Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 9007 result(s) returned

9 Conclusion

This course started with the idea that computers have become an important part of everyday life, especially when all the ‘invisible’ computers that surround us are taken into account – those embedded in objects such as kitchen scales and digital cameras.

Three fundamental ideas introduced in this course are:

  • computers comprise both hardware (the physical objects) and software (the programs);

  • computers receive data from th
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Java Graphics
R.G. (Dick) Baldwin
This Book contains a series of tutorials showing how to create graphics using Java.
Some Rights Reserved

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

COMP2211: Planning, Scenarios, Storyboards
COMP2211: Planning, Scenarios, Storyboards - UNSPECIFIED Keywords:UNSPECIFIED
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

4.4 Coal in the European Union

The EU's coal reserves in 2004, after enlargement to 25 member states, stood at 100 × 109 t. Table 3 shows the eight European Union Member States with the most significant reserves ranked in order of greatest tonnage. With a little over 100 × 10 9 t of coal of all ranks, the EU possesses approxima
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • conduct searches efficiently and effectively

  • find references to material in bibliographic databases

  • make efficient use of full text electronic journals services

  • critically evaluate information from a variety of sources

  • understand the importance of organising information.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Point estimation
This free course looks at point estimation, that is, the estimation of the value of the parameter of a statistical model by a single number, a point estimate for the parameter. Section 1 develops some aspects of maximum likelihood estimation. In particular, you will find out how to obtain the maximum likelihood estimator of an unknown parameter, using calculus. You will need to do lots of differentiation in this section. Section 2 introduces a number of important properties of point estimation.<
Author(s): Creator not set

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

References

Brassington, F. and Pettitt, S. (2000) Principles of Marketing, 2nd edn, England, Pearson Education Limited.
Christopher, M., Payne, A. F. T. and Ballantyne, D. (1991) Relationship Marketing: Bringing quality, customer service and marketing together, Oxford, Butterworth Heinemann.
Curtis, J. (2000) ‘A clear view of CRM’, Marketing Direct, No. 50, pp. 4
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

4.3 Genes and ageing

It is often assumed that ageing is genetically determined, because each species has a characteristic, well-defined maximum lifespan.
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • lay out and, where appropriate, label simple mathematical arguments

  • understand the precise mathematical meaning of certain common English words

  • understand and use common mathematical symbols

  • write clear, unambiguous mathematical solutions using appropriate notation

  • identify and modify some sources of ambiguity or inappropriate use of notation in a mathematical solution.
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Mathematics. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

7.5.2 Title

Being able to understand and use a range of numerical, graphical, algebraic and other mathematical techniques is a central feature of number skills. Use the following list to help you identify the areas you may need to work on. Will you need to:

  • make observations, measurements, and express and combine the units of measurement correctly?

  • read and interpret scale drawings, graphs, tables and charts? If so, do you need to learn about the
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.2 Generativity and duality of patterning

Let us now reconsider the sentence you heard in the imaginary scenario at the beginning of this course. Here it is again.

  • (1)  My dad's tutor's no joker, and he told me the TMA's going to hit home with a bang.

Activity 2


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

4.1 Scientific management

Frederick Winslow Taylor, who is often regarded as the father of modern management, was an engineer, born of a wealthy Pennsylvanian family. He was expected to go into the law or some other genteel profession: instead he preferred to work on the shop floor. As he reflected on his experiences as a foreman in the Midvale Steel Works, he concluded that the workers knew more about the actual processes they were working on than their managers did. Workers could tell stories about why things were t
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

KGNU Radio Interview
Description not set
Author(s): borisdom

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Teen Bead Montessori Materials
Trying to improve your child's math skills? Learn how Montessori
teachers explain the concept of teen numbers in this free educational
video clip about Montessori math methods.

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

1.8.1 Making and using field sketches

How do we start to make sense of a rock exposure? Drawing a sketch is one of the best ways to start, as it forces you to notice many aspects of the exposure. It also helps you to build up a picture of which aspects are significant and which are incidental or even irrelevant to a geological study. The aim of a field sketch is that it provides a record of your observations (along with notes taken at the same time, and also perhaps a photograph to record details). A sketch is complementary to a
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Passeport informatique TC (PIT)
Sommaire : Ch.1 : Introduction aux systèmes d'exploitation Ch.2 : Le shell Unix - bases Ch.3 : Architecture PC - Ch.4 : Outils du Département - Ch.5 : Utilisation de vi - Ch.6 : Introduction à l'algorithmique et au langage C - Ch.7 : Editer, compiler, executer - Documents de référence.
Author(s): Laforest, Frédérique,Augé-Blum, Isabelle,Fleury

License information
Related content

Electronique internet . Cette ressource est la propriété de ses auteurs et de l'INSA de Lyon.

1 Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes

The main teaching text of this course is provided in the workbook below. The answers to the exercises that you'll find throughout the workbook are given in the answer book. You can access it by clicking on the link under the workbook. When prompted to watch the video for this course, return to this page and watch the clips below. After you've watched the clips, return to the workbook.

Click the link below to open the workbook (PDF, 0.6 MB).

Author(s): The Open University

1.4 The discovery of tidal heating

The Voyager fly-bys of the Jupiter system convinced planetary scientists that former preconceptions about 'dead' globes were wrong - even before Voyager 1 had got as far as Saturn, the mission had enabled them to identify a new heating mechanism to explain the discrepancies. The ease with which this revolution in thought was brought about was thanks to some of the Voyager images of Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite. Io is only a fraction larger and denser than the Moon, and so by rig
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

References

American Heart Association (2006) ‘Heart disease and stroke statistics – 2006 update: A report from the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee’, Circulation, 113, pp. e85–e151.
Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451