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EPOCH Psychology history timeline
This free course, EPoCH Psychology history timeline, uses an interactive resource (EPoCH) to gain a better sense of how the historical and social context influences psychological inquiry. You will examine the different methods used by psychologists to investigate human behaviour and learn to identify the different perspectives that exist in psychology. Author(s): Creator not set

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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Education, Childhood & Youth qualifications. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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6 Correlation

Activity 5

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity demonstrates how a simple correlation analysis can be carried out. Correlations tell us about the relationship between pairs of variabl
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3.5 Meaning and language-based methods

In recent years many psychologists have become interested in language as an important human ‘product’ (the symbolic data described in Section 2.3 above). There are various ways in which psychologists analyse conversations, data from interviews and written texts. One of the most popular methods is content analysis
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying education. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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4.3.2 Read through to check your answers

When the end of the exam finally approaches, use the last few minutes to check you have numbered all the questions, crossed out rough work that you do not want the examiner to mark, and filled in all the details required on the front sheet.

If you have time before these last few minutes, you may like to reread the answers, tidying up some words, making the meaning a little clearer or rewriting the occasional word that is very hard to read. If you decide to add brief comments, use a numb
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2.3.1 Behaviour

First, for many decades, ‘behaviour’ has provided the most dominant kind of evidence – what people and animals can be seen to do. Behaviour can cover a very wide range of activities. Think about examples such as a rat finding its way through a maze to a pellet of food, a participant in a memory experiment writing down words five minutes after having done a memorising task, a small group of children who are observed whilst they, jointly, use a computer to solve a problem, a teenager admi
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose
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3.14 Key ethical issues for CAM practitioners: negotiation of contracts with users

To benefit users, the user and the practitioner must work towards common goals that have been explicitly discussed. It is especially important for the user to understand the limits of what the therapy can deliver and not be under any delusions about the likely extent of recovery. What should CAM practitioners tell users about the therapy and about themselves? Practitioners cannot assume that users know what their therapy entails. A useful starting point might be to give users an introduction
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2.3.4 Lateralisation

It has long been suspected that unusual patterns of cerebral lateralisation (i.e. the ‘division of labour’ between left and right hemispheres of the brain) may have some connection with dyslexia. Early researchers noticed an apparent excess of left-handedness in children with specific reading difficulties (and their relatives). However, most dyslexic people are in fact right-handed, and most left-handed people are not dyslexic. Nonetheless, large-scale analyses of the research find
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References

Lewis, G. and Phoenix, A. (2004) ‘Race ‘ethnicity’ and identity’ in Questioning Identity, K. Woodward (ed.), London, Routledge/The Open University.
The Runnymede Bulletin (1999) ‘Black deaths in police custody’, no.319, September, pp.8–9.
Sardar, Z., Ravetz, J. and Van Loon, B. (1999) Introducing Mathematics, Cambridge, Icon Books.

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Introduction

You can experience this free course as it was originally designed on OpenLearn, the home of free learning from The Open University: Author(s): The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • recognise some of the skills which are particularly associated with the way social scientists work

  • describe some basic techniques relating to reading, for example, highlighting, note-taking and the processing

  • write in your own words using references and quoting sources.


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5 The pedagogy of open learning

One of the key differences between open learning, where the ‘student’ is remote from the teacher, and a learner just reading a textbook or looking up information for themselves on the internet, is the need to encourage active learning. Whether the material is text, online quizzes or audio-visual elements, the learner should not be a passive absorber of information but actively interacting with the resources. This is grounded in views of how people learn. But I have made some assump
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Assessment in secondary geography
This free course, Assessment in secondary geography, will identify and explore some of the key issues around assessing geography in secondary schools. Through coming to understand these issues and debates, you will reflect on and develop your assessment practice as a geography teacher and develop a greater awareness of the implications of assessment practice on pedagogy and what is considered to be of value in geography education. Author(s): Creator not set

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Exploring equality and equity in education
This free course, Exploring equality and equity in education, considers the complexity of social justice as applied to education and reflects on the different purposes of, and value ascribed to, education in different countries and cultures. It discusses different conceptions of 'justice' and the distinction between equity and equality. First published o
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Working with young people in sport and exercise
This free course, Working with young people in sport and exercise, examines the special considerations of coaching or instructing young people in sport and exercise. The physiological differences between children and adults will be considered along with the practical implications of coaching young people. First published on Tu
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3.11.2 Answering a question in exam conditions

Write out a few exam questions on pieces of card, shuffle them and then pick out a question at random and try to answer it in the time the exam allows. Doing this can give you a sense of the amount you can reasonably write in an exam. You should also get an idea of whether or not you are being too ambitious about what you can cover within the time constraints of an exam. You should be wary of overshooting the timeslot for an exam answer, and not leaving enough time to complete the remaining a
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6.2 Specific difficulties

Some students contend with physical difficulties in reading. Here is one:

And here is another being offered advice by a friend:

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5.1 Critical questions

As well as making sense of what you read, you have to think about whether or not you are convinced by the arguments being presented. At degree level, you don't simply accept what you read – you read ‘critically’, weighing up the strengths and weaknesses of the case the author makes. This means asking another set of questions, such as the ones discussed here.


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