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3.4 Specialisation within language areas: brain scanning

Is there any evidence from the undamaged brain that the view derived from aphasia is indeed correct? The most useful methodologies here use either PET or functional MRI (fMRI) scanning to establish which parts of the brain are active in particular tasks. The difficulty is that a standard linguistic task, such as understanding a sentence's meaning, involves phonology and syntax and semantics, and thus is not helpful when trying to tease out which of these subtasks happens in which areas.


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Introduction

The case studies in this course introduce various typologies of heritage and the methods used to study them. The case studies help to draw attention to the fact that the heritage traditions in England, Scotland and Wales are not the same and are enshrined in slightly different legislation. Every study of heritage requires an understanding of the legal context and the traditions and history governing the object of heritage.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in
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1.7.3 Formation of prostaglandin

Figure 14 models the way that the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) catalyses the formation of prostaglandin from arachidonic acid. Note how important the shape of the arachidonic acid molecule is. It needs to be just right to match the shape of the active site on the COX molecule and, as you have seen, of the 16 possible geometrical isomers, only one will fit. The one with all the double bonds cis has all the atoms in the right place to fit into the cavity containing the active site of COX
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Feeling stressed?
This Oxford at Said seminar was dedicated to the phenomenon of stress. Sloan Mahone gives a historical perspective on the topic, Ian Brown presents latest findings on occupational stress and John Morris covers stress from a physiological perspective. Three Oxford University researchers from the areas of history of medicine, occupational health and physiology discuss how their disciplines define stress, how they approach it and what can be learned from their findings. Sloan Mahone, University Lec
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UNSPECIFIED - UNSPECIFIED Keywords:UNSPECIFIED
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3.7 Ethical practice and accountability: individual practitioners’ responsibilities

The dynamics and working practices of many CAM practitioners mean the therapeutic encounters are rarely supervised and no one looks over the practitioner's shoulder. This places the responsibility to act ethically squarely with the individual practitioner. A European study of the practice of CAM states:

Ethical issues are just as pertinent for conventional and unconventional medicine, alike. The labelling of a therapy
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1.2.1 Boundaries and terminology

In another context Shakespeare asked, ‘What's in a name?’, and suggested by way of an answer that a rose may smell as sweet whatever it is called. In the context of social boundaries, however, the language used is actually very important in determining ‘who's in’ and ‘who's out’.

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3.4.5 What can be agreed about ethics?

Even though every person has an idea about what acting ethically means, when faced with an ethically contentious problem, or when it is not clear what will bring about the best outcome, ‘good’ people will act in diverse, and often opposing, ways, while maintaining they are ‘doing the right thing’. While ordinary individuals also have ethical responsibilities to one another (for example, to tell the truth), the duties owed by professionals to their users go beyond everyday ethical resp
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • demonstrate a strategy for using skills in information literacy over an extended period of time

  • monitor progress and adapt the strategy as necessary, to achieve the quality of outcomes required

  • evaluate this overall strategy and present outcomes from your work, including citations and a bibliography.


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2.2 Making suggestions

You heard Diana and Billy making a number of suggestions during their discussion. Here are some of the expressions they used with additional examples.

Why don't …?

Why don't we go through it now?

Why don't you call Reloc to check?

Let's ...

Let's give it a more interesting
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The Heart
Professor of Clinical Anatomy Peter Abrahams demonstrates the heart with this example from the University of Warwick's collection of plastinated specimens.
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Our People: Christine Jasoni
An interview with Dr Christine Jasoni, Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology.
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Steps in conducting a systematic review
This RLO outlines the five fundamental steps to conducting a systematic review of health care research so as identify, select and critically appraise relevant research.
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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Charlie and the Cocolate Factory Reading- Chapter 13
Chapter 13. Illustration by Quentin Blake. Reading by Nance.
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The Metric System
Learn about the relationships between units in the metric system and
how to represent quantities using different units. Estimate and measure
quantities of length, mass, and capacity, and solve measurement
problems.

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Learn French - Les Verbes, Part 2
The narrator recites verbs in French as they appear in small print on the screen with an appropriate image. There is no English spoken. For beginning learners of the French language.
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3.5.4 Fungi

Fungi (e.g. species such as Penicillium which are used for manufacture of antibiotics, and yeast) are generally unicellular non-photosynthetic organisms which can tolerate acid conditions. They are capable of degrading highly complex organic compounds. They utilise much the same food sources as bacteria but they require less nitrogen since their protein content is lower. Fungi play an important role in sewage treatment.

In polluted water, particularly near to a s
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Ann Arvin (Stanford)
Molecular mechanisms of varicella-zoster virus pathogenesis
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Guide to attribution on HumBox
Guide to attribution on HumBox
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1.2.2 Psychological and sleep disturbances

The severity of hangover symptoms has also been associated with particular personality traits. For example, some research has indicated that individuals with personality traits that predispose them to a risk of alcoholism, experience more severe hangover symptoms than other people.

Although alcohol acts as a sedative, the sleep it induces can be of poorer quality and shorter duration than normal. Ethanol interferes with the action of key neurotransmitters, in particular GABA and glutama
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