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3.1 Word formulas

A formula is a rule or a generalisation. Word formulas – formulas that use English words rather than mathematical symbols – are so much a part of life that people often use them without realising that they are doing so. Here are some examples.

  • The cost of a purchase of oranges is the price per orange times the number of oranges.

  • The total cost of petrol is the price of petrol per litre times the number of litres.


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1.2.7 In praise of cheap offshore labour?

Claims over the benefits of globalisation and the exploitation of cheap offshore labour generate strong feelings and, not surprisingly, divide opinion between those who favour the global marketplace and its detractors. The issue turns on whether the constant search for ever-cheaper manufacturing and service locations is seen as a good or a bad thing. It may appear odd, at first, to suggest that exploiting the poor of another country can, on any measure, be regarded as a good thing, but
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3.1 Habitat

The environment in which any organism lives is known as its habitat. It will share its habitat with other organisms, that are themselves part of the habitat. A habitat has distinctive physical and chemical features.

Question 4

Can
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Introduction

This unit is from our archive and it is an adapted extract from Digital Communications (T305) which is no longer in presentation. If you wish to study formally at The Open University, you may wish to explore the courses we offer in this curriculum area.

By using optical fibre, very high data rates (gigabits per second
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3.4 Experience – making distinctions based on a tradition and constructing a history

Experience, and learning from experience, will be a major theme throughout this unit. The model of experiential learning developed by David Kolb is increasingly well known and used as a conceptual basis for the design of all sorts of processes from curricula to consultancies (Figure 32
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4.2.4 Verbs

Verbs are the most important words of all, as is suggested by the fact that the verb in both English and Latin is named after the Latin word uerbum, word! Without a verb, a sentence cannot be a proper sentence, or a clause a proper clause. A one-word sentence consists of a verb only, for example, Run!

The ending of a Latin verb shows who the doer of the action of the verb is (which is why there is usually no need of a pronoun to show this). Below are the pres
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2.1.2 The poems

Your reading in this course has already prepared you to some extent, but please read the following poems (both the English and Gaelic versions are given) which are discussed in the recordings, and then listen to the recordings.

 

Kinloch Ainort

A company of mountains, an upthrust of mountains

a great garth of growing mountains

a concourse of summits, of knolls,
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5 Conclusion

This OpenLearn free course an adapted extract from the Open University course A215Creative writing.

‘Writing what you know’ is a large and rich project, one that provides an endless resource, and one that can be undertaken in all the types of writing discussed in this course – poetry, fiction and life writing. The skill lies in reaw
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Introduction

There are many compelling reasons for introducing a global dimension in science education. This unit, aimed at teachers in secondary schools explores why the global dimension in science education is so important and how you might incorporate it in your lessons.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 2 study in Edu
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1.1 What makes a map?

Map 1
Map 1 The Millennium Dome in Greenwich, one of 56,000 photographs taken for the Millennium Map – 2000's answer to the Domesday Book (Source: The Guardian<
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this booklet.

Text

Wilson, J.
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7.2 Reorganizing notes

The technique of re-reading completed notes and supplementing them with comments and queries is a useful way of processing ideas. Another way of processing ideas is to reorganize notes around a set of questions or thematic headings. This is particularly useful for those notes that you will be drawing upon for planning and writing assignments. They can be reworked and key concepts and ideas can thus be applied to different types of questions and issues.

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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce materia
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Introducción

In this session you are going to learn how to ask about different places of interest in Spain, Chile and Uruguay: what they are, where they are and what they look like.

Key learning points

  • Asking and answering where a monument or a building is

  • Describing a building

  • Using estar to indicate location


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1.5 Léxico básico

aeropuerto (el) airport cultural cultural
antiguo old (a building, a piece of furniture) edificio (el) building
blanco white educativo educational
bonito pretty, nice fe
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1.4.1 About Español de bolsillo

Below is the first example of Español de bolsillo ('Pocket Spanish' phrasebook). These are lists of phrases common in spoken Spanish. They usually consist of expressions best approached as complete phrases even if some of the grammar within them is not yet familiar to you.

Each example of Español de bolsillo has a box in which are written the phrases in Spanish and translated and an audio clip in which you can hear them spoken.

  • Yo
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3 Audio clip 2: John Avery

Figure 2: John Avery (right) with Mr Asghor

John Avery, a single parent of a teenage son and a daughter, lived on a council estate on the outsk
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • understand the principles underlying a rights and participation approach to childhood issues and how these may be applied to a variety of situations within different contexts;

  • develop communication and engagement skills that can be applied to work with children.


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Prosecutor dies of wounds after Istanbul hostage shootout
An Istanbul prosecutor died from his wounds after security forces stormed the office where members of a far-left Turkish group took him hostage. Jillian Kitchener reports. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe More updates and breaking news: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national, and in
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Dividing Team Tasks: Is There a Better Way?
Self-managed teams may sometimes adopt task divisions that are all wrong for the project. Managerial intervention can help avoid this.
Author(s): Phanish Puranam, The Roland Berger Chaired Profess

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Rights not set

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