2.2.3 Cystic fibrosis

A different model for the genetic tests of the future is screening for cystic fibrosis (CF). This is a DNA-based test, which became possible after the gene involved in CF was identified in 1989. CF is a recessive disease, and it should be easy to test to see if prospective parents carry a mutated allele. A simple mouthwash yields enough cells for DNA extraction. If both partners are carriers, they can consider further counselling before conception, and/or pre-natal testing of any potentially
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4.3 Golden Rice in the public domain

In January 2000, the successful experiments were announced in a paper published in the American journal Science. This, in itself, is significant. Generally, work on genetic manipulation would be published in one of a number of more specialist journals. Publication in a journal like Science indicates that this was important work, likely to be of interest to a wider audience. In its 'Notes for Authors', the journal states that 'Priority is given to papers that reveal novel concept
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3 Silences and concealment

Anthropologists and psychoanalysts use the term ‘taboo’ to describe forbidden activities, feelings or relationships. All societies seem to have particular rules and rituals to deal with bodily functions, sexuality and death, sometimes expressed in terms of hygiene or religion, and these keep them separated off from everyday life. When social rules function well they are invisible. We only notice them when we have committed a faux pas and caused embarrassment.

Marie very quick
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Why Jupiter Has a Giant Red Spot | How the Universe Works
Jupiter's weather doesn't come from the sun; it comes from deep within the planet, itself. This heat and the planet's incredible rotation speed create the mega storms on Jupiter's surface--including the great red spot. (02:18)

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Building a Business: Evaluating a Venture Idea
Pegram Harrison, Fellow in Entrepreneurship at the Said Business School, presents the 2nd lecture of the 2011/12 Building a Business lecture series.
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Rights not set

2.2.4 Longer-term considerations

Something else to ponder is the effect that screening might have on the longer-term incidence of disease and (not the same thing) on the incidence of gene variants linked to disease. Sometimes, the impact on a disease can be dramatic. Take thalassaemia, a haemoglobin disorder similar to sickle cell disease, in which premature destruction of haemoglobin-containing red blood cells leads to anaemia. It is relatively common in some Mediterranean countries. Like sickle cell disease, it is understo
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1.2 How does it hurt?

This is a useful question because once we know the mechanism of pain sensation we can do something about alleviating it.

When tissue is injured there follows a rapid release of ‘messenger’ chemicals that stimulate the nerve endings. Electrical impulses are relayed through the nerves to the spinal column and to the brain, which registers the sensation of pain. It usually, but not always, also directs our attention to the site where the damaged tissue initiated the pain message.


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535 GG Anyways or Anyway? Topic Sentences
FOLLOW ALONG ON THE WEBSITE Anyway or Anyways? http://bit.ly/AnywayAnyways How to Write a Good Topic Sentence: http://bit.ly/Topic-Sentence SPONSORS http://ag.co/grammar Use the code "grammar" at checkout for a discount. AMAZON AFFILIATE CODE http://quickanddirtytips.com/amazon FOLLOW GRAMMAR GIRL Twitter: http://twitter.com/grammargirl Facebook: http://facebook.com/grammargirl Snapchat: http://snapchat.com/add/thatgrammargirl Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/realgrammargirl I
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2.2.1 Phenylketonuria

The classic example of population screening is testing new-born babies for phenylketonuria (PKU). Individuals with PKU fail to make a protein, a certain enzyme, and develop mental retardation. The absence of the enzyme results in both an accumulation of phenylalanine, which causes the mental retardation, and a deficiency of tyrosine in the body, as shown in Author(s): The Open University

2.12 Faites le bilan: Sessions 6 – 10

Now that you have finished the last five sessions of this course, you should be able to:


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The History of Vaccines
The History of Vaccines - Kids are taught about the unique ways in which animals have adapted and evolved to survive in their surroundings. Humans have created their own ways of adapting to the elements. (04:17)
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Lord Owen: British Foreign Policy after Brexit
In this IPR Public Lecture Lord David Owen – former Foreign Secretary and founder of the Social Democratic Party – discusses his advocacy for leaving the EU, and explores what foreign policy might look like after Brexit. This IPR Public Lecture took place on 18 January 2018.
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1.1.1 Inheritance of characters

Imagine you have found some old family photograph albums which span many generations. What are the distinctive family features, or characters, that demonstrate the relatedness of individuals? In other words, what characters do they have in common? For example, they might have brown eyes, a white forelock in their hair, ears that are closely attached to the head, that is, without lobes. But you will also notice the striking differences between related individuals. For example, they may differ
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3.4 Evaluation at the end of a project

Different types of evaluation may take place at the end of a project. A common one is determining the extent to which the project outcomes have been achieved. This is often done in a meeting of the sponsor, key stakeholders and project team leaders, and sometimes informed by reports from key perspectives. An evaluation of this nature may be the final stage of the project, and the main purpose might be to ensure that the project has met all of the contracted expectations and can be ‘signed o
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8.2 Chromosome scaffolds

Most of the chromosomal DNA chains within the interphase nucleus are believed to be held on a scaffold or backbone structure made from various proteins, with loops of between 20 and 200 kb extruding from attachment sites. This chromosome structure is shown schematically in Figure 40. The scaffold, as well as permitting further compaction, serves to bring the DNA together in organised regions. There are many different protein components of these scaffolds, amongst them DNA topoisomerases.


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Introduction

This is the fifth and final unit in the MSXR209 series on mathematical modelling. In this unit we revisit the model developed in the first unit of this series on pollution in the Great Lakes of North America. Here we evaluate and revise the original model by comparing its predictions against data from the lakes before finally reflecting on the techniques used.

This unit, the fifth in a series of five, builds on ideas developed and introduced in Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes
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Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the legal framework of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and Regulations associated with it

  • understand the employers’, employees’ and visitors’ duties

  • evaluate hazards and risks in order to carry out a risk assessment

  • understand the legal requirement to report any accident or dangerous occurrence

  • develop risk assessments for scientific laborat
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Cornerstones: Irish Americans
WGTE Preview: They came for the opportunity. They stayed because they had made a home for themselves and their families. The Irish provided a crucial cornerstone in the building of Toledo.  Video is of good quality and good for middle elementary and middle school students. (01:19)
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The DPS protein compacts the eubacterial chromosome during stress

When an E. coli cell enters into stationary phase, transcription and cell division cease completely. In such cells, the normal chromatin components, such as those described above, are replaced by a negatively charged protein called DPS. The interaction between DPS and DNA appears to be a specialised bacterial adaptation to survive starvation. In normal conditions of growth, the DNA within the bacterial cell is distributed evenly throughout the entire cytoplasm. In stationary cells, how
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Zan Barry, MIT Community Wellness
Zan Barry talks about the holistic techniques and trainings for stress management and well-being offered by MIT Community Wellness.
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Tell the time
Ask and pay for goods and services
Understand and give directions in a building
Understand what is and is not allowed
Identify and use dates
Use expressions of time