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5 Summary

At the time of writing (2006) a relatively small number of types of GM crop have been grown globally, in a limited number of countries. The take-up of these crops has been relatively high in countries like the USA and Canada, but very much lower in Europe. However, there is a very rapid increase in the growth of GM crops in developing countries.

The technique most commonly used to introduce new genetic material into dicots has involved the use of a modified soil bacterium, Agrobacter
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2.7.4 Telling the time

To ask the time, you say:

Quelle heure est-il? What time is it?

When telling the time, you use the expression il est…

For full hours:

Il est une heure.

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1.7 Establishing boundaries

Activity 6 Managing the hidden culture

0 hours 15 minutes

Imagine now that you are Marie's manager and you decide to call in at the unit on your way back from a day out. You ofte
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Autism and Minds Wired for Science: ethical implications [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor John Dupré, Dr Bonnie Evans | Our panel will offer perspectives from neuroscience, history and philosophy on autism: How has our understanding of autism evolved? Why is autism so often linked with scientific and mathematical talent? Does this mean that some minds are ‘wired’ for science (and others not)? Is autism really a disorder, or just an aspect of human ‘neurodiversity’? Simon Baron-Cohen (@sbaroncohen) is Professor of Development
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1.4 Broadly typical phases of PhD research

A modern PhD can be viewed as having three key phases (very roughly, but not strictly, corresponding to the three years of a full-time degree), each of which contributes a necessary element of mastery:

  1. Orientation – mastering the literature and formulating a research problem and plan.

  2. Intensive research – gathering the evidence to support the thesis, whether empirical or theoretical.

  3. Entering t
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4.6 The Terror in action

The year of authorised state terror from July 1793 to July 1794 was ‘the climactic year of the Revolution’ (Palmer, 1971, p. 113). Under the Committee of Public Safety, now including Robespierre, ‘revolutionary tribunals’, backed in every commune by a ‘revolutionary committee’ or ‘watch committee’ (comité de surveillance), were set up throughout France, staffed by members of the local Jacobin clubs and the sans-culottes to root out counter-revolutionaries, real
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1.3.5 Images

Images can also be found online. Some useful image databases are:

British Library Images Online Images from two millennia of world history. The collection includes images of people, natural history, religion, conflict, travel and exploration, and social history. There are free samp
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2 Schemes run by Swansea Cyrenians in 1999

A hostel, which provided accommodation for 13 people, predominantly men, in individual rooms and an overflow shed. It was run in partnership with the Family Housing Association. Three-quarters of its funding came from the Welsh Assembly, and a quarter from the local authority.

Another important source of revenue was Housing Benefit, through which residents were able to pay their accommodation charges. This varied enormously. Residents classified as ‘vulnerable’, like those with ment
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Say what you see
Try describing this picture.  If you are just beginning, try finding nouns to name the different items you see in the picture?  How about some adjectives?  Do you know the […]

Introduction

This unit is from our archive and it is an adapted extract from Digital Communications (T305) which is no longer in presentation. If you wish to study formally at The Open University, you may wish to explore the courses we offer in this curriculum area.

By using optical fibre, very high data rates (gigabits per second
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Elephant in niche DP033958

*

Elephant Tea Rooms, 64 - 66 Fawcett Street, Sunderland. Elephant in niche.
© Historic England


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3.6 3.6 Summary

  • Since the heyday of the centralised nation state in the 1930s and 1940s, most of Europe's regions have grown increasingly more important in economic, political and/or cultural terms.

  • This growth has been largely in response to regional inequalities in economic development, threats to traditional regional cultures, and the political federalisation of states, whether to reduce their centralised power or to contain regional separatisms.


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    Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 LicenceCopyright © 2

2.4.1 Archaeological evidence

This feels in some ways like the most ‘real’ source – where you can almost touch the Classical world, and where you get a sense of what the Classical world looked like. Classical archaeology covers a wide range of areas: not just buildings like the Parthenon or the temples at Paestum, but also cities, landscapes, graves, coins, battlefields, everyday items, plant and animal remains, ancient rubbish and much else. Archaeology often throws up evidence where literature doesn't. People, aft
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1 The Chinese Welfare Association's Carer Support Project, Belfast

This audio unit features a project that was set up in Northern Ireland specifically to support Chinese carers. It is one of several projects being run by the Chinese Welfare Association in Belfast at that time.

The Chinese Welfare Association

The Chinese Welfare Association is a voluntary orga
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Chaos and the Art of Visualising Complexity
Professor Michael Field, from Imperial College London, address the question of what chaos is (and is not) and how one can visualise and describe the general mathematics of chaos and complex dynamics. It will also include some striking images of chaos and numerical demonstrations.
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Lesson 02 - One Minute Luxembourgish
In lesson 02 of One Minute Luxembourgish you will learn a few more useful words in Luxembourgish which you'll use every day. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Languages at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Luxembourgish is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.
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References

The Belfast Agreement (1998) London, The Stationery Office.
Burgess, M. and Gagnon, A.G. (1993) Comparative Federalism and Federation, London, Harvester Wheatsheaf.
Colley, L. (1992) Britons: Forging the Nation 1707–1837, London, Vintage.
Cooke, P., Christiansen, T. and Schienstock, G. (1997) ‘Regional economi
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • explain the key components of project closure and their importance

  • plan an effective project closure

  • ensure that the project activities have been completed

  • recognise problems that may need to be resolved at the closure stage

  • contribute to evaluating a project.


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1.2 The formation of NHS trusts

Figure 2.6

6.4 Rapid-response genes and rhythmic neuronal activity

Reactive changes in the brain are usually marked by changes in neuronal electrical activity. If these changes are to be of long duration, adjustments in neuronal electrical behaviour may be made through changes in gene expression. Rapid-response genes (sometimes called ‘immediate-early’ genes) are activated within minutes of the onset of such sustained electrical activity. These genes are master controls, acting as a gateway to a series of linked events: alteration of electrical firing pa
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