Droommuseum van Dre : Arrangement In Flanders Fields
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Het In Flanders Fields Museum biedt voor het basisonderwijs het dagprogramma 'Het Droommuseum van Dre' aan. Na een bezoek aan het museum, al dan niet met workshop, kunnen klasgroepen afzakken naar de Kinderbrouwerij op het Reningelstplein in …


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El origen del hombre - National Geographic - español parte 1 de 5
Documental de National Geographic dónde podemos observar como ha evolucionado el hombre desde sus inicios. Aquí tienen el origen del hombre. (10:08)
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Where next for public health in the era of austerity?
This event was the second in a series of master class lectures jointly staged by the University of Leeds and Leeds Metropolitan University bringing together relevant senior figures and academics from across the city and surrounding region. The twenty-first century has seen a growth in political, environmental and economic insecurity in the context of global recession, population ageing and climate change. Responding to these threats involves rethinking how we work together, care for ourselves,
Author(s): Professor Paul Johnstone,Leeds Metropolitan Univer

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Journalist Goes Inside Fort Knox
On September 23rd 1974. British ITN Journalist Michael Brunson goes inside at Fort Knox. Brunson was one of a select group of journalists and politicians invited to see inside the Gold Bullion depository as part of a PR exercise to counter the conspiracy theory that the Vault was empty. No-one has been invited to tour the Vault since. (2:53)

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In Conversation with Smiley & West
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Approaches to Sociological Research
OpenStax College
Define and describe the scientific method Explain how the scientific method is used in sociological research Understand the function and importance of an […]

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Theoretical Perspectives
OpenStax College
Explain what sociological theories are and how they are used Understand the similarities and differences between structural functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic […]

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Bob Uecker Loves Wisconsin
In this History Channel States video, Bob Uecker, former Milwaukee Braves player and also a sportscaster, discusses the pleasures of living in Wisconsin. The Midwest state brings both the love of the game and life's simple enjoyments together. (2:26)
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Cálculo
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Author(s): Alicia de Los Santos Pineda

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This Week @Minnesota: Top 10 of 2011-2012
Feeling nostalgic about the past year at the U? Relive the fun by checking out the best of This Week @Minnesota from 2011-12! The top 10 most-viewed videos from This Week @Minnesota showcase 30 events from the Twin Cities Campus. Learn more: http://z.umn.edu/7ro
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How to grow Yeast
By: Singer Instruments How to grow / culture yeast on agar or in YPD: We show you how to prepare fresh cultures of yeast from previously grown agar plates. Spruce up your old yeast cultures by replating onto fresh media or liquid YPD, or select colonies of interest to be expanded. Find out more http://www.singerinstruments.com
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Wereldoorlog I : Werkbladen
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In acht bladzijden wordt het verloop van de eerste wereldoorlog op een eenvoudige manier uitgelegd. Dit met behulp van de nodige kaarten en foto's.


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5.3 Event-related potentials

When a sense organ (eye, ear, etc.) receives a stimulus, the event eventually causes neurons to ‘fire’ (i.e. produce electrical discharges) in the receiving area of the brain. The information is sent on from these first sites to other brain areas. With appropriate apparatus and techniques it is possible to record the electrical signals, using electrodes attached to the scalp. The electrical potentials recorded are called event-related potentials (ERPs), since they dependably f
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

4.2 The effects of irrelevant speech

Imagine watching a computer screen, on which a series of digits is flashed, at a nice easy rate of one per second. After six items you have to report what the digits had been, in the order presented (this is called serial recall). Not a very difficult task, you might think, but what if someone were talking nearby? It turns out that, even when participants are instructed to ignore the speech completely, their recall performance drops by at least 30 per cent (Jones, 1999).

In the context
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3.4 The ‘flanker’ effect

A potential problem for the feature integration theory is the fact that the time taken to understand the meaning of a printed word can be influenced by other, nearby words. Of itself, this is not surprising, because it is well known that one word can prime (i.e. speed decisions to) another related word; the example nurse – doctor was given in Section 1.4. However, Shaffer and LaBerge (1979) found priming effects, even when t
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2.1 Introduction

I introduced Section 1 by suggesting that the auditory system had a special problem: unlike the visual system, it needed processes which would permit a listener to attend to a specific set of sounds without being confused by the overlap of other, irrelevant noises. The implication of that line of argument was that vision had no need of any such system. However, although we do not see simultaneously everything that surrounds us, we can certainly see more than one thing at a time. Earlie
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1.5 Summary of Section 1

The auditory system is able to process sounds in such a way that, although several may be present simultaneously, it is possible to focus upon the message of interest. However, in experiments on auditory attention, there have been contradictory results concerning the fate of the unattended material:

  • The auditory system processes mixed sounds in such a way that it is possible to focus upon a single wanted message.

  • Unattended material a
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1.4 Eavesdropping on the unattended message

It was not long before researchers devised more complex ways of testing Broadbent's theory of attention, and it soon became clear that it could not be entirely correct. Even in the absence of formal experiments, common experiences might lead one to question the theory. An oft-cited example is the cocktail party effect. Imagine you are attending a noisy party, but your auditory location system is working wonderfully, enabling you to focus upon one particular conversation. Suddenly, from
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1.3 Attending to sounds

From the earlier sections, you will appreciate that the auditory system is able to separate different, superimposed sounds on the basis of their different source directions. This makes it possible to attend to any one sound without confusion, and we have the sensation of moving our ‘listening attention’ to focus on the desired sound. For example, as I write this I can listen to the quiet hum of the computer in front of me, or swing my attention to the bird song outside the window to
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1.2 Disentangling sounds

If you are still feeling aggrieved about the shortcomings of evolution, then you might take heart from the remarkable way in which the auditory system has evolved so as to avoid a serious potential problem. Unlike our eyes, our ears cannot be directed so as to avoid registering material that we wish to ignore; whatever sounds are present in the environment, we must inevitably be exposed to them. In a busy setting such as a party we are swamped by simultaneous sounds – people in different pa
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University