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2.3 The use of sources

As you saw in the video clips and the introduction to the essays, engagement with the evidence from and about the Classical world that we can still access lies at the heart of exploring the Classical world (as indeed any other place or period in the past). Work with sources is a constant feature of Classical Studies. This section, therefore, introduces you to the available sources, and to ways of working with them.

We'll begin by discussing the different types of sources; later you will
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Say what you see
Try describing this picture.  If you are just beginning, try finding nouns to name the different items you see in the picture?  How about some adjectives?  Do you know the […]

CSI unmasked - the facts about forensics
Forensic anthropologist Kathleen Conabree discusses issues surrounding what really goes on at a crime scene and what the term forensic actually means.
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References

Abramovitz, M. (1996) Regulating the Lives of Women: Social Welfare Policy from Colonial Times to the Present (revised edition), Boston, MA, South End Press.
Burghes, L. (1987) Made in the USA: A Review of Workfare – a Compulsory Work-for-Benefits Regime, London, Unemployment Unit.
Clarke, J. (2001) ‘US welfare: variations on the liberal regime’ in Cochrane
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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8 Further resources

There is a wide range of material available on welfare to work. Peck (2001) is undoubtedly the definitive study in terms of policy development in the UK and the USA.

Major sources of data on all UK New Deal programmes are on the Department for Work and Pensions, DWPwebsite. (Accessed 25 March 2008)

Another source is the more analytical Working Brief series which
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7.4 Conclusion

Despite their very considerable differences, and the very different kinds of evidence they draw upon, it is clear from these brief exchanges between theoretical frameworks that ‘the personal’ and social policies meet and remake one another in multiple and complex ways. Making welfare directly conditional upon work represents an unusually focused response to particular perceptions of personal lives, and the material circumstances and social conducts associated with them. And as policies be
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6 A short biography of Mandy: comparing theories about work and welfare

Figure 7
Figure 7: Excl
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5 Personal Advisers, personal lives

What is clear from a wide range of New Deal evaluations (Dawson et al., 2000; O'Connor et al., 2001; Lewis et al., 2000) is that PAs provide a critical interface between the programme and its clients. The prominence of ‘personal’ in their title carries several meanings. Clients are allocated to PAs on a one-to-one basis, with the implication of a relationship, and of continuity. It also implies personal advice, which crosses the boundary of the informational into the distinctive needs of
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4.4 Finding ‘the personal’ in policy: responses, refusals and resistances

The reservation wage is one of many meeting points between personal lives and social policies. Personal lives fundamentally condition the rate of pay at which everyone individually decides they can or must work. Policies like New Deal necessarily regulate that level.

Activity 5


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4.3 Neo-Marxist interpretations of welfare to work

Neo-Marxists interpret welfare-to-work programmes as doubly alienating. First, the programmes deny workers control over the conditions of their ‘employment’ by forcibly constructing their relations with employers. Second, they deepen social inequalities because they are concerned with people who are weakest in the competitive labour market. Neo-Marxists view economic regulation as the principle purpose of welfare to work. Its task is to manage the contradictions of the capitalist welfa
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3.6 ‘Racialisation’ and racism

Section 1 made the point that attributing fixed ‘differences’ to particular groups can be seen as an exercise of power, by which certain people are defined as ‘other’, and usually as inferior. ‘Racialisation’ can be described as the process by which people are defined according to apparent differences of skin colour, national origin or other attributes, and positioned as different from the (usually white) majority.

The following series of linked activities gives you an oppor
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Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives, in 2014 she received the 2014 Karl Deutsch Award, given annually to the scholar under the age of 40 who has made the greatest impact on the field of international politics or peace research. In this conversation she discusses her life, influences and re
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Ejemplo de planeación argumentada educación física l.e.f. hugo enrique medina cruz

L.E.F.HUGO ENRIQUE MEDINA CRUZ

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Модернизация личных кабинетов педагогов на портале Д

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2.2.1 Try some yourself

Activity 12

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This is a short educational video for grades 3-5. Types of triangles by length- equilateral, isosceles, scalene. Types of triangles by angle: acute, right, obtuse. How to calculate perimeter and area of a triangle. (04:15)
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Hidden Line Elimination in Projected Grid Surfaces
The hidden line and hidden surface problems are simpler when restricted to special classes of objects. An example is the class of grid surfaces, that is, graphs of bivariate functions represented by their values on a set of grid points. Projected grid surfaces have geometric properties which permit hidden line or hidden surface elimination to be done more easily than in the general case. These properties are discussed in this paper, and an algorithm is given which exploits them
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Rights not set

Prof Nancy Cartwright: Building a Case: What You Can Do with the Evidence
In this IPR Public Lecture, noted philosopher Professor Nancy Cartwright of the University of Durham takes a serious look at the meaning of 'evidence', and how a case for effective policy can be built from it. This IPR Public Lecture took place on 14 September 2016, as part of the symposium Evidence and the Politics of Policymaking: where next?
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