Educational outcomes following preterm birth

8. Resources

Please select any of the folllowing buttons to view further information related to this learning resource.

Glossary

TermDefinition
Academic attainment

The extent to which an individual child has achieved educational goals, such as performance on school attainment tests or whether they meet educational standards.

Developmental problems

Range of delays or difficulties in the development of physical, sensory, cognitive, communicative or social and emotional skills. Developmental problems may be transitory or may extend into childhood and adolescence.

Further education

Academic or vocational training that is taken after secondary education but that is not part of higher education in the UK.

Higher education

Academic or vocational training offered by a university or college of higher education that typically results in an undergraduate or postgraduate degree or diploma.

National curriculum

A set of subjects and standards used by schools in the UK to ensure that all children learn the same thing. The national curriculum covers what subjects should be taught and the standards children should reach in each subject.

Primary school

A school in which children receive compulsory education from age 5 to 11 years. In the UK, this comprises a reception year for children aged 4 to 5 years, and Years 1 to 6 of formal education. Year 6 is the final year attended by children aged 10 to 11 years.

Secondary school

A school in which young people receive compulsory education from age 11 to 16 years. In the UK, this comprises Years 7 to 11 of formal education. Year 11 is the final year attended by children aged 15 to 16 years.

Special Educational Needs

Learning difficulties or disabilities that make it harder for a child to learn than other children of a similar age.

Key Stage 1

The UK National Curriculum is divided in to four Key Stages for different year groups. Key Stage 1 is taught in primary school years 1 and 2 to children aged 5 to 7 years.

Key Stage 2

The UK National Curriculum is divided in to four Key Stages for different year groups. Key Stage 2 is taught in primary school years 3, 4, 5 and 6 to children aged 7 to 11 years.

Key Stage 3

The UK National Curriculum is divided in to four Key Stages for different year groups. Key Stage 3 is taught in secondary school years 7, 8 and 9 to children aged 11 to 14 years.

Key Stage 4

The UK National Curriculum is divided in to four Key Stages for different year groups. Key Stage 4 is taught in secondary school years 10 and 11 to children aged 14 to 16 years.

Learning outcomes

By completing this resource you will be able to:

  • To understand that children born preterm are at risk of special educational needs and poor academic attainment
  • To identify which school subjects children born preterm are most likely to struggle with

This resource was developed by:

We would like to thank the following people who all helped in the development of this resource:

Content authors: Samantha Johnson, Sarah Clayton, Lucy Cragg, Camilla Gilmore, Rose Griffiths, Neil Marlow, Victoria Simms.

Technical developers: Heather Wharrad, Aaron Fecowycz, Lydia Jones, Mike Taylor.

Content reviewers: Dr Jonathan Cusack, Consultant Neonatologist, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust; Alison Brown, Teacher; Olivia Smith, Teacher.

Acknowledgements: With thanks to the participants of the PRISM-2 Study Stakeholder Workshop for their role in co-designing this resource.

Funding: The development of this resource was funded by Action Medical Research

Learning Object Copyright and Terms of Use

All Learning Objects developed by the University of Nottingham School of Health Sciences, and their aggregate parts (eg text, animations), are copyright of the School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham. Learning Objects are available for use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License and the conditions below.

Terms of Use

Private individuals, and publicly-funded educational and other institutions, may link to and use the Learning Objects on this site without restriction for non-commercial educational purposes. Use of any Learning Objects for any commercial purpose, or by any profit-making commercial entity, is not permitted without our express permission. If you wish to use a Learning Object for any commercial, revenue-generating or non-educational purpose, you must contact us to negotiate terms of use and payment.

We much prefer that you use this and other Learning Objects by linking to them on this website as:

  • this ensures you're always using the most up-to-date version
  • we gain data on usage of the Learning Objects, from access statistics and user feedback forms

Local circumstances, such as network security policies, may constrain your ability to link to external sites, or may impair the usability of our objects. If you're unable to run our Learning Objects 'from source' for these or other reasons, please contact us with a brief explanation of your circumstances and we may provide you with specified Learning Objects as an IMS Content Package.

Modification

Modification to adapt Learning Objects to local circumstances is permitted, with the following restrictions:

  1. The modified version must clearly display the University of Nottingham logo, and the School copyright notice.
  2. The modified version must not be distributed outside the modifying institution without the express permission of the School.

Contacts

If you have any queries about our Learning Objects, please contact prism@le.ac.uk

Attribution

Please use the attribution below if you wish to refer to our learning objects. If you use Firefox, you can install the useful OpenAttribute add-on to allow you to easily copy and reference these and other materials marked as Creative Commons.

Creative Commons logo Learning Objects for Healthcare by School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

References

Chan, E., & Quigley, M. A. (2014). School performance at age 7 years in late preterm and early term birth: a cohort study. Archives of Disease in Childhood-Fetal and Neonatal Edition, 99(6), F451-F457. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2014-306557

Cooke, R. W. I. (2004). Health, lifestyle, and quality of life for young adults born very preterm. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 89(3), 201-206. doi: 10.1136/adc.2003.030197

Johnson, S., Hennessy, E., Smith, R., Trikic, R., Wolke, D., & Marlow, N. (2009). Academic attainment and special educational needs in extremely preterm children at 11 years of age: the EPICure study. Archives of Disease in Childhood-Fetal and Neonatal Edition, 94(4), F283-F289. doi: 10.1136/adc.2008.152793

Johnson, S., & Marlow, N. (2016). Early and long-term outcome of infants born extremely preterm. Archives of disease in childhood, 102, 97-102. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2015-309581

MacKay, D. F., Smith, G. C. S., Dobbie, R., & Pell, J. P. (2010). Gestational Age at Delivery and Special Educational Need: Retrospective Cohort Study of 407,503 Schoolchildren. PLOS Medicine 7(6): e1000289. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000289

Quigley, M. A., Poulsen, G., Boyle, E., Wolke, D., Field, D., Alfirevic, Z., & Kurinczuk, J. J. (2012). Early term and late preterm birth are associated with poorer school performance at age 5 years: a cohort study. Archives of Disease in Childhood-Fetal and Neonatal Edition97(3), F167-F173. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2011-300888

Simms, V., Gilmore, C., Cragg, L., Clayton, S., Marlow, N., & Johnson, S. (2015). Nature and origins of mathematics difficulties in very preterm children: a different etiology than developmental dyscalculia. Pediatric research, 77(2), 389. doi: 10.1038/pr.2014.184