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Introduction

The material presented here raises general themes of order and disorder, the way they are represented or signified, and the place of crime in these representations. The material is based upon an audio file, originally 29 minutes in length, and examines the problem of crime in relation to the city of Glasgow. It was recorded in 1999.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 2 study in Author(s): The Open University

6.2 Actors

Iteration is a natural part of the modelling process. It does not matter whether you start by looking for the actors or the use cases. We have chosen to begin with the actors, since it is a way of expressing the system boundary implicitly and identifying the different views that need to be taken into account. In practice, you are likely to find that the actors are to be found in the roles that people play as employees in the problem domain, such as the hotel's receptionist or manager.

A
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3.2 A summary of the phases and activities of learning how to learn

We can represent the process of learning how to learn in a diagram with four phases (Figure 1).

This image shows a mapping diagram, which consists of four boxes connect</span><br><span class=Author(s): The Open University

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8 Part B: Evidencing your problem-solving skills

This Part requires you to present an example of your work to show that you can explore a problem and follow it through to completion. For example, setting up a project to monitor landfill and associated pollution levels; or developing and implementing a work rota for a care course to cover 24 hours, 7 days per week with on-call facilities.

The example you select to evidence your skills in problem solving must meet the criteria in Author(s): The Open University

7.4 Evaluating your strategy and assessing your work

Present a reflective summary that gives details of:

  • A judgement of your own progress and performance in using problem-solving skills, including an assessment of your progress. Discuss your use of criteria and feedback comments to help you assess your progress.

  • Those factors that had the greatest effect on your achieving what you set out to do, including those that worked well to help you improve and those that worked less well.

  • <
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7.3 Monitoring your progress

Use your records or logbook to help you present a commentary that includes:

  • The methods you used to work on the problem.

  • A statement that shows how you have used your knowledge of problem-solving methods for selecting particular methods and reasons for the selection to achieve the standard of work required.

  • The checking procedures you used for the problem, for example, interim checks, progress reports, feedback comments, a
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5 Effective use of information literacy skills

The purpose of this assessment course is for you to create a portfolio of your work that shows you can improve your information literacy skills and apply them within your study or work activities. A central aim is for you to use the process to support your learning and improve your performance overall.

You will need to show that you can search for, select and critically evaluate information. Using information literacy skills effectively involves applying your skills appropriately in dif
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2 Sources of help

This assessment course is designed to be self-contained. However you might like to access the following sources for support and guidance if you need it. These sources include:

  • U529_1 Key skills – making a difference: This OpenLearn course is designed to complement the assessment courses. It provides detailed guidance and activities to help you work on your key skills, gives examples of key skills work from students, and helps you prepare and s
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9 Notes to help you complete your assessment

To complete your assessment portfolio you must include a contents page indicating how your reflective commentary in Part A and your evidence in Part B are related. An example of a suitable format for the contents page is in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1 (PDF, 1 page, 0.1MB)

Although the requirements of Parts A and B are listed separately
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1 Information and communication

This Key Skills Assessment Course offers an opportunity for you to select and prepare work that demonstrates your key skills in the area of communication.

This course provides you with advice and information on how to go about presenting your key skills work as a portfolio.

In presenting work that demonstrates your key skills you are taking the initiative to show that you can develop and improve a particular set of skills, and are able to use your skills more generally in your st
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Computing & IT. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance, and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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1 2.6 Bar charts

In a bar chart, information is represented by a series of bars of different heights or lengths. A bar chart has two axes, and labels on each tell us about the information being represented.

Figure 3 is a bar chart which shows how the percentages of people with home access to the internet have changed between 1998 and 2004.

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1.1.1 Operating the Windows calculator

The Windows calculator is supplied with the Windows operating system. This section provides you with basic instructions for its use, and a few practice activities. The Windows calculator also provides a help menu that you can use.


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4 Conclusion

This course has given you a good many tips about what is useful and what things to avoid. These tips are just the beginning of the practical ‘know-how’ you'll develop once you've begun your MST study. Some of the skills you'll learn will be specific to the particular subjects you're studying – biologists have different diagrammatic ‘tools of the trade’ from mathematicians, computer enthusiasts and physicists. Other, more general skills will be central to actually studying and to ref
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3.1.3 Option 3: Linking the diagrams to a case

This can be a very useful option. Rather than just using the diagram as a general example, you could pick on one or more specific diseases and discuss how they relate to the general picture. By doing this, you have undertaken some specific new learning and demonstrated that you have applied that new knowledge or understanding in a creative way. In this example, the diagram is not an appendage to the discussion, hanging out on a ‘limb’, but has been used as part of the central ‘body’ o
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3.1.2 Option 2: Copying out diagrams

I am trying to encourage you to use diagrams, but there is a pitfall associated with this option. This option is one that many students do use, so it's worth exploring why it is not a particularly good idea. The following is a slight parody of the sort of written assignment I have in mind. The text reads something like this:

‘There are many ways in which diseases can be spread, see Figure 1.’

There then follows ‘Figure 1’ which is a direct copy of the diagram from the sour
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2.2.3 Reading graphs and charts: getting started

Graphs and charts ought to be easy to read, since the main point of turning numbers into diagrams is to bring out their meaning more clearly. However, they are abstract representations that attempt to summarise certain aspects of the world in a condensed form. Consequently, they require a degree of mental effort on your part to bridge the gap between the formal pictures on the page and the aspects of ‘reality’ they represent. It is important to approach graphs and diagrams caref
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2.2.2 Reading graphs and charts: manipulating numbers

Text is just one way of communicating information. Numbers are another way, but whether presented singly, in groups or even as tables , numbers often require a lot of work from the reader to uncover the message. A much more immediate and powerful way to present numerical information is to use graphs and charts. When you use single numbers or tables, the reader has to visualise the meaning of the numbers. Graphs and charts allow the reader to do this at a glance. To show how powerful these rep
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5.1.10 Philosophy

Flew, A. (ed.) (1979) A Dictionary of Philosophy, London, Pan Books.

Bunnin, N., and Tsui-James, E.P.> (eds) (1996) The Blackwell Companion to Philosophy, Oxford, Blackwell.


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3.7.2 Language

Your language should be direct rather than fancy. Don't strive for effect. You should always go for short and simple sentences where you can – especially when you are building up a basic essay-writing style. You can play with more elaborate words and grammatical structures later, when you have established a secure basic technique. Don't beat about the bush; pitch straight in to answering the essay question in a direct, purposeful way.


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