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6.1 Introduction

The process of keeping up-to-date in your chosen subject area is useful for your studies and afterwards, for your own personal satisfaction, or perhaps in your career as part of your continuing professional development.

There are a great many tools available that make it quite easy to keep yourself up to date. You can set them up so that the information comes to you, rather than you having to go out on the web looking for it. Over the next few pages, you will be experimenting with some
Author(s): The Open University

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Module team


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2.5 Bookmarking websites

Most browsers allow you to keep a record of links to websites that you have found useful. These are called 'Bookmarks' in Firefox and 'Favorites' in Internet Explorer, and may have other names, such as a 'Hot List', in other browsers. For convenience I've chosen to call them bookmarks. Browsers usually offer the facility for organising the bookmarks into folders and sub-folders so that you can keep track of them as your collection grows.

You may well have a collection of bookmarks alrea
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3.8 Revision questions

Question 1

Discuss the two ways in which the middle ear increases the effectiveness with which sound is transmitted from the external ear to the inner ear.

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Introduction

How does the board of governors of a school work? This unit looks at the roles of Chair of Governors, Vice-chair and Clerk to the board and examines how the workload can be shared between the members. The governing body should focus on the quality and delivery of education provided by the school, not on daily management.


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China and India's marriage squeeze


Author(s): The Economist

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Rights not set

IPL: Nancy Longnecker "Effective Science Communication - a scientific approach
Professor Nancy Longnecker delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 15th of September 2015. Nancy's journey from Biologist to communicator to researcher in Sciecne communication has been a fascinating one, and her current work in evaluation of science communication experiences is vital in validating, fine-tuning and and sometimes revolutionising the field.
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1 Dividing the planet

A good globe can set you back quite a lot of money. Of course, I don't mean the little moulded plastic planets or the globes you can blow up as if the world were a beach ball, but the decent sized ones that sit solidly on turned wooden bases and quietly emanate authority from the corner of a room. Yet these days, it hardly seems worthwhile making such an investment. Countries appear to change their colour, their shape or their name with remarkable rapidity.

It has become a cliché to po
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Why History Matters: A Panel Discussion || Radcliffe Institute
Historians Joyce Antler, Nancy F. Cott, Thavolia Glymph, Linda Gordon, Linda K. Kerber, and Alice Kessler-Harris take questions from the audience and each other during a panel discussion about US women's history and Gerda Lerner (1920--2013), who was a singular force in developing the field.
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Seminar 15- USAWC Distance Education Class of 2011
One more challenge faced the senior officers as they celebrated completion of two years of internet-based studies at the Army War College's distance education program. The largest graduation class in college history received their diplomas on a day of record-breaking heat, July 22, at historic Carlisle Barracks.
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2.2 1 Social Darwinism and eugenics

Nineteenth century reformers combined their new medical diagnoses with a concern to tackle what they saw as the social causes of cruelty and incapacity. Two theories dominated: social Darwinism and eugenics.

Social Darwinism drew on Darwin's ideas of natural selection and emphasised the contribution of the fittest and most superior individuals to the survival of the human species. The social Darwinists, who included some of the most prominent thinkers of their time, believed that social
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1 Introduction and overview

This unit is concerned with the very things that we, as ordinary people, talk about as a consequence of listening to radio, watching television or reading newspapers and magazines: the programmes and articles that constitute media output. We do not (except on rare occasions) experience celebrities face-to-face, as their celebrity is conditional on having their image disseminated far and wide. This unit examines the everyday evidence of celebrity activity – what academic media analyst
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5.4 Inclusion and exclusion

Contemporary Europe is, like that of earlier times, divided on several counts and reflects the continuing existence of several major identities. Individuals and groups invariably have several, overlapping or nested, identities at the same time. But there is also a hierarchy of different identities, with some groups having preferential access to particular European values and resources and others being partly or wholly excluded from them. Contemporary patterns of inclusion and exclusion
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5.3 Tradition and transformation

Identification of specifically European traditions, such as that of a European system of values, is no easy task. Europe arrogated the Christian faith to itself, but it was hardly in Europe that it originated and the practice of Christianity has never been restricted just to Europe. Modern Europe also identified itself with traditions of civilization, progress and a general superiority over other cultures and peoples, although European practice and the ends to which its growing power was put
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Getting Started: 03 Importing and exporting images
Get images in and out of Fireworks. Open Photoshop files with layer comps. Save files in multiple formats. Export Fireworks files.
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1.4.1 PROMPT

There is so much information available on the internet on every topic imaginable. But how do you know if it is any good? And if you find a lot more information than you really need, how do you decide what to keep and who to discard?

In this section we are going to introduce a simple checklist to help you to judge the quality of the information you find. Before we do this, spend a few minutes thinking about what is meant by information quality.

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Virtual Maths - Numbers, 2D Rectangle simulation tool
Interactive simulation tool demonstrating the formula for calculating the area of a 2D rectangle
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

6.6 Long-term energy scenarios

To begin to understand the range of long-term future possibilities, let us look briefly at two major studies of future sustainable energy options, the first addressing the UK situation, the second taking a world perspective.


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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence. This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to
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