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1.7 How old is coal?
During the Indistrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we input more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this unit it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.6 Impurities in coal
During the Indistrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we input more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this unit it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

1.5 The physics and chemistry of coal formation
During the Indistrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we input more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this unit it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

1.4 Coal-forming environments in the geological record
During the Indistrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we input more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this unit it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

1.3 Coal-forming environments today
During the Indistrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we input more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this unit it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

1.2 The origins of coal
During the Indistrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we input more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this unit it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Introduction
During the Indistrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we input more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this unit it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Learning outcomes
During the Indistrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we input more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this unit it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

London Business School: Looking back over 2009 and forward to 2010
London Business School faculty members offer you their insights on what lies ahead for 2010 plus we share highlights of the past year at London Business School.

Participatory development inaction
A brief introduction to this album.
Author(s): No creator set

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A brief history of the future
Professor John Naughton of The Open University reveals some of the key players in the history of the internet, and explores some of the surprises it has sprung.
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The method of research into animals living on the Galapagos
The research process involved in the study of marine iguanas and giant tortoises in the Galapagos.
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Water in urban Ethiopia
Life in the Ethiopian town of Bahir Dar is somewhat different from rural life we see in track 2 'Water in rural Ethiopia'. With a direct water pipe to her house, Mulugojam Tegegne and her family enjoy a relatively comfortable life.
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Jumping at Every Opportunity
Hodson-Gilliam Success Scholar Ashela Bean takes advantage of every opportunity to learn and conduct research in the public health field.
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Jumping at Every Opportunity
Hodson-Gilliam Success Scholar Ashela Bean takes advantage of every opportunity to learn and conduct research in the public health field.
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A Legacy of Opportunity: Scholarship support at Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University scholarship recipients talk about how financial support has changed their lives and how they are giving back to the community.
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A Legacy of Opportunity: Scholarship support at Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University scholarship recipients talk about how financial support has changed their lives and how they are giving back to the community.
Author(s): No creator set

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Back Pain and its Management: Myths and Misconceptions
Dr. Shane Burch discusses innovative developments for back and spine care. Series: UCSF Mini Medical School for the Public [8/2010] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 18539]
Author(s): UCtelevision

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Rights not set

Back Pain and its Management: Myths and Misconceptions
Dr. Shane Burch discusses innovative developments for back and spine care. Series: UCSF Mini Medical School for the Public [8/2010] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 18539]
Author(s): UCtelevision

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Rights not set

UTMatters - UT Gives Back: Everyone can do something
Recent University of Toledo medical school graduate Patrick Clements tells his story about giving back to the community through medical missions and offers advice to help other students who want to explore student service opportunities through UT.
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