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2. Starters

We all have pictures in our heads but some people use them more than others.

‘Doing’ can often be the most powerful way to learn. Before discussing other people's thoughts on visualisation, it is probably worthwhile to spend some time exploring some visualisation activities with your colleagues. This should enable you to consider the next section from an experiential perspective.


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5 Conclusion

I hope this unit has made clearer what a business manager can do to impact positively on the school and its core function of teaching and learning as we move forward into a changing future.

You may now find it helpful to revisit your job description and the notes you made in Activity 1.

Equally, through some of the new developments that are taking place in society, the school itself will need business management in order to best position itself to help pupils, parents and communit
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4 Putting plans into action

In part, the business manager can and should be an ‘educational resource manager’. By having someone who concentrates on areas such as administration, facilities management or human resources, it allows others to focus on teaching.

When I applied for the post of business and community manager, the advertisement specified that the successful candidate would have ‘an empathy and understanding of comprehensive education’.

The head explained after my appointment that he did no
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Learning outcomes

Once you have completed this unit you will be able to:

  • clarify your own ideas on literacy criticism;

  • explore with your pupils what makes a good book;

  • produce a range of writing frames to encourage pupils to write book reviews;

  • encourage your pupils to follow some of the award schemes for children's books and perhaps start one of your own.


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2 Creative communities and ICT

We oppose

‘any prophetic pedagogy

which knows everything before it happens,

which teaches children

that every day is the same,

that there are no surprises,

and teaches adults

that all they have to do is repeat
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5 Summary and conclusion

In this unit we have considered questions surrounding the future of school geography. This may at first seem an odd question, but it is salutary to remember that the advocates of geography had to work very hard to make the case for the subject's place in the English National Curriculum.

As the unit sought to show, even if we can agree that geography has an important role to play in schools, opinions vary as to the purpose of the subject:

  • Is it a
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4 The student's view

Activity 3 should have helped you to clarify your ideas about the aims and purposes of geography education. One of the advantages of doing this is that it encourages you to focus on what you think is important about teaching geography. In our experience, this is sometimes difficult given the hectic pace of life in schools!

Missing so far in this discussion has been the voice of the students who are on the ‘receiving end’ of geography lessons. After all, they are the people who will
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2 The purposes of geography in schools

The evidence shows that students who study geography through their school lives become some of the most employable people in our society. The organisation [the Geographical Association] comments: ‘Surely all parents would wish their children to engage with a subject that improves their life chances and helps them to develop an informed concern for the world and an ability and willingness to take positive action, both l
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1 Visions of geography: an introduction

In considering the image which best reflects your ‘vision’ of geography, perhaps it is the volcano, which is a testament to the ‘awe and wonder’ of the natural world? Or is your vision to help young people make sense of the gross inequalities that exist in the world?

Geography teaching is also about providing young people with the skills that help them fit into the demands of an increasingly globalised economy. There is the argument that geography teaching is at its best when it
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Introduction

Participating in the democratic processes is seen as being a fundamental aspect of citizenship. All pupils need a broad knowledge and understanding of the rights, responsibilities and duties of citizens, as well as an understanding of forms of government. Notions of citizenship have been forged alongside the expansion of the right to vote and the development of our ideas about democracy. In this unit we explore different interpretations of democracy and strategies for involving pupils in con
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3.1 Transition points for 11–19 year-olds

When 16 year-old Mike Barker told people he wanted to be a film director they laughed at him… Mike's long journey to Hollywood stardom as a director began with a teacher at his school who instilled a sense of confidence into the discouraged teenager. ‘I was going to leave school at 16 and get a job because I wanted a motorbike, but she persuaded me to do my A levels. I told her about wanting to be in the film industry a
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should have gained an understanding of:

  • the rationale for careers education and guidance (CEG) and young people's need for it;

  • your school's statutory responsibilities for CEG and its links with Connexions;

  • the basic knowledge and skills needed to help students access careers information and guidance;

  • the school's CEG programme and the confidence to carry out your role in it.


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References

Jones, T. (1999) ‘Art and Lifelong Learning’, Journal of Art and Design Education, 18 (1), p. 138.

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1. Why Teach Art?

Acquisition of sight precedes language. In a tangible sense visual engagement with the world situates us and defines who we are.

Consider the three following non-linguistic signs.

Figure 1

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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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References

Hagger, H. and McIntyre, D. (1994) Learning Through Analysing Practice, Reading 8, Mentoring in Secondary Schools: A professional development programme, Milton Keynes, The Open University.
Maynard, T. and Furlong, J. (1993) ‘Learning to teach and models of mentoring’, in McIntyre, D., Hagger, H. and Wilkin, M. (eds) Mentoring: perspectives on school-based teacher education, London, Kogan Page

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6.4 After the school experience review

The mentor and school co-ordinator will formally record the student teacher's assessment outcomes in the school experience report, sign a copy of this and send it with the required documentation for each level to the Open University.

The student teacher will complete the assessment tasks for their assessment portfolio and send it to their tutor. The student teacher prepares for the next level of work by recording their progress and identifying priorities subject knowledge audit screens.
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6.1 Introduction

At the end of every school experience placement the mentor and student teacher will hold a school experience review meeting.

This is an essential element of the placement. It is an opportunity for unresolved issues as well as achievements to be discussed and plans for future successful progress to be made. It is particularly important that the student teacher understands the assessment and comments that are to go in the school experience report, and that the implications for future prof
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5.3.6 After the visit

Following the visit the tutor must:

  • submit a school visit report to the Open University;

  • contact the subject leader via email immediately after the visit if there are progress issues to discuss;

  • write to the school co-ordinator and mentor thanking them for arranging the day and confirming the assessment judgement and targets for progress;

  • send a supportive and encouraging email to the student teacher
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5.2 Before the visit

In preparation for the visit the tutor will need to:

  • Telephone the school to agree a date and time with the mentor and school co-ordinator for the visit.

  • Write to the school confirming the visit. This letter should:

     

    1. set out the tasks and activities the mentor will need to do;

    2. request that a focus for the observation is agreed with the student teacher and mentor;


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