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4.3 Conclusion

If social researchers are to be effective in understanding people, they need to be detached from common sense (the perspective of the person on the street). However, they should not be so detached that they fall into the trap of imposing their own categories upon the object without regard for the experience of those involved (the perspective of the expert).

The standpoint of the ‘stranger’ provides a way of mediating between the detached position of the scientist and the personal ex
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand what we mean by the entanglements of social welfare and crime control, by exploring the tensions and relations between ‘watching over’ and watching out for’

  • understand policy responses and their relevance to the course

  • identify different kinds of evidence – in particular, visual evidence and interview evidence

  • demonstrate a development of skills in ICT, including h
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4.1 Conclusion

Every era defines for itself its most pressing economic problems. They emerge from a complex public dialogue, involving ideas and experience, theories and political pressures. Economists influence and take part in that dialogue but they certainly do not control it. Are we living through a new industrial revolution powered by ICT? Should we be grateful to big companies such as Microsoft and Nike for their new products or try to curtail their power? Does more material well-being always make peo
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3.5 Looking ahead: economic change and human well-being

There are different interpretations of the new economy and its impact on human well-being, on whether the changes sometimes labelled the ‘new economy’ are desirable or beneficial. It is time to review the benefits and costs of the new economy.

Question 3

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • illustrate how cities can be represented as dangerous places to live

  • give examples of the place of crime in representations of cities.


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Introduction

The material presented here raises general themes of order and disorder, the way they are represented or signified, and the place of crime in these representations. The material is based upon an audio file, originally 29 minutes in length, and examines the problem of crime in relation to the city of Glasgow. It was recorded in 1999.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 2 study in Author(s): The Open University

Successful IT systems
Information technology (IT) systems are a critical part of our world, in business and the public and voluntary sectors. They are often highly complex and interconnected combinations of technology, organisations and people. Success and failure of IT systems can be seen in many different settings. Many are highly successful; others fail, sometimes spectacularly. This free course focuses on success, to help you understand what is meant by a successful IT system.Author(s): Creator not set

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

9.1 What is a state machine?

An event is an occurrence of a phenomenon at a certain moment in time. The occurrence of the event itself is assumed to have no duration. Typically, when an event occurs, it affects the state of an object. A state machine is a model of the behaviour of a single object over time and helps you to understand how that object's state affects its reactions to events.

Figure 18 shows a state machine diagram (known as a statechart diagram in the UML) relating to the occupancy of a room in a hot
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6.1 Implementing

This is the phase when you complete your assignment. In some courses and for some assignments, the exploring and implementing phases may merge or overlap; in other courses, considerable exploration is needed before the actual assignment can be done. If there are several parts to your assignment, part of your planning might be to move back and forth between exploring and implementing - studying for and then completing part of the question, then returning for more study before tackling the rest
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9 Notes to help you complete your assessment

To complete your assessment portfolio you must include a contents page indicating how your reflective commentary in Part A and your evidence in Part B are related. An example of a suitable format for the contents page is in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1 (PDF, 1 page, 0.1MB)

Although the requirements of Parts A and B are listed separately
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4 Conclusion

This course has given you a good many tips about what is useful and what things to avoid. These tips are just the beginning of the practical ‘know-how’ you'll develop once you've begun your MST study. Some of the skills you'll learn will be specific to the particular subjects you're studying – biologists have different diagrammatic ‘tools of the trade’ from mathematicians, computer enthusiasts and physicists. Other, more general skills will be central to actually studying and to ref
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3.1.2 Option 2: Copying out diagrams

I am trying to encourage you to use diagrams, but there is a pitfall associated with this option. This option is one that many students do use, so it's worth exploring why it is not a particularly good idea. The following is a slight parody of the sort of written assignment I have in mind. The text reads something like this:

‘There are many ways in which diseases can be spread, see Figure 1.’

There then follows ‘Figure 1’ which is a direct copy of the diagram from the sour
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1.3 Developing your essay-writing ability

To develop your skill in writing essays you need to address two basic questions.

  • What does a good essay look like?

  • How do you set about producing one?

We will look at the first of these questions in this chapter and the second in the next.


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1.2 What is an essay?

The different arts and humanities subjects make their own particular demands on you. You may have to do various kinds of writing – diaries, logs, project reports, case-studies – or even write creatively. In this chapter, though, we are going to concentrate on the essay because that is by far the most common form of writing in arts and humanities subjects.

The word ‘essay’ originally meant ‘an attempt’ or try at something, but now it usually means a short piece of writing on
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying geography. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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2.1 How do we use maps?

Reading about maps, I have been struck by the number of times that the idea of ‘maps as part of our everyday experience’ has been mentioned. In fact, I was thinking about it recently, when I was preparing to travel from Belfast to London. I left home with a mental map of my journey to the airport – but on the way I found that the road was blocked by a burst water main. ‘Plan B’ was to consult my local road map for the quickest alternative and, in doing so, I wondered i
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1.1 What makes a map?

Map 1
Map 1 The Millennium Dome in Greenwich, one of 56,000 photographs taken for the Mill
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Introduction

The body has traditionally been treated as a biological object in psychology. However, some psychologists believe there is more to our bodies than that as they recognise that it is through the body that we relate to other people and the world about us. This free course, The body: a phenomenological psychological perspective, explores one particular theoretical perspective on embodiment: the phenomenological psychological perspective. This is an approach to psychology that acknowledges
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