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2 Effective recruitment and selection
Does the recruitment and selection process fill you with dread? Discrimination and equal opportunities legislation can make this area feel like a minefield. If you are faced with appointing a new employee, then this unit will provide a straight-forward guide to the process: from writing job descriptions to finally assessing who to appoint.
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Activity 8: Exploring cultural dimensions on Hofstede's website
We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both.
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Activity 7: Hofstede's way of thinking about national culture
We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both.
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4.2 A process perspective on organisations

The overall transformation process can be broken down into a series of micro-processes. Attention to processes within organisations can provide a powerful tool for understanding organisational performance. In the extract below, David Garvin discusses how attention to work processes can yield new insights for managers about the ways in which performance may be improved.


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2.2 Postscript

A headline-grabbing weekend of ‘midsummer madness’, when six murders occurred in (parts of) Glasgow over the weekend of 5–6 August 1995, reinforced the ongoing nature of contestation and debate about the issues discussed in the programme. As noted in The Scotsman (8 August 1995), the legacy of the imagery of No Mean City was quickly resurrected by the press – for example, ‘a darker side to that much-vaunted transformation of Glasgow from No Mean City to Cultu
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2.1 How the programme progresses

The programme takes the form of a visit to Glasgow. We talked to people and asked about their image(s) of Glasgow and whether these had changed – what was the ‘old’ image; what is the ‘new’; how has it changed; what will it be like in another ten years?

The five main participants have different experiences of Glasgow and these are represented in the images which they hold and aspects of the city's character which they highlight. The themes and ideas behind the progra
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1.3 Constructing a new image

The image ‘Glasgow's miles better’ was deliberately constructed by the City Council, avowedly to make Glaswegians feel better about Glasgow but in fact largely on behalf of business. But it begged a question – ‘miles better for whom?’ Certainly, the city centre was better for shoppers and visitors and the new roads were literally ‘miles better’ for motorists, but the spiralling problems of the housing schemes provided stark counter-images. In other words, as with
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1.2 The hard side of Glasgow

Prior to its currently projected image of dynamism, Glasgow was regarded as the place which best illustrated all that was wrong with the modern industrial city: ‘Once called the “second city of the British Empire” because of its size and industrial might, Glasgow had sunk so low that even the locals disdained it’ (Bryson, 1989).

Figure 2
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3 Making photographs that make demands: stories from the oil industry

There are strong links between the audio files in Activity 2 and the series of photographs in Activity 1. The discussion on the audio and the content of Activity 1 show how debates on the activities of the oil industry have become part of the public domain. The audio explores stories about people who have worked in the oil industry, or whose lives have been affected by
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2.3 Activity 1: Discussion

Responding to the way in which the content and style of photographs are so often limited by the production and distribution processes of the mass media, Owen Logan uses digital technology to produce a new way of seeing the oil industry. As you can see, many of his pictures are made by digitally splicing separate photographs together. The effects of these montages are in part about the relationship between what is put together. For example, to me Logan's use of a photograph of an oil platform
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4.1 National identities and UK politics

Why do British people speak ‘English’ and not ‘British’? Why is it easier to travel from London to any British city than to travel from Bedford to Leamington Spa? Why are the National Gallery, the British Museum and Tate Modern all in London? Why does London house the Stock Exchange? This has to do with the pivotal role played by England in the constitution of the UK and by the designation of London as the capital of the UK.

Within any given country, we are likely to b
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3.2 Sub-state forms of nationalism

The advancement of democracy in contemporary Western nation-states and the intensification of globalisation processes have encouraged the re-emergence of nationalist movements representing oppressed or silenced nations that demand the right to self-determination. In the case of ethnic groups formed by people of immigrant origin, democracy has provided them with the tools to pursue the right to develop and practice their indigenous culture and language alongside those of the host country. One
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1 The politics of devolution

This unit examines the politics of devolution and the relationships between the various nations that constitute the UK. It does so by examining the transformation of the UK from a centralised unitary state into a decentralised unitary state. (If you want a quick summary of the terms of devolution, you will find one in Section 5.5.) The unit shows how the devolution process grew out of a long history, and how it is continuing in the c
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8 Part B: Evidencing your problem-solving skills

This Part requires you to present an example of your work to show that you can explore a problem and follow it through to completion. For example, setting up a project to monitor landfill and associated pollution levels; or developing and implementing a work rota for a care unit to cover 24 hours, 7 days per week with on-call facilities.

The example you select to evidence your skills in problem solving must meet the criteria in
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7.1 Evidence required

Part A is about showing you can develop a strategy for using and improving your skills in problem solving, that you can monitor your progress and can evaluate your performance and strategy overall. The evidence you present must show what you have done as you worked through the processes of planning strategically, monitoring, evaluating and presenting your work. Part A must relate directly to the work you have selected for Part B.

You must present evidence to show you can:


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6 What you should present

This assessment unit has two parts. Part A requires you to show what you did to plan, monitor, evaluate and reflect upon your skills, and present evidence of that process. Part B requires you to select concise examples of your work that demonstrate what you did as you applied skills and techniques to tackle problems. Together the two parts form a portfolio of your achievements. You can use the guidance, Bookmarks and Skills Sheets included in the OpenLearn unit U529_1 Key skills
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1 Developing your problem solving skills

This Key Skill Assessment Unit offers an opportunity for you to select and prepare work that demonstrates your key skills in the area of problem solving.

This unit provides you with advice and information on how to go about presenting your key skills work as a portfolio.

In presenting work that demonstrates your key skills you are taking the initiative to show that you can develop and improve a particular set of skills, and are able to use your skills more generally in your studi
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4.5.1 Lewis structures

G.N. Lewis used the shared electron-pair bond to re-express structural formulae in an electronic form. Examples appeared in Figure 28, where the sharing leads to Lewis structures in which each atom has the shell structure of a noble gas.


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