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Are Obama & Romney Different on Economic Policy?
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4.6 P is for Provenance

The provenance of a piece of information (i.e. who produced it? where did it come from?) may provide another useful clue to its reliability. It represents the 'credentials' of a piece of information that support its status and perceived value. It is therefore very important to be able to identify the author, sponsoring body or source of your information.

Why is this important?

Author(s): The Open University

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Find Those Gleamers
The CyberSquad uses algebra to figure out how many gleamers they need and how many power glows are produced by each gleamer as they must power up a Cyberspace ship in this video from Cyberchase.
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How the Common Core with Change the Expectations for Students
Sally Hampton, Chair for the ELA College and Career Readiness Standards Work Group, briefly explains how the expectations with change for students along with they ways they will be assessed.  (01:20)
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Design and Creativity
We encounter designed products every day, from bus tickets to buildings. We travel on, wear and even eat products that have been designed. What it is like to be a designer? What are the design processes that generate products? The 28 video tracks on this album reveal the importance of creativity in the design process and explore the products and practices of both new and highly experienced designers working in the international design world. Designers from Philips and IDEO explain how they formu
Author(s): The iTunes U team

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

VUCast: Vanderbilt Research
In the latest VUCast: Learn what Neanderthal genes are doing to you, where you can find a three-year eclipse, and what's inside an ancient Wari empire beer. Watch now!
Author(s): Vanderbilt News and Communications

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A special report on Europe and its currency

Author(s): The Economist

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7.2 Selected to survive: studies of the PNS

Viktor Hamburger carried out a series of classic embryologieal experiments over a period of about 30 years. He investigated the relationship between the size of target tissue in chick embryos and the size of the pool of neurons that innervated it. His technique was to remove or add target tissue to the tissue which would eventually form a limb, usually the hind limb, and is called the limb bud. A few days later he observed the effect of the tissue addition or removal on the pool of neurons de
Author(s): The Open University

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5.2 Material comparisons

I want to depart from the specific example of the bicycle to make some more general points.

In most simple structural analysis the self-weight of the structure is ignored, as it is considered to be small in comparison with the loads carried. However, as an illustration of engineering practice in the search for efficient structures to employ in product design, it is worth examining how the strength and weight of particular materials compare.

These comparisons are illustrated throug
Author(s): The Open University

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The Sense of Taste
Do you have good taste? In this video segment, Dr. Linda Bartoshuk
explores the sense of taste in humans -- why we have it, and what
happens when we lose it. Learn why the sense of smell is also important to our experience of food. Footage from NOVA: "Mystery of the Senses: Taste."  Closed captioning included. Run time 04:18.




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Intro to Chemistry: 4.1 Converting Word Equations into Formulaic Equations (1/2)
Join award winning teachers Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams as they interactively teach Chemistry: 4.1: Converting Word Equations into Formulaic Equations.  Diatomic elements are defined and a memory technique for remembering them is given ( BrINClHoF). 
( 7:44)

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9.520-A Networks for Learning: Regression and Classification (MIT)
The course focuses on the problem of supervised learning within the framework of Statistical Learning Theory. It starts with a review of classical statistical techniques, including Regularization Theory in RKHS for multivariate function approximation from sparse data. Next, VC theory is discussed in detail and used to justify classification and regression techniques such as Regularization Networks and Support Vector Machines. Selected topics such as boosting, feature selection and multiclass cla
Author(s): Poggio, Tomaso,Verri, Alessandro

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from on a range of subjects. 

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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence.

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not
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2.3.3 Receptors with intrinsic enzymatic activity

Receptors with intrinsic enzymatic activity are the second biggest group of receptors after the GPCRs. They include four types according to the form of enzymatic activity of the intracellular domain (Figure 23a).

  • Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) On activation, the kinase domain phosphorylates tyrosine amino
    Author(s): The Open University

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3.2 Starting with learning outcomes

Figure 14

The creation of accessible eLearning or online learn
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1.4.2 Protein fold

Protein folds are often very extensive arrangements, combining elements of secondary and supersecondary structure. Some of the most common protein folds are described in Table 4  with examples of proteins that contain them. Notice that proteins can be conveniently divided into three classes, on the basis of the elements of secondary struct
Author(s): The Open University

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1.6.1 Thiamin (or thiamine, also known as vitamin B1)

The deficiency disease beriberi has been known for thousands of years. The name literally means ‘I can't, I can't’ in Sinhalese (a major language in Sri Lanka), and reflects the crippling effect on its victims, who suffer from neurological symptoms, including pain, fatigue and paralysis, and cardiovascular disease. The disease was most common in southeast Asia, where white or ‘polished’ rice was a major part of the diet. The main source of thiamin is in the outer layers of the grain,
Author(s): The Open University

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4.3 Who invented the telephone?

The popular image of Bell inventing the telephone, while it has some truth, is by no means the whole story. The two most significant players in the invention of a practical working telephone were Bell and Elisha Gray.

Gray was the co-owner and chief scientist of a company that manufactured telegraphic equipment. Bell's patent description had sound transmission as a minor purpose. But Gray's caveat declared that the main purpose of his device was ‘to transmit the tones of the human voi
Author(s): The Open University

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Project drift

Project drift is a common problem when one project leads into another without a clear break, or when extra tasks, which were not identified at the beginning, are added to a project. If possible, significant changes of the latter kind should be treated separately as a follow-on project: otherwise they may not be properly resourced and this can have adverse consequences for motivation of the project team.

<
Author(s): The Open University

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