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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary and is used under licence.

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3 Learning styles and museums

It is generally accepted that children and adults learn most effectively in a variety of ways, that we have as human beings a range of differentiated learning styles.

If we had access to resources like this, we could make learning real … Having the freedom to walk a bit more, have a bit more space, spread out into this environment is so conducive to learning. It's very special.

Inspiring Learning for All (2
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Acknowledgements

Author Details

This unit was originally prepared for TeachandLearn.net by Heather Rendall. Heather is a CiLT Associate Trainer and freelance consultant. Her specialisms are ICT, grammar and reading skills. She continues to research into the ‘how’ of learning.

The Modern Foreign Language units have been developed for TeachandLearn.net in collaboration with CiLT.

Other Acknowledgemen
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1.3. Moving forward

Language is constantly changing: words come and go and human history is caught like a fly in amber in words we use without thinking every day. By developing in our students the awareness of links, cognates, changes in meaning, oddities of spelling and sound, we enrich not just their mother tongue and foreign languages but their knowledge of global history of the last two thousand years.

The state
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3. What does visualisation mean?

‘Imagery is a powerful force for perception and understanding. Being able to “see” something mentally is a common metaphor for understanding it. An image may be of some geometrical shape, or of a graph or diagram, or it may be some set of symbols or some procedure.

Visualising means summoning up a mental image of something – seeing it in your mind. Some people can actually close their eyes and “see” a p
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3.2 The Every Child Matters agenda

The government's vision for extended schools builds on the Every Child Matters (ECM) initiative. Click on the following links for more information Every Child Matters: Change for children in schools [accessed 26 January 2007]. It is founded on five outcomes:

  • Be healthy.

  • Be safe.

  • Enjoy and achieve.

  • Make a positive contribution (as a citizen).

  • Be employable.

In moving t
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References

Nicola Morgan at ContinYou, [http://www.readingclub.org.uk, accessed 26 January 2007].
Jack Prelutsky, ‘I Met a Dragon Face to Face’ in Good Books, Good Times! By Lee Bennett Hopkins and Harvey Stevenson, HarperCollins.

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Introduction

This unit is aimed at geography teachers, or those with an interest in studying or teaching geography. This unit looks at the contribution that geography can make in the education of young people and the characteristics and purpose of geography as a subject.


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3.1 Using and developing a popular topic: migration

‘Oh, what joy to see you again.’

Just one line from a folk song on a very familiar theme, to be found in traditional Irish music, can help us imagine the magnitude of the decision to migrate, especially if forced by hunger, oppression or fear. The line is written by a father to a son. They both know they will not see each other again.

Like many topics in geography, teaching migration well is challenging – because the human dimension is often multi-faceted and holds more subt
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3 ‘Acts’ and ‘status’ citizenship

We aim at no less than a change in the political culture of this country both nationally and locally: for people to think of themselves as active citizens, willing, able and equipped to have an influence in public life.

Crick report, 1998

In the DfES document Making Sense of Citizenship: A CPD Handbook a distinction is drawn between acts citizenship and status cit
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4.1 CEG programmes

My favourite teacher was a PE teacher we called JJ. We got on well. He was a cool guy. He was a teacher I could talk to without any problems. He would sit me down sometimes and try to sort me out. A lot of the teachers I didn't get along with. I wasn't very big on school. It has improved now, I believe, but when I was there they taught you to try to pass exams, they didn't tell you much about life.

Jeremy Guscott, for
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Introduction

Successful transitions – whether from lower secondary to upper secondary; at age 16; into work-based training or university; or into work at any age – are life-enhancing for individuals and crucial to our future social and economic well-being. They are also an indicator of a good school. Careers education and guidance (CEG) is therefore at the heart of a school's personal development programme and all teachers have a role in securing successful transitions for their students.

This u
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3. Responding to criticisms

A government minister and a school governor made the following comments, respectively:

‘Art is the icing on the cake.’

‘We have children here who can't even speak English properly – they should be doing more of that instead of leisure subjects like art.’

Both of these are, as you may appreciate, instrumental – or means–end – statements. In their various ways they place art, and by implication other humanities subjects, unfavourably on a spectrum according to
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5.3.4 Discussion with the mentor

In this session the tutor should cover the following:

  • thank the mentor for supporting the student teacher and stress the importance of their role in training and assessment;

  • student teacher progress towards the assessment outcomes for the level and the standards for QTS;

  • the student teacher's completion of the school experience activities;

  • issues that emerged from the one-to-one tutorial;


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4.2 Observing teachers and pupils

Effective observation is crucial in the professional development of all teachers. When beginning to learn this skill it is difficult, as a student teacher, to know how and what to observe. Student teachers may also be so eager to attempt teaching, that they may overlook the advantages for learning about teaching that observation provides. It is important to recognise that how and what is observed will change as teaching skills develop and a new focus for observation emerges. Indeed, observati
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will:

  • have an understanding of the role of mentor in relation to supporting a student teacher in the early stages of becoming a teacher;

  • recognise the skills of coaching, support and guidance required of the role;

  • have considered the issues connected with the assessment of teacher competencies.


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1.4.8 Summary

In this section we have introduced you to the PROMPT checklist as a useful tool for assessing the quality of any piece of information. If you use it regularly you will find that you develop the ability to scan information quickly and identify strengths and weaknesses. As a closing exercise you might like to pick one of the websites below or any of your own choice and try to evaluate it using the PROMPT criteria. To make it easier for you we have provided a printable checklist (see below).


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1.3.14 Summary

There is a lot of information available on education via the internet. Try the activity below to start exploring what is available.

Activity

1.3.9 Reports

Often research results, policy documents, conference papers etc. do not always get published through official channels in journals, books or conference proceedings. Consequently they may be more difficult to track down.

British Education Index An electronic archive of "gr
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2 Vygotsky and socio-cultural psychology

Copyright © 2000 The Open University and Macquarie University

The principal historical figure behind socio-cultural psychology is Lev Vygotsky, who lived in Moscow during the 1920s. By all accounts he was an unusual man, a many-talented individual who directed plays and wrote about subjects as diverse as art, neurophysiology and Marxist theory. But his main occupation was as an educational psychologist, mainly working with children who had severe physical and mental disabilities. Inspi
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