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3.2 Mobile accessibilty

A few mobile devices have accessibility features and there are some specialist computers designed with a disabled-only accessible interface; for example a portable computer with Braille-only input and output. We will concentrate on the most widely used products: that is software and hardware added to a PC, most often using a Windows platform.


Author(s): The Open University

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2.5 Resources

Barnes, C. (1992) Disabling Imagery and the Media, The British Council of Organisations of Disabled People, Halifax, Ryburn Publishing.


Author(s): The Open University

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1.5.4 References

CSR Europe (undated) ‘Disability: facts and figures’ [online], Brussels, CSR Europe, www.csreurope.org/csrinfo/csrdisability/DisabilityFactsandfigures/ (Accessed 14 August 2007).

National Disability Team (2000–2005) ‘Statistics – On Course’, Chelmsford, National Disability Team, (Accessed 14 August 2007).


Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.1 Ethics

The first factor is ethics. Disabled people should not be excluded from using any product, device or service if it is at all possible to avoid this: disabled people have the same rights as non-disabled people to access goods and services. Teachers generally try to write material that reflects the experiences of women, as well as men and those of people from diverse backgrounds, to make a course inclusive and ‘pedagogically accessible’. This good practice should be extended to include refl
Author(s): The Open University

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2 How active should young people be?

Physical activity in childhood has a range of benefits, including healthy growth and development, maintenance of a healthy weight, mental well-being and learning social skills. It is particularly important for bone health, increasing bone mineral density and preventing osteoporosis in later life. Although there is only indirect evidence (compared with adults) linking physical inactivity in children with childhood health outc
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are to:

  • gain a better idea of the principles of accelerated learning;

  • develop some techniques to use in your classroom;

  • plan how to change your way of teaching to use these techniques.


Author(s): The Open University

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3.4 School Improvement Partners

Following the introduction of School Improvement Partners during 2006–7, governing bodies will no longer be required to take external advice on the head teacher's performance management. Instead, each governing body will be advised by its School Improvement Partner on its management of the head's performance and appraisal. This advice (DfES/Ofsted 2005) will cover the areas currently covered by the External Adviser.


Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

This unit provides access to Teach Global, where you will find a set of courses and resources aimed at supporting teachers who wish to extend their teaching of the global dimension through all aspects of school life.


Author(s): The Open University

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Talking and listening

The emphasis on talking and listening in English Language 5–14 was greeted with genuine surprise in schools, despite policy documents since 1965 advocating the importance of planned contexts for talk and of accepting and developing the language children bring to school. Improved standards in talking and listening, measured by AAP surveys and a selection of HMI school reports, came when teachers corrected the mismatch between their practice and the balance required by the Guidelines.<
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1.4 Flexibility versus conformity: English lanuage 5–14 (Soeid, 1991)

Although 15 per cent of the primary timetable is allocated to the teaching and learning of the English language, as Ellis and Friel (1999, p. 360) note, ‘many schools allocate a proportion of the 20 per cent flexibility factor to English Language’. There are four overall attainment outcomes – listening, talking, reading and writing – while, in each outcome, ‘strands’ outline the specific aspects of learning and assume progression through a series of attainment targets as shown bel
Author(s): The Open University

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5.3 Behaviorism, Piagetianism and social constructivism

How do the well-known ideas of behaviorism, Piagetianism and social constructivism relate to what you actually do as a teacher in a face-to-face context? Are you able to ‘sign up’ to any one of the theories wholeheartedly? As you read the descriptions you may have felt that each of them separately described some aspects of your ideas about learning and those of your colleagues, yet none was wholly satisfactory in its own right. For example, in teaching certain practical skills, a regime o
Author(s): The Open University

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2 Online learning – What does the research tell us?

Marion Coomey and John Stephenson review a range of research to try to set out what designers of online learning should learn from experience.

Activity 2

1 hour 0 minutes

Read the article by
Author(s): The Open University

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1 What is monitoring?

Monitoring means gathering evidence to show what progress has been made towards strategic priorities and targets and the implementation of policies.

Evaluation means making judgements about the results.

DfES 2003, National Training Programme for New Governors, Module 2, p. 4.

Monitoring is a key aspect of governors' remit; it is necessary so that governing bodies can carry out their strat
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3 What does the data tell us?

Data never gives you the answers: it helps you to ask the questions.

(Hawker, 1998)

Realistically, what governors can glean from attainment data, without assistance from the professionals, either in school or through the Local Authority (LA), may be limited, depending on your experience of reading statistical information.

A single set of figures, relating to only one year's results, may n
Author(s): The Open University

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2. What is strategic direction?

Figure 1
Figure 2

In order for governors to be effective and to stand any chance of being involved in the process of raising standards, they
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.1 Science throughout history: a case of attribution?

Much of the science we now take for granted was first done by scientists outside today's industrialised nations. For example, Arabic medicine was in advance of European medicine throughout the Middle Ages, and from Salerno (the first recorded medical school, founded in the 10th century), to Vesalius (the first person to publish a book of human anatomy, in 1543), Western doctors learned from their Muslim counterparts.

Activity 2 gives an opportunity to learn more about some of
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit, you will have:

  • an awareness of methods of introducing film music to secondary school pupils;

  • an understanding of how the concept of music accompanying image can be applied to skills of composition;

  • an awareness of how to develop techniques of appraising and analysing film music through classroom activities.


Author(s): The Open University

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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary and is used under licence.

Author(s): The Open University

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3 Learning styles and museums

It is generally accepted that children and adults learn most effectively in a variety of ways, that we have as human beings a range of differentiated learning styles.

If we had access to resources like this, we could make learning real … Having the freedom to walk a bit more, have a bit more space, spread out into this environment is so conducive to learning. It's very special.

Inspiring Learning for All (2
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Acknowledgements

Author Details

This unit was originally prepared for TeachandLearn.net by Heather Rendall. Heather is a CiLT Associate Trainer and freelance consultant. Her specialisms are ICT, grammar and reading skills. She continues to research into the ‘how’ of learning.

The Modern Foreign Language units have been developed for TeachandLearn.net in collaboration with CiLT.

Other Acknowledgemen
Author(s): The Open University

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