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Environmental Education at Acadia National Park
is designed for teachers and students preparing for a visit to this park, which includes nearly 40,000 acres of Maine coastline.
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Introduction

This unit explores conceptual tools for assisting our thinking and deliberation on what matters. In Section 1, a reading by Ronald Moore introduces the notion of 'framing' nature, raising the perceived paradox of inevitably devaluing an aesthetically pleasing unframed entity. Three further readings, two from Fritjof Capra and one from Werner Ulrick (all of which are quite short and markedly reduced from their original courses), provide an understanding of systems thinking for explicitly frami
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1.2 Considering disabled people

There are approximately one billion disabled people in the world – that’s around a seventh of the world’s population (World Bank, 2017). In Europe, one in seven people of working age (15–64) say that they have some form of disability (Author(s): The Open University

1.2 Different reasons for doing PhDs

Just as there are different views of what a PhD is or means, there are different reasons for undertaking a PhD, ranging from the pragmatic – acquiring a research credential for academia or for industry – to the idealistic – aspiring to deep scholarship. And students have many reasons in between, including things like curiosity, a drive to chase a long-held question, and the need to prove oneself. What's important here is not the reason for starting, but the compelling reason for finishi
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Acknowledgements

Don't miss out:

1. Join over 200,000 students, currently studying with The Open University [http://www.open.ac.uk/ choose/ ou/ open-content]

2. Enjoyed this? Find out more about this topic or browse all our free
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2.3 Central questions in addiction

Arising out of these issues, it is possible to define questions central to a study of addiction. Take time to consider and answer these questions:

3.2 Ethnicity and disadvantage

Detailed information on other disadvantaged groups in the UK is more limited. Recent studies of the labour market disadvantage faced by Britain's minority ethnic groups indicate not only that they fare badly relative to white employees, but also that their relative position deteriorated throughout the 1980s and early 1990s. According to the General Household Survey, non-white employees in the UK earned 7.3 per cent less, on average, than white employees over the period 1973–9: this d
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Hemingway - The Old Man and the Sea - documentary excerpt
Readings from the novella, the Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway.  The clip also includes interviews with folks from Cuba who knew Hemingway back in the day. 

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5.4 The politics of disability

Activity 26

1 hour 0 minutes

Below you will find links to three support groups. You can select just one of the groups or you may choose to look at all three. Answer the two question
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3.9 Being on the receiving end

Case Study 2: The Cameron family

David and Marie Cameron, a married couple in their 40s, live in a middle-class suburb. Marie teaches French at the local secondary school, while David is a full-time official for a clerical workers’ union. Both are active in the local Labour Party but, althoug
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3.3 The Keeling curve

The Keeling curve is the plot showing the trend in rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations since 1958 recorded at Mauna Loa in Hawaii. The story of atmospheric CO2 in the last 50 years is a relentless rise derived from human use of hydrocarbons and, as I write this in 2008, the annual mean concentration is 383 parts per million (ppm). When Keeling first collected his CO2 data he travelled around making the measurements at widely spaced locations – but he saw t
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3.1 Theorising situations

This unit explores the processes through which we comprehend the world around us. When it comes to understanding and explaining the way that social life operates, social scientists draw from a conceptual tool kit, just as we possess a conceptual tool kit for watching a movie or as a spectator at any sports event. There are times when all human beings feel that something appears to be plausible or appears to be false and we are quite aware that others would disagree with our own point of view.
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1.4.12 Bad deaths

What about the other end of the spectrum? What constitutes a bad death? Is there less contention about what constitutes a bad death? Extreme pain and discomfort, humiliating dependence and being a burden are obvious, but what about being alone? Many people say they fear dying alone but there are others who would prefer it. Sudden, unexpected deaths are clearly bad for those left behind but are they also bad for those who die in such circumstances? Sudden unexpected deaths used to be considere
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Moths Can Escape Bats By Jamming Sonar
For over 50 million years, bats and moths have been engaged in an evolutionary arms race: bats evolving new tricks to catch moths, and moths developing counter-measures to escape bats. William Conner, a biologist at Wake Forest University, studies this interaction by filming bat attacks. He and his colleagues report on a new weapon in the moth arsenal: the tiger moth's ability to make sounds that interfere with a bat's ability to echolocate its prey. (3:30)
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • identify those aspects of Delacroix’s art that qualify it as ‘Romantic’

  • understand the interplay between classicism and Romanticism in Delacroix’s art

  • appreciate the nature of Delacroix’s fascination with the Oriental and the exotic even before he visited Morocco.


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Week 3--September 12, 2013
Discussion about research methods, evolution, and related topics.
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How a Hurricane is Born - The Science Of Superstorms
A fascinating look at the origins of hurricanes that might hit the Atlantic coast of the US. Suitable for older elementary, middle school, and high school students. (02:29)
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Workshop 3: Conceptual Thinking
In this workshop, the focus is on concept maps as tools for helping students learn. Joseph Novak, Professor of Biological Science, explains how students learn by assimilating new concepts into their already existing frameworks and takes a teacher step-by-step through the design and process of concept mapping. You will see concept maps being used in a variety of ways in m
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2 How active should young people be?

Physical activity in childhood has a range of benefits, including healthy growth and development, maintenance of a healthy weight, mental well-being and learning social skills. It is particularly important for bone health, increasing bone mineral density and preventing osteoporosis in later life. Although there is only indirect evidence (compared with adults) linking physical inactivity in children with childhood health outc
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1.4.10 Unfinished business

When people die suddenly we can never be sure that they have done and said what they want and are able to do. Meg’s long term-illness gave her a lot of time for reflection and preparation, so that while her death was sudden and she was unable to see her younger son, she also had the opportunity for conversations with people about her death. However, there may have been last-minute wishes that Meg was unable to express.

Li’s sudden stroke may have left her with things unsaid, but her
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