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7.1 Hierarchies of ideas

A useful way of giving sense and structure to ideas can sometimes be to see them in the form of a hierarchy. At one end is the ‘big picture’ (e.g. general context, principles, theories, ideas, concepts) and at the other end are particular facts, examples and other details. For example, the concept of living things contains the category of animals and plants. Animals contains the category of mammals, which contains the category of dogs, which contains the specific type of dog called Dalmat
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7.3 Drafting essays

As you may remember from Activity 4, the main elements of an essay are:

  • the introduction

  • the main body

  • the conclusion.


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5.2.2 Opening up ideas: analysing the question

What do you need to know about your assignment? Most importantly, what it's about (i.e. the topic). Once you have worked this out, you are in a better position to gauge how much you already know and how much you will need to find out.

Activity 9


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Content

If we look specifically at OpenLearn free courses, the content comprises both the course (structured self-study resources) as well as the individual assets that make up a course.

The assets of a course are the materials such as text, images, animations, audio clips, etc., which are likely to be in different digital formats. In some cases a course will consist of just one asset, but most contain a variety.

As the number of OpenLearn free courses grows, so does the variety available
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Keep on learning

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3.3 From integration to inclusion

‘Inclusive education’, then, goes beyond ‘integration’ – a term which, until the late 1990s, was generally used to describe the process of repositioning a child or groups of children in mainstream schools. ‘Integration’ was a term used by organisations such as CSIE (originally called the Centre for Studies in Integration in Education) when seeking neighbourhood placements for all students, and implied the need for a student to adapt to the school, rather than for the scho
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand spoken descriptions of holiday resorts

  • understand people talking about where and when they take their holidays and why

  • write an informal postcard or letter identifying the advantages and disadvantages of a holiday resort and/or describing personal holiday plans

  • make a short oral presentation about personal holiday plans

  • question other people about their plans
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Introduction

This course takes you on a journey of discovery where you are invited to challenge ideas, both new and old, in relation to mental health. It is made up of a series of three extracts. The first extract, ‘Boundaries of explanation’, sets out the theme of boundaries: boundaries within and between groups; within and between explanatory frameworks; and within and between experiences of mental health and distress. The second extract, ‘Whose risk is it anyway?’, considers a critical account
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce materia
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4.11 Critiquing gender essentialism

Activity 19

0 hours 30 minutes

Look again at what Tannen and Gray say about men's and women's communicative behaviour. Then review the description of essentialism
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2.7.4 Identities are contextual and interactional

Different identities assume greater or less importance, and play different roles, in different contexts and settings, and in interactions with different people. Different aspects of people’s identity may come to the fore in the workplace and in the home, for example, while people might emphasise different aspects of themselves to different people (and different people may see different identities when they meet them).


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Planning an evaluation

The evaluation should have clear aims and objectives. It is also helpful to decide where its boundaries should lie – how much or how little is to be evaluated?

Activity 4

0 hours 20 minutes

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6.5 Training at high altitude

Many of the world's best endurance athletes train at high altitudes – a long way above sea level – to improve their performance. At high altitudes there is less oxygen in the air and it's believed that the body has to work harder to extract what little oxygen remains. When the athlete returns to lower altitudes, their body retains the ability to use oxygen more efficiently and their performance will have improved.

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand how some of the needs of homeless people can be met.


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1.2 Health and the media

There is certainly no shortage of coverage of health topics in the media. Every night television has at least one, and frequently two or three programmes about aspects of health. There are specific programmes about health such as Health Watch, and there are other programmes with a health aspect such as environmental pollution, as well as programmes on the politics of health services such as hospital waiting lists. There is also no shortage of warnings about health. Health can be seen a
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3.4 Type

To improve aerobic fitness the ACSM recommends exercise that employs large muscle groups, is rhythmic or dynamic, can be maintained continuously and is aerobic in nature (Garber et al., 2011). This type of exercise results in larger increases in aerobic fitness. Activities that would fit into this category include walking, running, swimming and cycling. This again depends upon the level of the individual and their goals and demands of their activity or sport.

Frequency, intensity, time
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2.9 The failure of CAM therapeutic relationships: creating dependency to satisfy practitioners' emot

Although a failed therapeutic relationship is often assumed to involve a patient not returning, the case of a patient who attends repeatedly can also be highly problematic. This phenomenon can be seen as a breach of boundaries in that an inappropriately extended therapeutic relationship changes from being a healing encounter into a dependency relationship or friendship. Unlike the timescale contracts that may be negotiated in counselling and psychotherapy, there are no fixed timescales for mo
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