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6.2.1 Quoting from written texts

We have seen that when you are discussing a poem, you talk about its ‘rhythms’ or movement, its patterns of sound such as ‘rhyme’, and its ‘imagery’ and ‘syntax’, quoting words, phrases and lines from the poem as evidence of the points you want to make about it. And this applies to play-texts and novels, too. As you discuss the ‘characters’ involved, you quote parts of their ‘dialogue’ or passages from the ‘narrator's’ descriptions of them. You also quote
Author(s): The Open University

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6.2 Different kinds of ‘evidence’

The terms you use and the ways in which you support your argument depend on the subject you are studying and what kind of text you are talking or writing about.


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6.1 Making a convincing case

If you were talking to a friend about a picture hanging on your living-room wall, you might say: ‘I really like that portrait because the man looks so lifelike’. That is, you'd make some kind of judgement about the painting. (I've never heard anyone say ‘I really like that portrait because of that little white brush stroke in the top right-hand corner’.) So, in effect, you turn the process we have just been through on its head. When you are communicating your ideas to other peo
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4.3 Analysis and interpretation

We have got to the point of recognising that this is a lyric poem, and of thinking that it is probably about a lovers’ meeting. But you cannot reach firmer conclusions about a text's meanings until you have looked at as many aspects of it as you can. I think we need to go back again to the detail of the poem, because the analysis is not full enough yet.

For one thing, there is something odd about the poem's syntax. If you look at the verbs in the first verse you'll see that they are a
Author(s): The Open University

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4.2 Meaning and ‘form’

The question remains, what is this poem ‘about’? Or, rather, we should ask, ‘what kind of poem is it?’ Poems (paintings, ideas, music, buildings, historical documents) are not all ‘one kind of thing’. As we become familiar with poetry we learn to distinguish between different kinds of poem, or between different poetic forms.

Epic poems, for example, are extremely long stories about the doings of a noble warrior, voyager, or similar ‘hero’. Other char
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4.1 Knowledge about context and author

After you had read the poem a few times, you no doubt pieced together that the ‘I’ of line 5 in the first verse, the speaker, is rowing in a boat at night. We probably realise that with the word ‘prow’. By the end of the first verse the boat is beached in a cove. The journey continues over the beach and fields to a farm (by foot, presumably, since we hear about no other means of transport). There the traveller meets someone. It appears that they exchange signals – the tap on the pan
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3.2 Carrying out an analysis

Here, then, is the two-verse poem we will focus on in the next few sections of the course. As you see, I have left out the ends of the lines in the second verse. So it presents you with a kind of ‘puzzle’. (But I have included the punctuation, and added line numbers for ease of reference.)

  1. The grey sea and the long black land;

  2. And the yellow half-moon large and low;

  3. And the startled little waves that leap


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5.4 The politics of disability

Activity 26

1 hour 0 minutes

Below you will find links to three support groups. You can select just one of the groups or you may choose to look at all three. Answe
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Experiments with Candies, Dice and Colloids
By: icamvid Paul Chaikin gives a public lecture at the Boulder Condensed Matter Physics summer school 2012 about Experiments with Candies, Dice and Colloids.
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RoseLee Goldberg on Performance Art
RoseLee Goldberg South African-born world authority on performance art spoke at the Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts GIPCA Great Texts Big Questions lecture on 11 March Goldberg illustrious career as art historian critic curator and author has spanned almost three decades and has helped shape the public view of live performance as a visual art form Her book Performance Art from Futurism to the Present was first published in 1979 and pioneered the study of performance art even
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Inference for Proportions Activity
This activity provides practice for constructing confidence intervals and performing hypothesis tests. In addition, it stresses interpretation of confidence intervals and comparison and application of results in context.
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Correlation
The applets in this section allow you to see how different bivariate data look under different correlation structures. The Movie applet either creates data for a particular correlation or animates a multitude data sets ranging correlations from -1 to 1.
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SPC Study Away - Puerto Rico Faculty Message: Eric Tucker
http://www.youtube.com/user/StPetersburgCollege SPC Study Away - Puerto Rico Faculty Message: Eric Tucker About St. Petersburg College: In 1927, St. Petersburg College (then known as St. Petersburg Junior College) became Florida's first private, non-profit, two-year school of higher learning located in downtown St. Petersburg. Full accreditation followed in 1931 and in 1948 SPC became a public college. In June 2001, SPJC officially became St. Petersburg College when Florida's governor sign
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The Genius of Mozart (Part 4 of 18)
From the 2004 movie.
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Justice et management : enjeux et défis

Troisième partie de l’Essentiel "Eléments pour une rencontre de la Sociologie et de l’Economie" qui fait suite à la Grande Leçon "La sociologie peut-elle aider à comprendre l'économie ? - Le nouveau management public".

Les auteurs vous proposent de rencontrer Frédéric Schoenaers (sociologue), Joël Ficet (politologue) et David Delvaux (sociologue) pour comprendre quels sont les enjeux liés à l’introduction du référentiel managérial au sein des
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An Experimental Study on Peer Selection in a P2P Network over PlanetLab
Peer selection is an important aspect in many P2P applications requiring efficient assignment and execution of jobs to peer nodes and search and file transfer, among others. Due to increasing interest of using P2P systems for distributed computing, peer selection is taking relevance and several models have been proposed in the P2P literature. Yet, there are very few experimental studies for peer selection in P2P networks deployed in real large scale networks. In this work we present an experimen
Author(s): Xhafa Fatos,Barolli Leonard,Fernandez Raul,Daradou

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Rights not set

A Ram Sam Sam: A Moroccan Tune with a Twist
Students will enjoy singing, playing rhythm instruments, reading notations, and performing a Moroccan tune in two different musical styles on student keyboards.
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Boston Art Ensemble perform in the Say Brother Studio
Excerpt from compilation program featuring the Boston Art Ensemble performing in the Say Brother studio.
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Australian aborigines visit Franklin Park
Footage of Australian aborigines applying body paints of clay and charcoal and performing tribal dances in Boston's Franklin Park. Includes African American children interacting with the aborigines as they try to learn how to use the didgeridoo.
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Auburn vs. Alabama (1953)
"The two best teams in the SEC met for their annual intrastate battle in Birmingham with a "Winner Take All" situation facing them. Both teams had strong offenses and stout defenses. The defenses played the major role in the game however, as neither team could muster more than one touchdown drive. The X and Y teams played outstanding ball and deserved to win this, the most important game of the season. Dooley's x unit was probably the more effective that afternoon, but Vince was injured in the t
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These images may be under copyright and are for Web viewing only. Reproductions are not available at this time. For further information, please contact the Auburn University Athletics Department at

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