5.9 Plagiarism

Referencing is not only useful as a way of sharing information, but also as a means of ensuring that due credit is given to other people's work. In the electronic information age, it is easy to copy and paste from journal articles and web pages into your own work. But if you do use someone else's work, you should acknowledge the source by giving a correct reference.

Taking someone's work and not indicating where you took it from is termed plagiarism and is regarded as an infringement of
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1.4.1 Discourse involves work

If discourse is doing something rather than doing nothing, what kinds of things are being done? We can see that Diana's account in Extract 1, like all accounts, constructs a version of social reality. When we talk we have open to us multiple possibilities for characterizing ourselves and events. Indeed, there are many ways Diana could have answered Bashir's first question in the extract above. Any one description competes with a range of alternatives and indeed some of these alternativ
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Hatfield House AA59_03695

*

Hatfield House, Hertfordshire. A view from the grounds of the east elevation. Photographed by Herbert Felton in 1959.
© Historic England


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1.5.1 The co-production of meaning

The third sense in which discourse is a social action refers to the origins of meanings. Meaning emerges from complex social and historical processes. It is conventional and normative. We have some idea what it signifies to say Prince Charles is a proud man because we are members of a speaking community and culture which has agreed associations for ‘proud man’. We draw on those to make sense. Meaning is also relational. Proud signifies as it does because of the existence of other t
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3.4 Showing a good grasp of ideas

To show your grasp of the ideas you have been studying you have to express them for yourself, in your own words. Your tutor will certainly be looking out for signs that you understand the centrally important issues. For example, Philip showed that he understood the significance of Ellis's point about women's loss of a household management role. But he was very vague about the effects this had on women's lives in the countryside, which suggests he hadn't really sorted out that part of h
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2.3 Intermediaries

The emperor could not be in all places at once, and he employed subordinates and representatives in the provinces to act on his behalf.

Exercise 2

You should now read Goodman, pages 100–4 and 107–10, below. T
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2.8.1 Learning about verbs

You and Christine go to a shop to buy a film for your visit to the museum.

Key Learning Points

  • Talking about time

  • Asking for goods and services

  • Learning about verbs

  • Using verb forms:
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3.2 Urban unrest: the case of the French urban periphery

‘France had a rebellion of its underclass’, argued American social scientist Immanuel Wallerstein (2005). He was referring to the ‘unrest’ or ‘riots’ which began on Thursday 28 October 2005 in Clichy-sous-Bois, a large public housing estate, or banlieue, on the outskirts of Paris, and then spread to a number of other areas across urban France. The riots were sparked by the accidental deaths of two young boys fleeing the police. The boys were subsequently referred to by the
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand how the world is in the process of ‘being made’, right down to the earth beneath our feet

  • consider how islands are shaped by a dynamic relationship between territories and flows

  • show how human life is entangled with non-human forces and processes in the making of today's globalised world.


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You'd have to be one tough and hungry animal to try to make a meal out of a venomous western diamondback rattlesnake.  After all, this North American desert dweller is one of the most dangerous snakes in the world. This video uses professional video footage and narration from National Geographic to show the battle between two predators, the rattler and a hawk. The issue of which animal is the superior predator is quickly established. An excellent video while teaching a lesson about predators.
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This 1:24 minute video is a quick overview of the history of this city and some of its culture.
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4.3 R is for Relevance

Relevance is an important factor to consider when you are evaluating information. It isn't so much a property of the information itself but of the relationship it has with your question or your 'information need'. For example, if you are writing an essay about the portrayal of jealousy in the nineteenth century European novel a book or website about Shakespeare's Othello would not be relevant. So there are a number of ways in which a piece of information may not be relevant to your query:


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This free course, Financial accounting and reporting, discusses how accountants act as processors and purveyors of information for decision making and the needs of those who use accounting information. It also looks at the role performed by accountants and notes the need to be aware of relevant regulatory and conceptual frameworks. First published on Thu, 11 Feb 2016
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COPMM/PMAA Symposium - Derek Gill - Improving the Performance of Local Government Authorities
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The Beaver Stadium gets a Lion-head adornment
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What are cyborgs? Would a cyborg future deliver positive human advances or a Hollywood-style nightmare in which human beings have become a sub-species? Could we one day download our minds? This album gives an insight into the development of cybernetics and how it is used to fuse technology and humanity. The interfaces that communicate between man and machine are developing rapidly and to Prof. Kevin Warwick at Reading University, cyborgs are a technological evolutionary step forward from humans.
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Social/Emotional Assessment-Manning
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1.13 Conclusion

So far we have traversed three kinds of domain in which the study of discourse is relevant. Discourse is often (but not necessarily) interactional and researchers have studied the order and pattern in social interaction. The study of discourse also has important psychological implications for the study of minds, selves and sense-making. Finally, discourse is about social relations, culture, government and politics.

No doubt, as you have been reading some problematic and confusing areas
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