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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

All other materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.

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References

Bain, P. and Taylor, P. (2004) No Passage to India? UK Unions, Globalisation and the Migration of Call Centre Jobs, Work, Employment and Society Conference 1–3 September 2004, Manchester.
Cowe, R. and Porritt, J. (2002) Government's Business: Enabling corporate sustainability. London: Forum for the Future.
Knox, S. and Maklan, S. (2004), ‘Corporate Soc
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Multiple Sclerosis - Cranial Nerves Exam - Trigeminal (CN V) Sub-exam - Patient 21
This is a 52-year-old white male with a history of bilateral optic neuritis presenting in his twenties who now reports polyextremity sensory motor disturbance. He also has diabetes. The patient reports bilateral upper and right lower extremity sensory and motor disturbance with a band-like sensation about his torso for the past 1-2 months.
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3.1 Codes of conduct

One of the principles of the European Union Emissions Trading System discussed by Schultz and Williamson (2005) is that an organisation accepts responsibility for the performance of their suppliers. In an age where multinational corporations are able to reduce the production costs of their goods and services by offshoring it to whoever can meet the specification at the lowest cost, what responsibility do they have for the conditions under which production actually occurs?

One of the fir
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1.1 Globalisation

Globalisation is something we tend to take for granted, mostly in the form of the remarkably low prices we pay for our consumer goods. When the first pocket calculator was launched in the UK in 1972, it cost £79 plus tax, an amount close to the average monthly take home pay.

Ten years later came the original IBM PC. Replete with a 4.77 MHz processor, 64kB RAM, a 12″ monochrome monitor (and an optional floppy disk drive!), it carried a UK price tag in excess of £1500, at
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will:

  • understand the need for organisations to acknowledge the influence of their environments and the impact that they in turn as organisations have on those environments.

Introduction

‘Environment’ is one of the more popular words in the management lexicon, most generally understood to be referring to ‘something outside’. But common usage today often interprets the Environment (with or without the capital ‘E’) as referring to the planetary ecosystem. On that basis the Environment includes such things as global warming, the state of the ozone layer, deforestation and the means of energy generation. Organisations need to coexist with their environm
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Unit Image

Esthr: www.flickr.com/photos/edyson/274977240/

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More Self Study English
This is a course for Dutch (Bachelor) students who need or want to pay some extra attention to their English language skills. In this course you will find four modules with theory and exercises on Listening, Grammar, Vocabulary and Writing. We will also give you links to useful websites. We strongly recommend that you do not try to do this course in as short a time as possible: learning skills takes time, so you will benefit optimally from the course if you spend weeks, rather than days on it.
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by-nc-sa http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should:

  • understand the nature of entrepreneurship;

  • understand the function of the entrepreneur in the successful, commercial application of innovations;

  • confirm your entrepreneurial business idea;

  • identify personal attributes that enable best use of entrepreneurial opportunities;

  • explore entrepreneurial leadership and management style;

  • identify the requirements for building an
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Acknowledgements

The unit has been adapted for OpenLearn by The Open University Business School from The Open University course B713 Fundamentals of Senior Management.

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Sh
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Glancing ahead
This unit explores reasons for studying mathematics, practical applications of mathematical ideas and aims to help you to recognise mathematics when you come across it. It introduces the you to the graphics calculator, and takes you through a series of exercises from the Calculator Book, Tapping into Mathematics With the TI-83 Graphics Calculator. The unit ends by asking you to reflect on the process of studying mathematics. In order to complete this unit you will need to have obtained a Texas I
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Recognizing mathematics, continued
This unit explores reasons for studying mathematics, practical applications of mathematical ideas and aims to help you to recognise mathematics when you come across it. It introduces the you to the graphics calculator, and takes you through a series of exercises from the Calculator Book, Tapping into Mathematics With the TI-83 Graphics Calculator. The unit ends by asking you to reflect on the process of studying mathematics. In order to complete this unit you will need to have obtained a Texas I
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Acknowledgements

The unit has been adapted for OpenLearn by The Open University Business School from The Open University course B713: Fundamentals of Senior Management

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlik
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General Introduction to Linguistic Science I
This course is designed as a general introduction to the scientific study of human language within the broader context of modern cognitive science.
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Twitter For Educators
Twitter for educators provides good logic on why educators should use Twitter and how it can help them form a community, share resources, and meet people worldwide. This is a great resource to enhance technology instruction in the classroom and is an effective tool for school to home communication. (7:51)
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Acknowledgements

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence, see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following:

Figures

Figur
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions). this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful thanks is made to the pupils and staff of: The Henley College, Oxon; Langtree School, Woodcote, Oxon and The Hill Primary School, E
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Tech Ed North America: Kate Gregory - Modern Native C++ Development for Maximum Productivity

Kate Gregory presents Modern Native C++ Development for Maximum Productivity at Tech Ed North America 2011. Go Kate!

This session clarifies what features are in Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 and what is yet to come. It illustrates how new constructs such as lambda expressions enable better use of existing libraries and how your code can be simpler, safer and faster all at the same time. Also, s
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • develop an appreciation of the huge variety of different mammals that exist on Earth today;

  • see how fossil evidence can help us to understand evolutionary history;

  • understand how the structure of DNA can help us to detect differences between different species;

  • apply the techniques of DNA analysis to work out which mammals are most closely related to each other;

  • appreciate t
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