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Druppels op je ziel : Les 2 - Druppels op je ziel - Deus@school
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Deze lesvoorbereiding is een les bij de lessenreeks Druppels op je ziel. De volgende onderdelen komen aan bod:

  • ziekte,
  • mislukken,
  • liefdesverdriet,
  • dood en eenzaamheid.

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2.2.1 Summary

  • Children's developing understanding of gender can be described as a search for certainty.

  • Young children make mistakes about gender illustrating their rigidity and their naive certainty regarding gender.

  • As children's knowledge of gender grows in complexity, basic biological knowledge is added to their social-cultural understanding.

  • Research by Francis illustrating girls' ‘sensible-selfless’ and boys'
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1.3.2 Systems diagrams and diagrams helpful for systems work

Diagrams are used extensively in systems thinking and practice. All of those types included in the animated tutorial, as well as other types not covered there, can or have been used in systems studies. As mentioned at the beginning of the unit the use of diagrams is very personal. For instance I find it helpful to group diagrams into three sorts depending on
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1.2 A Babylonian mathematical problem

Before seeing how our knowledge has been acquired, let us get into the spirit of things by ascertaining what a problem looks like once the modern cuneiform scholar has translated a tablet. The following example is taken from a tablet (see Figure 2), now at Yale University, translated by Otto Neugebauer and Abraham Sachs. Words in square brackets are their suggested reconstructions of what the tablet presumably says (where it is damaged), and words in parentheses are the translator's additions
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1.7.2 Interpretation of a geological exposure

We now want to make use of the observations obtained by sketching the exposure, and it is useful to start by briefly summarising the features seen. First of all, you probably noticed the large boulder in the foreground of Figure 16 (which has been attached below for ease of access). Where did this bou
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Conclusion

Earthquakes shake the ground surface, can cause buildings to collapse, disrupt transport and services, and can cause fires. They can trigger landslides and tsunami.

Earthquakes occur mainly as a result of plate tectonics, which involves blocks of the Earth moving about the Earth's surface. The blocks of rock move past each other along a fault. Smaller earthquakes, called foreshocks, may precede the main earthquake, and aftershocks may occur after the main earthquake. Earthquakes are mai
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4.1 An overview of the UK perspective

You have looked at the international scene regarding human rights but what of the position in England? You may be wondering: ‘If the common law developed over hundreds of years in this country surely the courts must at some stage have been called upon to consider the issue of human rights?’. As you might expect, the answer to this question is in the affirmative.

However, over the centuries the lack of legal instruments on human rights was itself an inhibition on the development of h
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1.7 Fractions

A fraction is written as one number over another (such as ) and means the top number divided by the bottom number. The top number, 3, is called the numerator and the bottom number, 10, is call
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3.2 Negative coordinates

Up to now only those points with positive or zero coordinates have been considered. But the system can be made to cope with points involving negative coordinates, such as (−2, 3) or (−2, −3). Just as a number line can be extended to deal with negative numbers, the x-axis and y-axis can be extended to deal with negative coordinates.

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5 Example of a straightforward subtraction

In the example below of a straightforward subtraction, in every column the digit at the top of the column is bigger than the digit at the bottom. Click on each step in turn to see how to carry out the calculation.

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