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2.1.2 Dictionaries

One way to tackle the challenge of unfamiliar words is to use a dictionary. You could use a traditional printed dictionary, or an online dictionary, or both. A printed dictionary is easy to keep beside you wherever you happen to be reading. But an online dictionary holds the advantage when it comes looking up words quickly as you can look up a word in three or four online dictionaries simultaneously, to compare the definitions they offer.

You also have a choice between using a genera
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Further reading

de Bono's Thinking Course by Edward de Bono, published by BBC Books, 1999; An interesting general consideration of thinking skills with tools and techniques for developing thinking in a general way.
Use Your Head by Tony Buzan, published by BBC Books, 1995; Lots of useful information on how to make the most of your brainpower.
The Mindmap Book by Tony Buza
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6.1.2 Essay planning

Carefully read the following short essay. Try to identify its strengths and weaknesses in terms of planning. Take your time, but don't think you need to be familiar with the content, you are trying to find what provides the writing's framework.

Then try to answer the questions that follow in Activity 13.

There ar
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8.2 Formulating a question

When you make your own enquiries you draw on your existing knowledge of a discipline or subject area and decide on a specific question to explore; a question that is relevant to some aspect of the subject and which interests you. That means you must have some understanding of what the important questions and issues are in your subject area, and why they are important. In other words, you must have acquired appropriate ‘frameworks for thinking’ within it. That background ensures tha
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1.3 Studying the arts and humanities

Having seen why and how distinctions are made between different arts and humanities subjects, does that mean we cannot think of these subjects ‘as a whole’? The general label ‘arts and humanities’ suggests that there is something that unites them, at the same time distinguishing them from other subject groupings (such as ‘the sciences’ or ‘social sciences’). What unites these subjects is that they focus on:

  • cultural ‘traditions’
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4.6 Line graphs

These are probably the graphs that you will be most used to seeing on an everyday basis. Line graphs are most suitable when you are just comparing one value as it changes with another value. They are less suitable when you want to look at several things at once; for example to study changes in oil prices and supermarket profits on petrol sales, the scales on the left-hand and right-hand sides of a graph would have to be different, and this can be very misleading (there is an example of this i
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4.3 Pie charts, bar charts, histograms and line graphs

These are all different ways of representing data and you are likely to be familiar with some, if not all of them. They usually provide a quick summary that gives you a visual image of the data being presented. Below, we have given a brief definition and some ideas of how each can be used, along with a corresponding activity. We suggest that you look out for similar examples in everyday life, and question the information that you see.


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4.2 Interpreting percentages

Many articles give information in the form of percentages. In such articles, tables and other numerical information are also often presented in terms of percentages. Percentages are used so often because they enable comparisons to be made more easily. Every percentage is expressing a value as a fraction (that is, as a proportion) of a hundred. ‘Percent’ is denoted by % and means ‘out of a hundred’, so 75% means 75 out of 100.

Look at the table in the article in Activity 6. It co
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1.2.7 Summary

  • What we must do to understand numbers as they are used as evidence in social science is to practise and so become familiar with them, and to understand the conventions which determine how they are used.

  • Sets of numerical data can be presented in many ways, as tables, bar charts, pie charts or line graphs. These are just different ways of trying to represent or make a picture of numbers. Which is used is largely a matter of which best shows
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8.2 Writing in your own words

Active reading, or reading and thinking, are bound up with writing in your own words. If you read materials in a passive way, you are much more likely to copy out chunks word for word when you are note taking, and in the process generate very long notes indeed! Similarly, if you do not spend time thinking about what you have read, asking questions and checking your understanding, you will be tempted to copy out difficult bits or simply try to reorder the author's words. In the latter case you
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Investigating psychology
One of the keys to understanding psychology is to know about its history and core questions. This free course, Investigating psychology, allows you to explore psychology using an interactive resource. You can follow links to people, contexts, perspectives and methods to discover information, images and links from across psychology. The resource also links each of these people, contexts, perspectives and methods so you can see how each element is connected in the history of psychology.Author(s): Creator not set

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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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References

DEA/GA (2004) The Global Dimension: Geography, London, Development Education Association.
Goudie, A. (1993) ‘Schools and Universities – the great divide’, Geography 78(4), pp. 338–9.
Gritzner, C. (2004) ‘The Geographic “Mental Map”: Can “anyone” (really) teach geography?’, Journal of Geography 103, pp. 43–5.
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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1.4 Myths and facts

  • Myth – Warming up and being warm are the same thing.

  • Fact – Warming up the body requires physical movement that should gradually increase in speed and intensity over a period of around 15 minutes.

  • Myth – It has to hurt to be doing any good.

  • Fact – Pain can often be a warning sign that the body has gone too far – students should learn to listen to their bodies and interpret t
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying education, childhood & youth qualifications. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner. 


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1.2 Development through dialogue

Activity 2: Reading

1 hour 0 minutes

Now read Chapter 6, ‘Development through dialogue’, of the set book Words and Minds. As you read, pay special attention to:
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Darllen a gwneud nodiadau (Reading and taking notes)
Mae darllen, gwrando a meddwl fel rhan o'ch astudiaeth yn aml yn mynd law yn llaw â gwneud nodiadau o ryw fath. Fe welwch fod sawl ffordd wahanol o ddarllen a sawl ffordd wahanol o wneud nodyn o rywbeth. Yn dibynnu ar eich sefyllfa, efallai y byddwch yn darllen yn fwy neu'n llai am rywbeth, neu efallai y byddwch yn canolbwyntio ar un adran benodol o lyfr. Efallai y byddwch yn gwneud nodiadau helaeth, yn nodi ond rhai geiriau yn unig, yn gwneud diagramau neu efallai na fyddwch yn gwneud nodiada
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