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6.1 Legislative powers of the Scottish Parliament

Section 6 will consider the legislative powers (law making) of the Scottish Parliament, and the procedures that Bills have to go through before they become law. A Bill is a draft Act, and there are a number of different types of Bill. A Public Bill seeks to change the general law or deals with matters of public policy. A Private Bill seeks powers for a particular organisation or individual that are in excess or in conflict with general law. If the Bill is passed it is enacted and becomes an A
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Acknowledgements

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Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should:

  • be able to describe the relationship between social work practice and the law;

  • understand the legal framework that regulates social work in Scotland;

  • have an awareness of the role of law in countering discrimination.


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Acknowledgements

The following material is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

Figur
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3.4 How does the EU operate?

The EU operates through institutions created in the treaties. These institutions can have decision-making powers, law-making powers or may act as part of a checking and consultation procedure.

The institutions include:

  1. The European Parliament (represents the people of the EU).

  2. The Council of the European Union (represents the member states of the EU).

  3. The European Commission (represents the interests of the EU).
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6.3 The golden rule

This rule is a modification of the literal rule. It states that if the literal rule produces an absurdity, then the court should look for another meaning of the words to avoid that absurd result. The rule was closely defined by Lord Wensleydale in Grey v Pearson (1857) HL Cas 61, who stated:

The grammatical and ordinary sense of the words is to be adhered to unless that would lead to some absurdity or some r
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3.4 Did I make a rough estimate to act as a check?

When using a calculator many people have ‘blind faith’ in its capacity to provide the correct result.

Calculators invariably provide the co
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1.3.1: The mean and the median

This subsection looks at two ways of finding an ‘average’. The first produces the mean, which is what was originally meant by ‘average’, and what most people think of when they talk about an average. The second gives the median, which might more accurately be described as a ‘typical’ or middle value. They will be illustrated using the following batch of heights.

The heights in metres (measured to the nearest centimetre) of a group of seven people are as follows
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6.5 Solutions to ‘making a lawn’

Learning from the marking of the previous questions, write out a good solution to the following problem.

Example 18: Making a lawn

Suppose you have some friends who are planning to put a new lawn in their garden. The lawn is to be 12 m by 14 m and they have a choice of either laying turf or sow
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3.1.1 Try some yourself

1 Write the folowing as word formulas and then shorten them

  • (a) The area of a square is its length squared.

  • (b) The area of a rectangle is its length times its breadth.


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Introduction

An integral part of learning mathematics involves communication.

Writing mathematics is a specific skill which needs to be developed and practised: there is a lot of difference between putting down a few symbols for your own use and writing a mathematical solution intended for someone else to read. In attempting mathematical questions, you may previously have written down very little, just enough, perhaps, to convince yourself that you could answer the questions. This may suffice now, b
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1.6.3 Don’t jump to conclusions

Time-series graphs are popular with newspapers for suggesting and comparing trends. But showing how a single quantity varies with time is not the same as showing how two quantities vary, and then suggesting a link between them.

Figure 34
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6 Subtracting when you have to borrow

If the digit at the top of any column in your subtraction is smaller than the digit at the bottom of the same column, you need to borrow (or carry) from the next column on the left.

There is an example of this below. Click on each step in turn to see how to carry out the calculation.

Active content not displayed. This content
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5 Practice dividing in your head

Before you go any further, you might want to practise doing some divisions in your head using basic multiplications of numbers up to 10. For example if you know:

  • 8 multiplied by 6 is 48

then you also know:

  • 48 divided by 6 is 8

To practise, go to one of the following websites:

  1. The Practice sums page of the Numbers website. Select Division from the
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1.2.5 Bar charts: Surgical removal of tattoos

Figure 4 shows a bar chart for the data in Table 7 on the effectiveness
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1.1.1 Introduction

The data sets you will meet in this section are very different from each other, both in structure and character. By the time you reach the end of the unit, you will have carried out a preliminary investigation of each, identified important questions about them and made a good deal of progress with some of the answers. As you work through the course developing statistical expertise, several of these data sets will be revisited and different questions addressed.

There are seven data sets
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6.2 Inverse proportion

The second type of proportional relationship is known as inverse proportion.

Suppose you have decided to hire a taxi to take a group of colleagues from work to the railway station. If the taxi firm charges a set fee for the journey, then the more people who go in the taxi, the less each person has to pay: if two people go, each pays half the cost; if three people go, each pays a third of the cost and if four people go, each person pays a quarter of the cost. This is an exa
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3.4 Maths in business

One of the advantages of identifying the general features of a calculation and then describing it mathematically is that the formula can then be used in either a computer or a calculator program to work out many different calculations quickly and efficiently. Many utility suppliers (gas, water, electricity, telephone) have tariffs based on a fixed daily (or monthly or quarterly) charge and a further charge based on how much you have used during the billing period.

For example in 2005, a
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1 Exploring patterns and processes

Suppose you are tiling a bathroom or kitchen and the last row of square tiles is to be a frieze made up of blank tiles and patterned tiles as shown below.

Figure 1
F
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Introduction

This unit is an adapted extract from the course Pure mathematics (M208)

The idea of vectors and conics may be new to you. In this unit we look at some of the ways that we represent points, lines and planes in mathematics.

In Section 1 we revise coordinate geometry in two-dimensional Euclidean space, Author(s): The Open University

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