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Cànan nan Gàidheal
’S e dùthaich ioma-chànanach a tha ann an Alba an-diugh. Tha a’ Ghàidhlig, Albais agus Beurla, còmhla ri cànain Eòrpach agus eile a tha nise san dùthaich, uile a’ toirt buaidh air mar a tha sluagh Alba a’ bruidhinn ri chèile agus ris a’ chòrr dhen t-saoghal. Chaidh an t-aonad seo - a tha ri fhaotainn an Gàidhlig agus am Beurla - a chruthachadh le misneachadh bho Bhòrd na Gàidhlig agus le taic bhon a’ BhBC. Tha e na ghoireas do dhuine sam bith aig a bheil ùidh phearsanta
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Languages at Work
All of us in our working lives increasingly need to work with people from other cultures or those whose native language is foreign, or we may have to go to another country and work as a foreigner ourselves. This free course, Languages at work, is about how to understand differences in culture and how to make the most of existing language skills. It is aimed at all adult learners, whether in FE or in the workplace. The sections are independent, and can be studied in any order and any combination.
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Datblygu strategaethau astudio effeithiol (Develop effective study strategies)
Gall dod i wybod sut rydych yn dysgu eich helpu i ddatblygu technegau astudio sy'n gweddu i'ch anghenion a'r dasg dan sylw. Bydd gwella eich strategaethau astudio yn arbed amser i chi, yn ysgafnhau eich baich gwaith ac yn helpu i wella ansawdd eich gwaith. Yn yr uned hon byddwch yn dysgu technegau ac yn datblygu sgiliau a fydd yn eich helpu gyda'ch astudiaethau.Author(s): Creator not set

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Introduction

When a company moves to a new site it is known as ‘relocation’. This is a big decision, involving everyone connected with the company – staff, customers, suppliers and shareholders. It also affects the families, friends and communities of the people involved with the company. This unit uses case studies of different companies to show the steps involved in relocation.

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2.2 The history of grammatical description

Of these approaches, prescriptive grammars are probably the best known. Originally associated with describing ancient Greek, a system of labelling parts of speech developed into a way of laying down rules on the socially correct usage of language. Because of their origin in the ancient languages, prescriptive grammars introduced rules into English which arguably imposed labels and expectations that had not evolved from within the living language.

Descriptive grammars in the USA and Euro
Author(s): The Open University

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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you t
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand why companies may decide to move

  • identify factors they have to consider

  • demonstrate knowledge of what they may look for in the new location.


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Introducing Health Sciences: Paramedics
Traumatic injury causes millions of deaths and disabilities globally and cases are rising as road traffic increases. This album features a real-life simulation of the aftermath of a car crash and reveals the crucial steps paramedics must take to tend to the injured driver and get him into the ambulance. It shows the importance of the Platinum Ten Minutes and the Golden Hour, key concepts which the ambulance services follow when dealing with life-threatening conditions. This material forms part o
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Introduction

The stresses of modern living take their toll in terms of our health. This unit is formed from three extracts. The first extract is called ‘Understanding why people use complementary and alternative medicine'. This part discusses: the meaning of health, its origins in terms of components and beliefs. Also models of health care delivery are discussed together with concepts and beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine. Extract two 'Critical issues in the therapeutic relationship'
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Managing to meet service users' needs
Frontline managers are responsible for gathering service user views on their needs. Whose views should be taken into account? How do managers gather views? This free course, Managing to meet service users' needs, helps you consider ways of getting feedback from service users, and shows the inclusive approach of a manager of a voluntary sector mental health service. Author(s): Creator not set

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Introducing public health
This free course, Introducing public health, presents some key elements of public health and health promotion. It considers the scope and focus of public health and how it is subject to change and located within the wider global context. First published on Fri, 01 Jun 2018 as Author(s): Creator not set

5.1 What is disability?

The focus in this section is on how disability can impact on communication and relationships in the context of health and social care. The section is structured around four main activities: there are three readings for which you should set aside at least one-and-a-half hours. Activity 26 asks you to consi
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4.12 The implications of gender differences in communication

Activity 20

0 hours 20 minutes

If it were true that men and women tend to communicate in very different ways, what might be the implications for health and social
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4.8 Gender and difference

The discussion above referred to some of the stereotypes about the ways in which men and women supposedly communicate and interact with each other. For example, there is a view that in meetings men tend to talk in a supposedly rational way, while women's talk is associated more with feelings and emotions. It was also suggested that male workers are more likely to be intimidating or overwhelming in their relationships with service users and, by implication, that female workers might be less in
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3.14 Challenging racism

Section 2.3 explored strategies for ‘working with difference’ in care services, based on an approach that acknowledges diversity in communication needs. You saw that there are dangers in strategies that adopt too rigid a notion of ethnicity, such as the danger of homogenising diverse groups of people. There is also a danger that such strategies might result in a reinforcement of discriminatory practice.

Although the approach to inter-ethnic or cross-cultural communication described
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2.7.5 Identities are negotiated

In constructing their identities, people can only draw on terms that are available in society at that time, which have meanings and associations attached. However, people may attribute different meanings and importance to those labels. This means people always negotiate their identities, in the context of the different meanings attached to them.

Taking this view of identity, as a social process that people engage in, rather than as a fixed essence inside them, is not to deny that partic
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1.3 People involved in parenting

Another interesting question remains: can only a parent or parents provide these necessities? (We are leaving on one side for the moment the issue of which parent.) Clearly the answer has to be no. There are many examples of people involved in parenting who are not a child's parents. For example:

  • step-parents

  • grandparents

  • aunts and uncles

  • brothers and sisters

  • friends


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1.1 Introduction

Historically, one of the most significant changes over the past hundred years has been the move away from large families living and remaining in one community to smaller family units that are required, through the economic necessity of employment opportunities, to be as mobile as possible. Extended family networks are often weaker: in many instances parents are unable to call on the support of children's grandparents, aunts and uncles, and for some people parenting can be a very isolating and
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3.2 Qualified nurses: working in the shadow of medicine?

Dave, the senior registrar at Leeds General, made a strong statement about nurses on the audio clip:

Nursing staff are vital. I can't be there all the time. They are my eyes and ears. So they basically watch over the patients for me and will let me know of any changes either good or bad that may be important. If you are performing a procedure … it's very helpful to have an assistant there, someone who can help yo
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