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2.2 What is constructive social work?

Activity 3

1 hour 20 minutes

Read the following article: ‘What do we mean by “Constructive social work”?’

While you're reading, make notes on the theoretical and philosophica
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1.2 Hearing about critical practice

Activity 2

1 hour 0 minutes

Listen to the following audio clips, ‘Panel discussion on critical practice’, Part 1: Critical practice.


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4 Comment on the audio clips

In the audio clips, Angela Yih defined fuel poverty as any household which had to spend more than ten per cent of its income on energy, (believed to apply to 700,000 people in Scotland). This is, of course, a rather vague definition, one that conveys nothing about the effectiveness, or otherwise, of what is spent on keeping warm. As you heard, many people spent as much as 20 per cent or more of their income on fuel, and were still unable to heat their homes adequately in winter. However, this
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2.1.3 Angela Yih

Figure 2
Angela Yih

Angela Yih was working for Age Concern Scotland, based in Edinburgh. She had been heavily involved in a campaign, with other vol
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5 Audio clip 2: Danny

Danny is 49 and sleeps rough in the city, as he has done for very many years. He was born and bred in Northern Ireland, and recounted some happy childhood memories. He became a civil servant in London, working for the Department of Health and Social Security, as a higher executive officer, but lost his job and his wife through drink. After sleeping rough on the streets of London for a while, he returned to Belfast. After robbing a chemist's shop, he was sent to prison for seven years, for rob
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6.2 Concepts of Illness

Sontag (1979) wrote about the metaphors we use to describe illness. Metaphors are ways of speaking about something as if it were something else which is imaginatively but not literally applicable, for instance calling a new moon a sickle. Sontag was mainly concerned with life-threatening illnesses such as cancer and AIDS, and how the metaphors we use can serve to stigmatise the sufferers, for instance referring to AIDS as a gay plague. But people use metaphors to explain illness to themselves
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • assess the degree to which health pervades all aspects of contemporary life;

  • explore your own views on what health means to you;

  • review a range of meanings that health has for individuals and groups of individuals;

  • discuss the social and cultural significance of this range of meanings;

  • critically analyse the distinction between ‘lay’ and professional perspectives on hea
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5.6 Final words

While social work knowledge, skill and experience can make a difference to a family, the contexts in which we practise create the processes which, more than anything else, determine the life chances of us all. Whether social work always contributes to the solution of problems or sometimes actually adds to the problems that some families face is a debate which has existed as long as social work itself. On a more optimistic note, in the end, the vast majority of parents will want to do their be
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3.3 Case study 1

For much of the last century, many children who would today be regarded as being in need were caught up in the long-running child migration scheme. This scheme had been running throughout the 19th century and into the 20th century and its role was to export children to the outposts of the Empire. In all, it is estimated that 150,000 children were exported in this way (Bean and Melville, 1989). The scheme continued to run throughout the post-war years, which saw a rapid expansion of children's
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1.2.1 Boundaries and terminology

In another context Shakespeare asked, ‘What's in a name?’, and suggested by way of an answer that a rose may smell as sweet whatever it is called. In the context of social boundaries, however, the language used is actually very important in determining ‘who's in’ and ‘who's out’.

Activity 1: L
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3.8 The centrality of consent

In the last 30 years there has been a strong move away from paternalism towards an emphasis on users' rights and involvement in the decision-making process. Nowadays, few users would accept treatment without knowing what it was or a health carer who withholds information about other treatment options. The importance of involving the user is exemplified by the need for practitioners to gain informed consent. This need to gain consent is enshrined in law, as well as being a central aspec
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3.7 Ethical practice and accountability: individual practitioners’ responsibilities

The dynamics and working practices of many CAM practitioners mean the therapeutic encounters are rarely supervised and no one looks over the practitioner's shoulder. This places the responsibility to act ethically squarely with the individual practitioner. A European study of the practice of CAM states:

Ethical issues are just as pertinent for conventional and unconventional medicine, alike. The labelling of a therapy
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3.4.5 What can be agreed about ethics?

Even though every person has an idea about what acting ethically means, when faced with an ethically contentious problem, or when it is not clear what will bring about the best outcome, ‘good’ people will act in diverse, and often opposing, ways, while maintaining they are ‘doing the right thing’. While ordinary individuals also have ethical responsibilities to one another (for example, to tell the truth), the duties owed by professionals to their users go beyond everyday ethical resp
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1.8 Models of health care delivery: the salutogenic model

Whereas pathogenesis (the way disease processes develop) underpins the biomedical model, the concept of positive health, or salutogenesis, focuses on how and why people stay well. Salutogenesis can be seen either as a model in its own right or as an example of the biopsychosocial approach (Antonovsky, 1979, 1987). Antonovsky's salutogenic model was designed to advance understanding of the relationship between stressors, coping and health, with the aim of explaining how some indi
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2.4 Opportunities for play within your setting

Activity 3

2 hours 0 minutes

Aim: to explore the opportunities for play within your setting.

  1. Look at your planning for one day this wee
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2.1 Introduction

In the unit overview we explored some of the images and discourses about young people's health currently in circulation. But what assumptions are being made in these stories about what it means for a young person to be healthy, whether physically or mentally? What kind of model of wellbeing is being used in these discourses, and are there alternative approaches?


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4.7 Summary

  • Piaget proposed that all children pass through an ordered sequence of stages of cognitive development. This development arises through the processes of intrinsic motivation, assimilation and accommodation and equilibriation.

  • Children's actions on the environment are the basic building blocks of development.

  • Piaget argued that children reason differently to adults, as their mental representations of the world are initially c
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Fullbright Lecture 2012: When can international intervention be justified and effective?
The doctrine of the international community's responsibility to protect the citizens of a country whose government has failed them has strengthened the presumption in favour of international intervention for humanitarian reasons. Sir John Holmes asks: 'When can international intervention be justified and effective?'Since the Rwandan genocide, the development of the doctrine of the international community's 'responsibility to protect' the citizens of a country whose government has failed them has
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Open Classroom - 12/5/12 - #2 Eva Millona
The 2012 Election: Policy Advice to the President Topic for 12/5/12: Immigration
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19. Wallace Stevens
Modern Poetry (ENGL 310) with Langdon Hammer Wallace Stevens is considered as an unapologetically Romantic poet of imagination. His search for meaning in a universe without religion in "Sunday Morning" is likened to Crane's energetic quest for meaning and symbol. In "The Poems of Our Climate," Stevens's desire to reduce poetry to essential terms, and then his countering resistance to this impulse, are explored. Finally, "The Man on the Dump" is considered as a typically Stevensian search for tr
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