the moat around “fortress Europe” grew deeper and wider as the 1990s wore on. But those attacks, and subsequent ones in Europe, catalyzed the passage of stricter immigration laws that, in many cases, implement harsh asylum policies as well. In an attempt to ke
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Covering Cyberterrorism: Issues For Journalists - Philp Seib
Even journalists who have covered conflict for many years may find themselves challenged by the complexities of reporting about Internet-based terrorist activity.
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Cybercrime: How Organized Crime Profit From Technology - Phillipe Very and Betrand Monnet
Cybercrime is a generic concept that covers a huge diversity of illicit activities developed by individuals as well as structured groups. Criminal organizations like mafias, cartels and gangs nowadays use cybercrime for attacking companies.
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