Introduction

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Crime, order and social control (D315) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this subject area.


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ArtYard, a new contemporary art center in Frenchtown​t
ArtYard began in Frenchtown, NJ with a “hatch.” From a huge egg, people emerged in chicken costumes to the music of a jazz saxophonist, leading a parade from ArtYard’s future headquarters in an old egg hatchery to its current space at 62A Trenton Road. It’s the kind of unexpected, collaborative event that ArtYard has become known for, and that you can expect more of in the future. Producer Susan Wallner visited ArtYard Founder and Executive Director Jill Kearney at the new, expansive cen
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Start writing fiction
This album provides the budding author with everything they need to know about approaching the art of fiction writing. Each track contains discussions and interviews with best-selling novelists from a variety of backgrounds including Alex Garland, Louis de Bernières, Abdulrazak Gurnah and Monique Roffey. This enlightening and engaging series tackles the practicalities and pitfalls of writing fiction. It contains invaluable advice on the creation of characters, the structure of narratives and ho
Author(s): The iTunes U team

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Introduction

This unit will help you understand how arguments are constructed and used in the Social Sciences. The material is primarily an audio file, originally 30 minutes in length and recorded in 1998.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Social policy: Welfare power and diversity (D218) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • understand how arguments may be presented in the Social Sciences.


Author(s): The Open University

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2.3 The building of Thugga

So far we have been considering aspects of Thugga without taking into account the chronology of the site and its monuments. The following table lists the public buildings and monuments of Thugga which are securely dated by inscriptions and gives the date (as near as possible) of construction along with an assessment of how African or Roman they are.


Author(s): The Open University

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1 3. From experience to interpretation

In almost all films, the visual story is completed first, dialogue and sound effects are then added and music is composed last of all. However, when Disney made the animated film Fantasia in 1940, they reversed the process, producing animations based on pieces of classical music. You may like to look at the Disney archives website, or read some information about the making of Fantasia from the Disney family museum website.

At the time, this was thought of as a way to popularise c
Author(s): The Open University

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4.11 Critiquing gender essentialism

Activity 19

0 hours 30 minutes

Look again at what Tannen and Gray say about men's and women's communicative behaviour. Then review the description of essentialism and the social con
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4.2.2 The significance of the average energy

The average thermal energy of the atoms in a solid indicates how much they are 'rattling' or vibrating around their mean positions. Since the atoms are close together, virtually touching, and because atoms are almost incompressible, they cannot get much closer. But they can get further apart. So, since thermal energy is manifested in the vibrations of the atoms, bigger vibrations mean that the atoms must spend more time further apart. On average then, there is a tendency for a solid to expand
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Duke Medicine Profiles: Antonio F. Williams, PA-C
Get to know Duke Medicine's orthopaedics providers.
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Reproduction literacy and academic integrity
Reproduction literacy and academic integrity - UNSPECIFIED Keywords:UNSPECIFIED
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European Economic Policy (2016)
This course encourages students to reflect on the economic theory which gives rise to a range of possible economic policy options for European Union countries. It studies the implementation of economic policies and their consequences from an international perspective. From 2015/2016, this course is a Jean Monnet Module and will introduce innovative teaching methods. Students will participate in the EUCitizensLab and analyse for themselves the effects of policy on EU citizens. They will convert t
Author(s): Judith Clifton,Marcos Fernández Gutiérrez

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Rights not set

Crown Forum: April 16, 2015
Scholar's Day: A Celebration of Excellence
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bad terms for LD
bad terms for LD - John Savage Keywords:UNSPECIFIED
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Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations (Spanish Subtitles)
This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete
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3.1 (2A): Exploring the global implications of different mindsets

In this activity the aim is to investigate the implications of different mindsets with regards to the future unfolding of events on a global scale.

Activity

So far, you have focused your attention on exploring your p
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The Thought Train Ep. 5 - Professor Anna Bull
On the University of Bath Thought Train we sit down with an academic from the University to talk about their work and current events. On this week's show Professor Anna Bull is in the studio to talk about modern Italy and the issues it faces. She also discusses: - The Italian's attitude towards austerity - Italy's thoughts on Brexit - The various political parties vying for power in the 2018 elections
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1.1 1 Why include a global dimension in science education?

Western science drew on a world heritage, on the basis of sharing ideas.

Sen (2002)

The global dimension refers to approaches to education … which focus on global issues, events and interdependence. … pupils will develop … an understanding of different cultural and political perspectives, as well as knowledge of
Author(s): The Open University

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4.1.1 Space problems

Probably the best known of these is the fact that the internet is running out of space for identifying computers. Each computer in a network needs to be identified by a unique data pattern known as an IP address. The current technology used to transport data around the internet is such that in the comparatively near future we shall run out of space to hold these unique addresses. Happily this is a problem that has been identified and groups of researchers around the globe have developed new t
Author(s): The Open University

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