ESRC
Climate Ethics and Climate Economics
An ESRC seminar series
University of Nottingham
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Fat Tails - Imposing and Redistributing Risks

Date: 13-15 September 2016

Location: London School of Economics

Convenors: Kai Spiekermann and Jonathan Aldred

 
Schedule

13 September

Public lecture: Climate (and other) catastrophes
Robert Pindyck
London School of Economics
Clement House, Room CLM.2.02, 6.30pm

More information

14-15 September

Workshop: Fat Tails - Imposing and Redistributing Risks
London School of Economics

15 September

Public lecture: Climate ethics: embracing justice, avoiding extortion

Stephen Gardiner
London School of Economics
Clement House, Room CLM.2.02, 6.30pm
More information


Keynote speakers

  • Professor Stephen Gardiner, University of Washington
  • Professor Robert S Pindyck, MIT

Register

We are now looking for participants. Priority will be given to participants willing to act as discussants. Please pre-register here.

Further information

This workshop will focus on large-scale risks caused by climate change. In particular, we are interested in discussing theoretical, empirical and normative questions arising from large-scale risks and so-called "fat tail" risk distributions. The realizations that climate change may well be catastrophic and the probabilities of catastrophic outcomes difficult to quantify has shifted the debate towards more "precautionary" approaches. Debates about the most rational response to large scale risks and uncertainty should be complemented by a normative analysis of risk imposition: under which conditions, if any, is it permissible to impose such risks or redistribute them from one group to another? The workshop seeks to bring together economists, philosophers and practitioners to tackle these pressing questions.

Papers will be pre-circulated, with short presentations and comments from discussants.

Confirmed Speakers

  • Professor Stephen Gardiner, University of Washington
  • Professor Robert S. Pindyck, MIT
  • Dr Simon Beard, Cambridge
  • Professor Simon Dietz, LSE
  • Eike Düvel, Graz
  • Dr Jonathan Herington, Kansas State University
  • Professor James Lenman, Sheffield
  • Kian Mintz-Woo, Graz
  • Dr Matthew Rendall, Nottingham
  • Vera Van Gool, Reading
 

 

 

Climate Ethics and Climate Economics

Email: climateethicseconomics@nottingham.ac.uk