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3.6.6 Teach to learn

One of the most successful ways to learn something well is to teach it. Select a topic that you feel you know well and try teaching it to an imaginary person. As your teaching proceeds, you will quickly realise where there are gaps in your knowledge and understanding. Immediately you will begin to identify clearly what it is you are explaining. You will become aware of any aspects that you are less clear about, and can focus on those. Imagine you are explaining something to someone who keenly
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3.1.2 Identifying the stages of revision

Although you will eventually develop your own particular approach to revision, it is valuable to reflect a little on the stages you might go through in preparing for your next exam. To do this, we suggest that you adopt a technique called mind-mapping.

Mind-mapping can be used to collect and organise ideas at any time during your studies. Some people have the kind of memory that uses visual cues very effectively, and mind-mapping taps into this memory style. It enables you to lay out yo
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • manage time more effectively when revising and in the exam itself

  • learn, or brush up on, revision and exam skills

  • feel equipped to approach exams with less anxiety and stress.


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References

Entwistle, N. (1997) ‘Contrasting perspectives on learning’ in Marton, F., Hounsell, D. and Entwistle, N. (eds) The Experience of Learning: Implications for teaching and studying in Higher Education, Edinburgh, Scottish Academic Press Limited.
Marton, F. and R. Saljo (1997) ‘Approaches to learning’ in Marton, F., Hounsell, D. and Entwistle, N. (eds) The Experience of Learning: Implications for teachi
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4.1 Underlining and highlighting

To be able to make sense of what you are reading, you need to read actively. One method that can help is to use a pen.

Activity 2

Did you underline or highlight any words as you read the Layard article? If not
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3.2 Reading to learn

In order to learn you need to follow the argument as you read. With an important text, you should slow right down and take it bit by bit. Here is a student describing how he tackled a particularly challenging chapter:

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6.2.1 Using a sales website

A visitor to a sales website is usually able to:

  • browse through the details of the goods for sale;

  • search for a particular product;

  • check on the availability of goods;

  • read reviews of the products by other purchasers;

  • register to receive newsletters which detail new items of interest;

  • buy products using credit or debit cards, and in some cases, other payment methods such as cheq
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Conclusion

This free course, The importance of interpersonal skills, provided an introduction to interpersonal skills, which are included in studies of Business & Management. You considered how the content, language and medium of the message being communicated, as well as the relationship you have with the person who is receiving your message, can impact interpersonal interactions. You also looked at the three basic ego states proposed by Eric Berne and how these are adopted in interactions. Fina
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4 Case study: Kiran's story

In the case study below you will read about Kiran, whose role change at work impacts on the interpersonal communication she has with her team.

The first six months have just flown by. I've really enjoyed working with the two or three schools that I chose following my conversation with my friend who
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7.3 Frequency tables

So far you have looked at small sets of data, which are relatively easy to analyse. Naturally, this is not always the case and you need to consider how to work with a larger set of data. Data set B shows 30 TMA scores recorded by a tutor in the order that the scripts were marked.

Data set B:

86 78 93 <
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Introduction

Social scientists collect evidence to support their claims and theories in different ways. Such evidence is crucial to the practice of social science and to the production of social scientific knowledge.

You may be aware of the idea of active reading, which is about reading with the aim of understanding and grasping something: a definition, an argument, a piece of evidence. What that suggests is that active reading is about reading and thinking at the same time. In
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Cognitive Psychology
The consciousness of the human mind has long been a topic of fascination and curiosity amongst writers, artists and psychologists, from Carl Jung and Salvador Dali to Virginia Wolfe and Gertrude Stein. This album explores our understanding of consciousness, and features a discussion on some of psychology's most complex questions: what does it mean to be a conscious human, and what purposes our consciousness serves. This material forms part of The Open University course DD303 Cognitive psychology
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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Content

If we look specifically at OpenLearn free courses, the content comprises both the course (structured self-study resources) as well as the individual assets that make up a course.

The assets of a course are the materials such as text, images, animations, audio clips, etc., which are likely to be in different digital formats. In some cases a course will consist of just one asset, but most contain a variety.

As the number of OpenLearn free courses grows, so does the variety available
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2 Book reviews

The comments below all relate to the same book, Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech, and have been made by pupils at Churchill Community School, North Somerset – the ‘Churchill Chatterboxes’.

A captivating yet far-fetched book, I feel this would suit most younger readers but older readers would want something more demanding. (Margaret)

I think Ruby Holler is a very moving book, especially when Da
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4.1 Geography as a medium of education

Geography is what geographers do.

(Anon)

Aren't we all geographers now?

(Buttimer, 2004)

Define history. Now define geography

(Gritzner, 2004)

Charles Gritzner supplies us with one of t
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • open up and ‘map’ geography and the ways the subject is understood (and sometimes misunderstood)

  • examine ways in which the subject is under pressure – especially with regard to the ‘chasm’ that is said to exist between university and school geography

  • establish reasons why the subject is important in relation to topical debates about sustainable development and citizenship

  • ev
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Acknowledgements

Amanda Burrows is a graduate of Laban and gained an MA in Education from The Open University. She has taught dance in secondary schools, FE colleges, universities and in community settings. Amanda is currently Head of Curriculum for Visual, Performing Arts and Media at Grantham College, and has produced materials for the Open Univerity's Teachandlearn.net, repurposed here for openlearn.

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4 Performance skills

Performance skills are those aspects that set dancing apart from mechanical movement. Often, our attention is drawn to the dancer who is using a range of performance skills effectively, because they stand out from the rest.

Performance skills are aspects such as:

  • focus;

  • projection;

  • musicality;

  • timing;

  • emphasis;

  • expression.

All of these aspects are connected
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3.6 Léxico básico


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ayuntamiento (el)town hall
escuela (la)school
hospital (el)hospital
oficina de turismo (la)tourist office
palacio (el)palace
polideportivo (el)sports centre
puente (el)