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3.1 Modelling properties

This section provides a model for properties interpreted in terms of the average thermal energy of all the constituent atoms of a material. Since absolute temperature T is a measure of average atomic kinetic energy, we shall expect to be looking at properties that change gradually with T, roughly proportionally, over a wide range. In terms of the classification introduced in Author(s): The Open University

2.1 Boiling water

Whether it's to wash clothes, make a cup of tea, or just make it safe to drink, water often has to be heated – sometimes to boiling point. There are many ways to do this, but a very common means is some form of electric water-boiler, such as a kettle or an urn. In all but the crudest ones, a device is fitted to ensure that heating does not continue once the boiling point of water is reached.

In deciding on the type and design of such a device, we can suppose that a company manufacturi
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4.6 Conclusion to Section 4

This brief account has introduced a few of the most rapidly developing areas of optical-fibre communications as of January 2004. By the time you are reading it things will certainly have moved on, and if you want to find the current state of the art you should read journals such as IEEE Communications Magazine or trade magazines such as Lightwave. It is also possible to find out more on the world wide web.

I hope you will agree that this is a fascinating field, and that yo
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3.5.3 Protozoa

Protozoa are microscopic single cell animals. They utilise solid substances and bacteria as a food source. They can only function aerobically, and in a stream which contains little organic degradable matter they can become a predominant microbial type. They play an important part in sewage treatment where they remove free-swimming bacteria and help to produce a clear effluent.

In an aquatic environment, there are three main types of protozoa:

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3.4 Conclusion

The headings alongside each of the activities in this article were there to remind you of the three different types of learning to which you were introduced in Section 2: memorising, understanding and doing. The three models of the learning process that were discussed in the reading – acquisitive, constructivist and experiential – have strengths particularly for each of these three kinds of learning.

Some learning goals require that we know information accurately and can recall it w
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Myth at the heart of the Roman Empire
How and why did ancient Romans use myth to validate their power? Emperor Augustus legitimised his rule by entwining his own ancestry with the mythical stories of Rome's foundation, and created a divine aura around Rome as capital of the vast empire. This album visits key emblems associated with Rome's beginnings: the Forum and the Capitoline Hill with its statue of the she-wolf and Romulus and Remus; the Emperor Augustus's palace and ceremonial altar, and the 17th Century D'Arpino frescos of fou
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Introduction

Inspired by the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century, the intellectuals of eighteenth-century Europe launched a dazzling programme for the extension of knowledge and for the promotion of human welfare. Their programme has become known as the ‘Enlightenment’ and their age is often called the ‘Age of Enlightenment’.

This course is concerned with science in Scotland, one of the most dynamic centres of Enlightenment thinking. Writers speak of the mid-eighteenth century a
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1.1.1 The Rhind papyrus

For a literate civilisation extending over some 4000 years, that of the ancient Egyptians has left disappointingly little evidence of its mathematical attainments. Even though the classical Greeks believed mathematics to have been invented in Egypt – though their accounts are far from unanimous on how this happened – there are now but a handful of papyri and other objects to convey a sense of Egyptian mathematical activity. The largest and best preserved of these is the Rhind papyrus (Ext
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand that 'texts' are not restricted to the written word

  • understand war memorials as text

  • interpret a visual text at a basic level.


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Further reading

For a more advanced introduction to the topic of consciousness, which includes an historical survey of philosophical and psychological work on the topic and a survey of recent debates, see:
Güzeldere, G. (1997) ‘The many faces of consciousness: a field guide’, in N. Block, O. Flanagan and G. Güzeldere (eds), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, pp. 1–67. (The
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5.1 Early career

James Hutton (1726–97) conforms fairly closely to Emerson's identikit picture of an intellectual of the Scottish Enlightenment. His chief scientific work was his Theory of the Earth, which was launched at meetings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1785 and eventually expanded and published in two large volumes, ten years later, in 1795.

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5.6.3 Honeymoons

Image 65 Photographer/Painter: Alfred Pettit, Keswick. Subject: Ben Naylor and his new wife C
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2.1.1 Card mounted photographs 1860–c.1914

Figure 3
Image 3 Phot
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2.1 Styles of photograph

Let's briefly examine the various styles of photograph that are commonly found in family albums.

Figure 1

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2.2.3 Model 3: African + Roman = African persistence and no evidence of Roman traits dominating (sep

This scenario sees African culture surviving following the Roman conquest, and where Roman culture is visible it does not replace preexisting practice. Here we might imagine a laissez-faire attitude on the part of the Roman state, allowing the conquered people to carry on in their previous ways and the African people not needing to, or wanting to, adopt Roman customs, practices, forms of representation and cultural identity. In this model we might expect to find Roman and African trait
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • practise identification of ‘indigenous’ identity and culture

  • practise identification of ‘Roman’ identity and culture

  • study the development of Romano-African culture.


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Introduction

This OpenLearn course examines the nature of social marketing and how the adoption of marketing concepts, frameworks and techniques developed for commercial marketers can be applied to the solution of social problems. Primarily, social marketing aims to effect behavioural change in the pursuit of social goals and objectives, as opposed to financial or other objectives.

This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course
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The market-led organisation
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this free course, The market-led organisation, will improve your understanding of market orientation and of the process of going to market. It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships. Author(s): Creator not set

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An introduction to public leadership
In this free course, An introduction to public leadership, you will learn more about leadership in the context of public service provision, by public sector organisations, community and voluntary groups, and political bodies. First published on Thu, 01 Nov 2018 as Author(s): Creator not set

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