Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 9534 result(s) returned

3.4.1 Plant nutrients

Plant nutrients are necessary in varying amounts for the growth, reproduction and well-being of growing plants.

Of the major nutrients of plants, nitrogen and phosphorus are important growth-limiting factors in primary production (i.e. they are likely to run out before any other element needed by the plants). Both nitrogen and phosphorus enter watercourses from natural leaching by water of the soluble nitrates and phosphates found in soils and rocks, as well as from sewage effluent and
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

4.2.5 Focusing

Focusing is done by adjusting the size of the gap between the lens and the light sensor. To get distant objects in focus, the gap needs to be smaller than that required for close objects (see Figure 7 below).

Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to c
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

An integrated system to aid the planning of concrete structures: introducing the system
This paper reports on the development at Loughborough University of a CAD-based integrated model to aid the planning of in-situ concrete structures. The system development started after a review of the planning models currently available and after a detailed questionnaire survey undertaken amongst the top UK and US contractors on the current status of planning techniques and information technology. The main aim of this system i
Author(s): Aouad, G., and Price, A.D.F.

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Children's Heart Running Team Participant
Carla Adkins, top fundraiser for the Children's Heart Running Team, shares why she chose to join the Children's Heart team as part of the Baltimore Running Festival. One in 1,000 children are born with heart disease. Related Links: Maryland Heart Center http://www.umm.edu/heart/ Children's Heart Program http://www.umm.edu/pediatrics/cardiology/index.htm Physicians and Staff http://www.umm.edu/pediatrics/cardiology/card_phys.htm Disease Overviews http://www.umm.edu/pediatrics/cardiology/dise
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

3.5 Presenting a coherent argument

Presenting a coherent argument is closely linked to ‘answering the question’. The essence of an essay is that it sets out to be an argument about the issues raised in the title. Even if you have a lot of good material in it, it will not be judged ‘a good essay’ unless the material is organised so that it hangs together. This implies two things:

  1. You need to sort out your points into groups so that they can be presented in a structured way
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Conclusion

  1. The rate at which water infiltrates into the ground depends on the permeability of the rocks and the state of the ground surface. Below the ground surface there is an unsaturated zone which has air in the pore spaces, and a saturated zone which has all the pores filled with water. The water table is the boundary between the unsaturated zone and the saturated zone, and is the level at which water stands in wells. Water below the water table is called groundwa
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Copyright © 2016 The Open University

5.1 Actions for lighter living

Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do little.

(Edmund Burke, 1729–1797)

If you want to consider how to further lighten your carbon footprint, you may need more detailed information on the effect of technical and behavioural actions not covered by the carbon calculator, or included only as a part of other actions.

It's important to understand whic
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Challenges for charitable investors
Elroy Dimson, BGI Professor of Investment Management, talks about philanthropic and charitable investors, and the unique challenges they face in the current economic climate.

1.5 Napier and Briggs

The fact remains that few mathematical inventions have burst on the world so unexpectedly as Napier's logarithms. Although various disparate strands – the idea of doing multiplication via addition, the idea of comparing arithmetic and geometric progressions, the use of the concept of motion – had all been floated at some stage, the enthusiasm with which Napier's work was received makes it clear both that this was perceived as a novel invention and that it fulfilled a pressing need. Foremo
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • identify strengths and weaknesses as a writer of fiction

  • demonstrate a general awareness of fiction writing

  • discuss fiction using basic vocabulary.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • list the skills and knowledge needed to conduct full and fair recruitment and selection

  • undertake full and fair recruitment and selection systematically.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

5.2.1 Technical and usable accessibility

An online resource needs to be usable for disabled users as well as accessible. Lawton Henry (2002) makes the distinction between ‘technical accessibility’ and ‘usable accessibility’. We will illustrate this distinction with two examples.

  1. In a web-based example, a blind user listening to a screen reader may technically be able to access the data presented in a table, i.e. the screen reader may be able to read the content of each cell in
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Copyright © 2016 The Open University

5.4 Protein–protein interactions

You should by now be beginning to appreciate the importance of protein–protein interactions in different cellular processes. Indeed, such interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process, e.g. DNA replication, transcription, translation, control of the cell cycle, signal transduction, secretory and metabolic processes.

There are three main types of protein–protein interaction, termed surface–string, helix–helix and surface–surface interactions (Author(s): The Open University

2 Terminology: patients or people?

In this unit ‘the patient’ has been referred to on several occasions. One reason is the universal usage of the term and the ease with which it is understood. To identify someone as a patient immediately situates them as someone in receipt of medical treatment. However, the term itself is not without difficulty, as sociologists critical of medicine have been quick to point out, since it carries associations of power and authority.

Labelling theory is a useful concept that assesses h
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

11 Conclusion

Any assessment of Robert Owen is bound to be partial, because there are some gaps in our knowledge about both the man and his agenda. But we have seen the close links between his personal experience as an enlightened employer and the social philosophy presented in the essays, which found its ultimate expression in the community scheme and mutual cooperation.

Owen's most important ideas about character formation underpinned much of this philosophy. He has rightly been condemned for much
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

3.5 The principles underlying ethical practice

Box 3 describes four principles that are central to an understanding of acting ethically.

Box 3 The principles of acting ethically

Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

1.8 The OU requirements

The criteria for an OU PhD (as stated in the Guidelines on Research Degree Examinations for Heads of Disciplines, Supervisors and Examination Panels, EX 10, revised January 1998) are that:

The thesis must be of good presentation style and show evidence of being a significant contribution knowledge and of the student's capacity to pursue further research without supervision. The thesis must contain
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able:

  • describe New Labour's approach to Welfare Reconstruction.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477