Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 9528 result(s) returned

Babbage: The price of a private phone call
Would you spend £10,000 on a smartphone? Tom Standage and Anne McElvoy visit the world of luxurious technology. Matthew Kaplan explains how your holiday snaps can have scientific uses, and researcher Lauren Sherman reveals how teenage brains react to social media
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How Instant Payments Are Transforming Banking and Retail
New research shows financial services companies that deploy the latest instant payment methods can gain a competitive advantage.
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1.4.4 Covalent cross-linkages stabilise protein structure

Proteins that are secreted by the cell, or are attached to the extracellular surface of the plasma membrane, can be subject to more extreme conditions than those experienced by intracellular proteins. Often, covalent cross-linkages stabilise these proteins by connecting specific amino acids within a polypeptide or between polypeptide chains in multisubunit proteins (see below). Typically such a linkage will be a covalent sulfur–sulfur bond which forms between the –SH groups of two cystein
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1.4.3 Protein domains

An important concept in protein structure is that of the protein domain. In many cases, a single polypeptide can be seen to contain two or more physically distinct substructures, known as domains. Often linked by a flexible hinge region, these domains are compact and stable, with a hydrophobic core. Domains fold independently of the rest of the polypeptide, satisfying most of their residue–residue contacts internally. Typically, two or more layers of secondary structural elements eff
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Introduction

Until the 1980s, the icy satellites of the outer planets were scarcely thought of as places where life could ever have existed. Few could have imagined that one of them, Europa, would within twenty years have become the rival of Mars as a priority for astrobiological study. This course recounts the history of our changing perceptions of the icy satellites, examines the available evidence for their internal structures, and considers the niches offered for life to begin and to be sustained. In
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence. This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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3.2 Imagination and supposition

To regard images as playing an essential role in imagining is to conceive of imagination as a sensory power. But as we have seen, imagining can also occur in the absence of imagery, and we might take this to reveal a more intellectual form of imagination. Many philosophers have suggested that this more intellectual form of imagining be construed as supposing. On this view, to imagine something, in cases where there may be no imagery involved, is to suppose something. But is it right to
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2.3 Interdependency of systems

The control system approach to project control provides a simple overview of the process of planning, measuring against the plan and taking action to bring things back into line if necessary. This suggests that events will move in a fairly linear way. Life is messier than this, however, and every time that something happens it will have an impact on everything else around it – so the interdependency of systems is important to consider.

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1 Course overview

Never before have social issues been more at the centre of public and private debate than at the present. From concerns about sustainability and the future of the planet to the introduction of smoking bans, from actions to combat ‘binge drinking’ and childhood obesity to programmes designed to prevent the spread of AIDS in developing countries, there is a growing recognition that social marketing has a role to play in achieving a wide range of social goals. In the UK, for example, the Nat
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Introduction

Some people think that the difference between speech and writing is that people use longer words in writing. In some writing this is true, but there are also significant differences, many of which are grammatical. In this free course, English Grammar in context, you will develop knowledge and understanding of the differences between spoken and written English, factors that influence our use of grammar and vocabulary in speech and writing, and different ways in which grammar has been de
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Learning to Learn
Learning and change can mean big decisions and asking important questions. This free course, Learning to learn, is a friendly starting point introducing a range of key ideas to help you consider what you want to do with your life and learn, by suggesting ways of building on and 'fine-tuning' your own expertise and encouraging you to think of yourself as a learner. First published on Thu, 13
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Understanding children: Babies being heard
In this free course, Understanding children: Babies being heard, you will find out some of the things that very young babies can do. You will also discover how babies can contribute to family life and relationships from birth. You will look at what they need from other adults and children, and what they can learn. First p
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Accessibility of eLearning
It is part of a teaching professional's skills to understand the needs of a diverse population of students. This free course, Accessibility of eLearning, introduces the challenges for disabled students who may use computers in different ways when taking part in eLearning or may need alternative teaching methods. It covers the technology and techniques used by disabled students, the adjustments to teaching methods that might be reasonable, design decisions which affect the accessibility of eLearn
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Primary science: supporting children’s learning
Science is a key subject area in primary education curriculum frameworks. This free course, Primary science: supporting children's learning, provides an opportunity to consider your own experiences, perceptions and attitudes to science. You will explore and develop some of your scientific knowledge and understanding while considering how you can support primary-aged children's science learning. Author(s): Creator not set

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Teaching for good behaviour
The quality of our teaching inevitably has an impact on the behaviour of our students. This free course, Teaching for good behaviour, considers some of the factors that can contribute to misbehaviour in the classroom and some of the steps that we can take as teachers to re-engage students with the learning process. The course considers the format of lessons, how lessons are delivered, how to present lesson content in an interesting and creative way, and the development of 'engaging lessons'.
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3.8.1 Play the examiner

Activity 8

  • Take a particular question from a past or specimen exam paper and imagine that you are the examiner who set it. Note down which particular part of the course you set the quest
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3.8 Stage 6: Rehearsing answering exam questions

Just like assignment questions, exam questions should be read carefully, because you need to demonstrate in your answer that you have understood the question. Examiners frequently complain that students lose vital marks through failing to read and interpret the questions properly.


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6.2.2 Representing visual and symbolic texts

We saw that when you discuss your judgements of a visual text such as the landscape painting or The Madonna and Child, you talk about its ‘composition’: the way the ‘picture space’ is organised; the relationships between ‘foreground’ and ‘background’, and between ‘figures’. You discuss the way ‘perspective’ is used in the painting to show ‘depth’; the painting's tonal range’, and its uses of ‘colour’, ‘shape’, ‘line’; ‘light’ and ‘shade
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