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Quantum physics, metal and me

The ‘Iron Maiden’ compound is an especially energetic form of the metal that has been the backdrop to many hours slaving over a scanning probe microscope
Vision Education Quantum physics, metal and me

Iron has been a very heavy influence throughout my academic career. Not in its raw elemental form, but as part of the ‘Iron Maiden’ compound – an especially energetic form of the metal that has been the backdrop to many hours slaving over a scanning probe microscope and/or a synchrotron beamline.

I am not alone in this appreciation of the heavier things in life – a Venn diagram of physicists and metal music fans has quite some overlap.

That’s one of the reasons I wrote When The Uncertainty Principle Goes To 11 (or How To Explain Quantum Physics With Heavy Metal) (Ben Bella Books, 2018). I wanted to bring together two of my favourite things – metal and physics – and explore just how heavy-as-le(a)d riffs and, um, spandex pants could explain quantum mechanics. The juxtaposition also appeals: one has a fearsome reputation for being intellectually challenging. The other hasn’t.

I am not alone in this appreciation of the heavier things in life – a Venn diagram of physicists and metal music fans has quite some overlap.
Professor Philip Moriarty

By bridging the divide between art and science – and yes, heavy metal is an art form – we can engage a wider audience. Joshua Wood, over at Metal-Rules.com, put it like this: “So what on earth would possess me to read a book about quantum physics, something I’m not really interested in and know little about? Well, the answer is simple; that natural desire to improve myself coupled with the power of metal!”

Philip Moriarty

Philip Moriarty is a Professor of Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy.

Vision magazine front cover - Issue 4, Autumn 2019

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