5 Effective use of problem solving skills

The purpose of this assessment unit is for you to create a portfolio of your work to represent your skills in problem solving within your study or work activities. This will involve using criteria to help you select examples of your work that clearly show you can use and improve your skills in problem solving. However, by far the most important aim is that you can use this assessment process to support your learning and improve your performance overall.

Using problem-solving skills is n
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3 Key skills assessment units

This section gives advice and guidance to help you compile and present a portfolio of selected work. You are strongly advised to read through this section so that you have an idea of what is expected.

The key skills assessment units provide an opportunity for you to integrate your development of key skills with your work or study. You may choose to concentrate on skills that you need to develop and improve for your job, for a new course, or personally to help you keep abreast of new dev
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2 Sources of help

This assessment unit is designed to be self-contained. However you might like to access the following sources for support and guidance if you need it. These sources include:

  • U529_1 Key skills – making a difference: This OpenLearn unit is designed to complement the assessment units. It provides detailed guidance and activities to help you work on your key skills, gives examples of key skills work from students, and helps you prepare an
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1 Developing your problem solving skills

This Key Skill Assessment Unit offers an opportunity for you to select and prepare work that demonstrates your key skills in the area of problem solving.

This unit provides you with advice and information on how to go about presenting your key skills work as a portfolio.

In presenting work that demonstrates your key skills you are taking the initiative to show that you can develop and improve a particular set of skills, and are able to use your skills more generally in your studi
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Learning outcomes

Having studied this unit you should be able to:

  • develop a strategy for using skills in problem solving over an extended period of time;

  • monitor progress and adapt your strategy as necessary, to achieve the quality of outcomes required when tackling a complex problem;

  • evaluate your overall strategy and present the outcomes from your work using a variety or methods.


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Introduction

This key skill develops your problem-solving skills in your studies, work or other activities over a period of time. To tackle this key skill, you will need to plan your work over at least 3–4 months to give yourself enough time to practise and improve your skills, to seek feedback from others, and to monitor your progress and evaluate your strategy.

Problem solving runs through many other activities and, rather like the key skill in OpenLearn unit U071_1 Improving own learning and
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2.3.3 Material data

A third kind of data is ‘material’ and provides more direct evidence from bodies and brains. This comes from biological psychology and includes biochemical analyses of hormones, cellular analyses, decoding of the human genome and neuropsychological technologies such as brain-imaging techniques. The data that can be collected from the various forms of brain imaging provide direct evidence about structures in the brain and brain functioning, enabling direct links to be made with behaviours
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References

Creese M. & Earley P., (1999) Improving Schools and Governing Bodies, Routledge, London.
DfES (2003), National Training Programme for New Governors, Module 2.
Gann N., (1998) Improving School Governance – How Better Governors Make Better Schools, Falmer Press, London.
Martin J. & Holt A., (2002) Joined-up Gove
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References

http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/ts/informationcentre/nattar/
Creese, M. and Earley, P. (1999) Improving Schools and Governing Bodies: Making a difference, Routledge, London. p. 52.
National training Programme for New Governors – 2003. Module 2, ‘The critical friend’, pages 56–61.
‘Governors and target setting’; The
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1.1.1 Why set targets?

To support student development as a whole, the governing body needs to think about the wider aspects of the school, as well as simply looking for success in tests and public examinations. For example, a school may have, as a whole-school objective, raising the number of students who stay on into post-16 education. This may not necessarily raise results at GCSE immediately, but if successful, over time, the benefits may be threefold:

  1. it will have a pos
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3 Deciding priorities

See below for the cycle of prioritising, if you wish to view this animation in a separate window please click on 'Launch in seperate player'.

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3.13.5 Simulations

Simulation of magnification  and certain visual impairments

WebAIM screen reader simulation

WebAIM visual impairment simulation


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5 Giving feedback

In order to develop and improve dance skills, students should also be involved in evaluating one another's, and their own, work.

Performing for one another in class as part of an evaluation and feedback process can be beneficial to both the students and teacher.

When done on a regular basis, students can become less self-conscious about performing in front of others; this is important in terms of building confidence in young performers.

Feedback is an important part of the i
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4.8.2 Word clusters

Actividad 4.7

Which of the following adjectives go with the nouns below? Cross the odd one out. The first has been done for you.

Tache el intruso.

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Learning outcomes

Using the French you have learned, by the end of this section you should be able to:

  • understand and give descriptions of events in the past

  • understand and ask questions about events in the past

  • understand and express intentions

  • understand people talking about 14 July


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2.4 Defining terms

Why are we spending so much time and energy on asking whether Lynne is a carer? Does it matter? It would matter if Lynne wanted to apply for financial or practical support as a carer. It matters to budget holders to know how many people qualify, because carers are eligible for financial assistance. It would also matter to organisations which campaign for the needs of carers – organisations like the Carers National Association, Mencap, Age Concern or MIND. It would matter to a social worker
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3.5 Benzodiazepine tranquillisers, Prozac and the SSRIs

One of the most significant ranges of drugs ever produced is the benzodiazepine tranquillisers (usually classed as ‘minor tranquillisers’ or ‘hypnotics’), often prescribed as a remedy for ‘minor’ disorders such as depression, sleeplessness and anxiety. In effect, they extended the range of conditions that could be treated by medication. The best-known example is probably Valium.

1.1 Themes shaping practice

There are five main themes running through this unit. These themes, though not uncontested or fixed, are based on core principles and ideas that shape practice in the field of social care and social work in the statutory, independent and voluntary sectors. They are:

  1. Partnership

  2. Empowerment and anti-oppressive practice

  3. Rights

  4. Accountability

  5. Valuing diversity.

Below you
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Understanding society: Families
Here you will explore how different families have different ideas about how work in the home should be divided. You will also investigate the diversity of families. We will see how any discussion of the division of labour has to recognise that families differ in terms of shape and size. First published on Fri, 06 Jan 2012 as Author(s): Creator not set

3.3.2 Collaborative structuring (sometimes called ‘structuring situations and transferring re

Rogoff et al. argue that parents and other caregivers are active in structuring children's environment according to their perceived goals for development. There are several levels of structure. At a macro level is the overall timetable of the child's day (the balance of time for play, tasks, feeding, washing, resting, etc.), the opportunities for participation in specific cultural activities and the extent to which these activities are separated/integrated. At a micro level is the way
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