1.3 Summary

  • Modern sport and the media are closely linked in a variety of ways.

  • One area of connection is through big events and sports celebrities.

  • The media also provide routine coverage, scores, results, venue and scheduling details and everyday information, often at speed; for example, through the internet, and satellite and mobile phone technologies.

  • This type of coverage is illustrated by the example of English p
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Introduction

The media play a huge part in sport; we find out what's happening, how our team is doing and it creates great sporting moments and sports celebrities and stars. This course looks at the role played by the media in sport and how this has changed with the development of internet and satellite TV. Who calls the shots – athletes, teams or the media moguls? How do social scientists explain this relationship between sport and the media?

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 stu
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7.3 Summary

The idea of discourse alerts us to a number of issues about the social construction of social problems. It suggests that we need to look beyond competing theories or perspectives to look at how knowledge is organised around central themes that allow the different theories to compete. Discourses define what the problem is, and it is because theories share the definition of the problem that they can compete and argue. Perspectives that start somewhere else – or do not share the definition of
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4.2 Reasons for studying religion

Exercise 7

Identify and jot down reasons that you think might prompt someone to make a study of religion.

Discussion

Here are some reasons i
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5.5.2 Mimetic pressures

Mimetic pressures come from the pressure to imitate what others do. The world is complicated and finding the optimal solution often difficult. One way of dealing with this complexity is to copy others. For example, in my own consulting work I carried out an assignment for British Petroleum (BP). Subsequently, other (smaller) clients would often ask me ‘So how does BP do this?’, usually with little regard for the different circumstances they faced. It is this mimetic pressure that
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this free course, you should be able to:

  • identify your objectives;

  • assess what you have to offer;

  • balance these against a practical framework of your personal circumstances;

  • explore a range of reference sources to select what is most relevant;

  • prepare an action plan, including evaluation of achievements;

  • produce ongoing strategies to develop your voluntary work;

  • understand emp
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6.2 ‘No-choice’ dispersal

Dispersal as a strategy aimed at resolving tensions, avoiding ‘concentrations of aliens’ and preserving ‘ethnic balance’ and ‘cultural homogeneity’ is not a new idea, but one proposed for the settlement of successive groups of refugees, and indeed immigrants, since the 1930s, and also used in the 1960s and 1970s in relation to housing and education (Lewis, 1998). The government's asylum dispersal policy of 1999, intended to ‘ease the burden’ of the south-east of England, was b
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5.6 Public understanding and perception of science

Everyday reality presents itself not just through the senses but intersubjectively (Berger and Luckmann, 1966) – that is, we form meanings about the world because we talk to others about what we perceive. Scientific knowledge is also formed intersubjectively through being shared within a community of scientists – a community of practice which stipulates what constitutes legitimate scientific knowledge, and validates the epistemological assumptions made by its own traditions.


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RoseLee Goldberg South African-born world authority on performance art spoke at the Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts GIPCA Great Texts Big Questions lecture on 11 March Goldberg illustrious career as art historian critic curator and author has spanned almost three decades and has helped shape the public view of live performance as a visual art form Her book Performance Art from Futurism to the Present was first published in 1979 and pioneered the study of performance art even
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Bulletin of the Institute for Antiquity and Christianity, Volume XVI, Issue 1
CONTENTS: Cover Illustration Description, Calendar of Events, Scholar in Focus: James M. Robinson, Update on Computerized Nag Hammadi Library, Scholarly Societies to Hold Meetings in Claremont, Silva Delivers Lectures in Claremont, Contexts No. 11--"In Quest of the Rhetorical Jesus", Notes and News, New SAC Volume Now Available
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Physical rights are retained by the institution. Copyright is retained in accordance with U.S. Copyright laws.

Social movements and global justice
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In this podcast we hear about an international conference which brings together academics and social movement activists from around the world.

The conference is hosted by the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, in the School of Politics and International Relations.

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The Causes of Magnetic Properties
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