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5.6 Business continuity planning

An organisation's strategy regarding insurance for its business risks is no substitute for high-quality risk management and emergency preparedness to address all contingencies. Some incidents we have mentioned above. Others may involve IT security for example. While the day-to-day activity of an organisation may not be particularly hazardous, it can still be affected by a hazard not of its own making. Examples might be a natural disaster such as flooding, or a hazardous activity on an adjacen
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Conclusion

  • We are biologically predisposed to provide for our offspring and may try to ensure that this provision continues after our death. However, our interactions with other members of society are wide-ranging and many people leave legacies to benefit the wider community.

  • All species alter their environment to some extent because they do not live in isolation from one another. The study of the interactions between plants, animals and their environmen
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5.5 Indoor pollutants

Before leaving air pollution you might reflect that many of us spend most of our time indoors where the air quality can differ from that outside the building.

Question 30

In what ways will the air be different inside a bu
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4.2 Environmental and labour standards

Question

Look back at Section 1. Why do trade unions in rich countries take up the cause of poor environmental and working conditions in developing countries as they did at Seattle? And why are developing country gover
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Business operations
This series of tracks examines the operations management in four service industries. Each has unique problems associated with their sector but they all have operational processes to ensure smooth delivery of their product. Material is taken from The Open University Course T883 Business operations: delivering value. The OpenLearn team.
First published on Fri, 26 M

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Ebusiness technologies: foundations and practice
Major retailers today face a major challenge to manage and distribute goods from suppliers around the world. What systems enable big business to keep in touch with latest sales information from their stores? How are Internet and Web technologies and their associated applications used in practice? This album explores how these technologies are changing the way businesses operate internally and externally. The seven video tracks examine a Tesco supply chain and present an insider's view of web ser
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Introduction

In this course we examine one factor that very often seems to be found skulking around close to problems and solutions: temperature.

Almost whatever we do, wherever we are, temperature changes. Stay in the same spot and you'll find daytime and night-time temperatures can be markedly different. You may even find significant changes in temperature during the day. When moving you can encounter more rapid variations. For example, an aircraft might leave a tropical runway where the air tempe
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An introduction to electronics
Electronics is fundamental to modern life. Using an interactive website, videos, and easy-to-use electronic circuit design and simulation software, this free course, An introduction to electronics, will show how electronic devices and systems pervade everything we do, and teach some of the basic ideas. First published on Thu, 01 Nov 2018 as Author(s): Creator not set

5.4.2 Leadership expectations

  • Largely because of expectations created in childhood (our 'inner child of the past'), we have many unconscious expectations of leaders, and may well harbour resentments, anxieties, suspicions, subservience, passive resistances and attitudes to leadership that have little relationship to current adult realities.

  • The leader needs to be able to manage these feelings and his or her own responses to them.

  • Leaders will tend to emerge
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2.4 Pulse spreading and bandwidth

Activity 3

Calculate the maximum signalling rate given by the Nyquist rate for the 1550 nm window, assuming that it runs from 1450 nm to 1610 nm.

Answer
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2.2 Fibre types

A strand of glass (or plastic, but the best performance comes from glass) has a core surrounded by a cladding, where the refractive index of the glass in the core is higher than that of the cladding (see the box on ‘Refractive index>’).

Light is contained within the core by
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2.1 Light sources and detectors

The basic building blocks of an optical-fibre link are the light source, the fibre and the detector (Figure 1).

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References

Austin, J. (1986) How to do things with words. Edited by J. O. Urmson and Marina Sbisà. New York: Oxford University Press
Engineering Council UK (n.d.) Statement of Ethical Principles.
Frayn, M. (1965) The
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5.9 Ethical reasoning

Now Ned's got three things. He's got the money that is presumably ‘good’. He's got his defence policy, which he thinks is ‘good’. Ros then introduces the well-being of the community. They are all ‘goods’ but each pulls in a different direction. Any judgement that Ned makes has to be based on an aggregation of these things. But, of course, these are quite different kinds of things, they are incommensurate, so adding up these things is not a straightforward proposition. Ros is hopin
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3.7 The role of technology

Technology is an increasingly important, if not dominant, element in operations. It was included as one of the resource inputs in the Figure 2 transformation model developed earlier, but treating it in this way potentially underestimates its role. Technology is often an important elem
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4.4 Evaluate solutions

If the obvious solution has been identified and everyone is in agreement, then a formal evaluation of solutions is unnecessary, and we would move on to modelling the design. However, if there is dissent then some stricter method of elimination is required, and this is usually achieved through a process of rank-ordering. There is little to be lost and potentially much to be gained by returning to the customer at this point for opinion, clarification or guidance.


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1.4 Routine solutions

This is the last of our three categories, and possibly the most difficult to define because the approach is not as definite. Routine solutions involve configuration or reconfiguration of existing devices or components, without innovation, because something is broken or needs to be repositioned, or there is simply a better way to do it. If you change the locks in your house or car, you are reconfiguring them; if you tune the car, calibrate the central heating, set the coordinates for your sate
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5.13.4 Pitches of notes produced by percussion instruments

We have seen that none of the rectangular bar, the circular membrane and the circular plate have harmonically related natural frequencies. It may not surprise you to learn, therefore, that instruments containing these primary vibrators tend to produce notes that don't have a very well-defined sense of pitch.

This is certainly true in the case of the cymbal, which has a circular plate as its primary vibrator. Whether a single cymbal is struck with a drumstick or two cymbals are crashed t
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5.13.1 Rectangular bar

If a solid rectangular bar is excited by striking it, energy is supplied that starts the bar vibrating transversely. The bar will vibrate in a number of modes simultaneously since the striking action supplies energy over a range of frequencies. The motion of the bar will be the superposition of the standing-wave patterns of the excited modes.

Assume for the moment that the rectangular bar is supported in such a way that both ends are free to vibrate and the effects of the supports can b
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5.11 Vibrating air column: standing waves in a conical tube

The third configuration of air column that we shall consider is that enclosed by a conical tube. Figure 17 shows the normal modes of vibration for a conical tube plotted in terms of pressure. As you would expect, there is a pressure antinode at the closed tip of the cone and a pressure node at the open en
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