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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying sociology. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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2.4 Northern Ireland

Ireland was long considered a de facto province of England, a colonial possession dominated politically and militarily by its more powerful neighbour to the east. The English divided Ireland into counties for administrative purposes, introduced English law and established a Parliament in England and Ireland in 1297, within which only the Anglo-Irish were represented. By the fourteenth century Irish discrimination by the English had prompted widespread protests, which had resulted in a revival
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2.1 England

England played a dominant role in the medieval history of Britain, and the history of the UK is undoubtedly the history of the political and cultural power of England in comparison to Scotland, Wales and Ireland. In the making of the UK, each component nation played a different role: the English and Scottish kingdoms, the incorporation of Wales into the English Crown, and the subjugation of Ireland. The making of the UK was complex and fraught with violent confrontations, particularly virulen
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the process of political devolution in the UK

  • relate this process to both historical developments and to the wider context of contemporary events in Europe

  • practise the skill of reading, summarising and evaluating academic arguments

  • engage more actively as a citizen in relevant political debates (especially if you are a citizen of Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland!).

    <
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Introduction

This course should take you about 8 hours to study if you attempt the recommended exercises and make summary notes of its key points. Doing so will allow you to practise the crucial academic skill of summary and précis – extracting the gist of an argument – which will be of particular help if you go on to study in related areas: perhaps the related politics courses on the OpenLearn website or in the Open University courses from which they come.

This OpenLearn course provides a samp
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Acknowledgements

This chapter adapted for OpenLearn is from ‘Microeconomics by Susan Himmelweit, Roberto Simonetti and Andrew Trigg, published by Thomson Learning in association with The Open University, 2001 and ‘Markets’ one of the three core books from the D319 course Understanding Economic Behaviour: Households, Firms and Markets.

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources f
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References

Baxter, C, Poonia, K., Ward, L. and Nadirshaw, Z. (1990). Double Discrimination: Issues and Services for People with Learning Difficulties from Black and Ethnic Minority Communities, London, Kings Fund Centre.
Becker, G. (1971). The Economics of Discrimination. Series: (ERS) Economic Research Studies.
Blackaby, D., Clark, K., Leslie, D. and Murphy, P. (1994). Bla
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
Author(s): The Open University

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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying sociology. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


Author(s): The Open University

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9 Activities

Activity 1 Life cycle earnings

The New Earnings Survey publish various labour market statistics including the following information.


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8 Conclusion

In this course we have examined a number of explanations for why labour market disadvantage, such as low pay, unemployment, and so on, falls disproportionately on certain groups within the labour market. We have shown that these explanations basically fall into two broad schools of thought, the orthodox or neoclassical approach and institutional models of labour market segmentation. The former attempts to explain the distribution of disadvantage in terms of human capital theory and utility ma
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7 Policy issues

There are several issues we need to address concerning anti-discrimination policy. The first involves the different policy prescriptions that can be derived from the theories we have considered. The various theoretical approaches provide different explanations for why discrimination occurs and it follows that these will produce different types of policies to deal with discrimination. Second, the empirical work that has been carried out to explain gender and racial earnings differences also pr
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6.4 Empirical analysis

Three key hypotheses have been the focus of empirical evaluation of the segmented labour market theory. First, that the labour market can be represented as comprising at least two well-defined and self-contained segments. Second, that the labour market behaviour of workers and firms in each segment requires a different set of behavioural hypotheses. Finally, that there is limited mobility between the segments reflecting institutional and social barriers in the labour market rather than a lack
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6.3 The roots of segmentation

Why does segmentation occur? One approach to this question focuses upon the evolution of the product markets, from the competitive and the localised to the producer dominated, and from the national to an international market. Technological change makes capital-intensive methods of production possible. Employers, however, are unwilling to undertake large-scale investment unless the product demand is stable and predictable; when demand is variable, labour-intensive techniques are preferred. A g
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The Final Cut
It is often said that a movie comes to life in the edit suite. Ben Harrex of Final Cut post production studios in London discusses five themes with examples; The Cut, The Dissolve, Cropping and Resizing, Titles and The Sound. Ben explains how the video editor has a huge amount of creative control over how the final product looks. This material forms part of The Open University course T215 Communication and information technologies.Author(s): The OpenLearn team

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Computer technology: robotic milking and interactive mirrors
What have computers got to do with cows? Can a wooden mirror help us understand the computing behind digital image capture? Neil Rowse is the first dairy farmer in the UK to use a computerised system that gives cows control over when they are milked, and allows him to remotely monitor the welfare of individual animals. Daniel Rozin has created an computer operated mirror made from 835 tilting wooden tiles. With the help of a digital camera and a computer programme, the wooden tiles mimic the di
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Keeping Ahead in ICT
The legacy of apartheid in South Africa left people in urban townships and rural areas without access to basic communication technology that defines the digital age. Today, the latest mobile phone technology has changed everything. To reach the poorest communities, the government has had to adapt the technology and build new commercial partnerships. The six video tracks in this album introduce the size of the challenge, government policy and initiatives and the businesses that benefit. This mat
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Visualisation: Visual representations of data and information
Modern society is often referred to as 'the information society' - but how can we make sense of all the information we are bombarded with? In this free course, Visualisation: Visual representations of data and information, you will learn how to interpret, and in some cases create, visual representations of data and information that help us to see things in a different way. Author(s): Creator not set

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Introduction

Enterprise systems are software applications that automate and integrate all many of the key business processes of an organisation. With some understanding of software development, you will learn about current development practices for this type of system and develop relevant skills to apply them to real-world problems. You will develop core skills in object-oriented analysis and design, allowing you to develop software that is fit for purpose, reusable and amenable to change.

This Open
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