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4.4 Using information

Our use of information is often biased in important regards. First, we pay more attention to information that is easily available (the availability heuristic). Second, we overweight memories which are more easily retrievable – usually because they are emotionally vivid or have personal relevance (the retrievability heuristic).

We pay selective attention to information, often in a self-serving way. We will often give greater weight to information which shows us in a favou
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2.3 IT and you

Sometimes it's useful to stop and think a bit about your own experiences and focus on your own views. This can help you understand issues in more depth. For example, when studying the impact of IT on everyday life, your own experiences are a useful resource.

Activity 4

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There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from on a range of subjects. 

Find out mo
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2.2.2 Energy and conservation

Newtonian mechanics is concerned with explaining motion, yet it contains within it the much simpler idea that some things never change. Take the concept of mass, for example, which appears throughout Newtonian mechanics, including the law of gravitation. In Newtonian mechanics, mass is conserved. This means that the mass of the Universe is constant and the mass of any specified collection of particles is constant, no matter how much rearrangement occurs within the system. A chemist might take
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#390: The human cost of hate: The lasting damage caused by homophobia and transphobia

Psychiatric epidemiologist Professor Michael King discusses the devastating psychological harm suffered by victims of homophobia and transphobia. He also examines the role of families, governments and religion in curbing the problem. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

 


Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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Rights not set

4.3.1 Confidentiality, integrity and availability

To preserve the value of an information asset, an organisation needs to sustain simultaneously its scarcity and its shareability within their respective regions. This is the critical high-level information security goal for any information asset; it is the entire rationale of an information security management system.

To maintain the security of an information asset, an organisation must:

  • either make the information asset unavailable in it
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • provide a range of definitions of corporate governance

  • identify issues usually addressed by corporate governance structures

  • summarise recent scandals and abuses and the regulatory reaction

  • identify the other drivers of corporate governance, such as capital markets, shareholders and rating agencies.


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MEPO 3/374 - ALFRED SOLOMON charged with the wilful murder of BARNET BLITZ (Image 7)

The National Archives UK posted a photo:

MEPO 3/374 - ALFRED SOLOMON charged with the wilful murder of BARNET BLITZ (Image 7)

Correspondence fro
Author(s): nobody@flickr.com (The National Archives UK)

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https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/

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Easy Integration of Science and Music
Students create a rondo using concepts they learned in science.  Questions to ConsiderSee Ms. Griffin reinforce science learning into her music lesson with this easy, effective idea. Beyond the focus on core subjects, why is it helpful to make such cross-curricular connections?How could this cross-curricular idea be applied to any subject area? (05:17))
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5.2 Evaluating the quality of information on the Web

The quality of the information you will find on the Web varies enormously as there is no editorial control. Anybody can establish a website, claiming to be whoever they want to be. As Mark Twain put it:

A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

So how can you judge the reliability and quality of the information you find on the Web? If you think in t
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4.12 The implications of gender differences in communication

Activity 20

0 hours 20 minutes

If it were true that men and women tend to communicate in very different ways, what might be the implications for health and social
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4.2 Carbon reduction targets

Let's now look at carbon footprint reduction targets in a bit more detail.

The first international agreement to set carbon reduction targets was the 1997 United Nations Kyoto Protocol, which requires developed countries to reduce their human-generated greenhouse gas emissions by an average of just over 5% on 1990 levels by 2008 to 2012. By the time the treaty came into force in 2005, only the USA and Australia had refused to sign. (A new Australian government finally signe
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7 Giving structure to thinking

Two common thinking problems are: a feeling of not being able to 'see the wood for the trees', and difficulty in being logical and orderly. The key to solving them is being able to think about ideas and information in a conceptual and systematic way so that you have ways to structure your thinking. This can involve:

  • looking at the broader context

  • developing mental models and frameworks to hang ideas and information on

  • bein
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6.1 A difficult evolutionary transition

Before going any further, click on 'View document' below and read pages 78-79 and 82-83 from Douglas Palmer's Atlas of the Prehistoric World.

View document

As we saw in Section 3, the move out of water on to land
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1.2 Guidance on note taking

When taking notes the first thing you have to consider is what the notes are going to be used for, since notes taken for one purpose may not be suitable for another.

Here are some possibilities:

  • to help you understand the information;

  • to help you remember the information;

  • to help you explain the information to someone else;

  • to highlight the points that will be useful in an assignment;

  • to
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1.1 1 Why include a global dimension in science education?

Western science drew on a world heritage, on the basis of sharing ideas.

Sen (2002)

The global dimension refers to approaches to education … which focus on global issues, events and interdependence. … pupils will develop … an understanding of different cultural and political perspectives, as well as knowledge of
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Acknowledgements

Course image: Jim Nix in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

This content is made availabl
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Introduction

This unit is from our archive and it is an adapted extract from Human Biology and Health (SK220) which is no longer in presentation. If you wish to study formally at The Open University, you may wish to explore the courses we offer in this curriculum area .

This unit looks at the human being in the context of an individual life
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Civilisation: Who decides? Heritage and the fabrication of history
Leading architectural historian Dr Simon Thurley looks at the growing role of the state in the cultural life of the nation in the 40th Anniversary Gerald Walter's Memorial Lecture
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