Your Big Data Action Plan
With the magnitude of data available and our growing capability to process it, big data has become an asset class that has spawned an entire industry. How should you be positioned to take advantage of it?
Author(s): Bruno Lanvin, Executive Director of the INSEAD Eur

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Understanding cancer: News from the frontline
This Oxford at Said seminar was dedicated to cancer research. Three researchers from the University of Oxford give insights into recent advances in the field of cancer cell biology, therapy and epidemiology. One in three people develop cancer, and one in five in Europe and North America die of the disease. Although environmental and lifestyle factors, for example smoking or sun exposure, affect the incidence of some cancer types, all human populations and many types of animal suffer from this di
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2.4 Obesity and brain reward systems

Very palatable foods, especially those high in fat and carbohydrate may be potent stimuli for neural pathways in the brain. Direct evidence for this idea has been found in recent studies of non-human animals. For example, it is known that many types of both natural (i.e. food, sex) and drug (e.g. cocaine or amphetamine, opiates, nicotine) rewards are able to stimulate activity within a brain pathway that innervates the ventral striatum at the base of the forebrain (Figure 8). The nerve cells
Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

6.1 Introduction
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Diffusion Across a Sheep Red Blood Cell Membrane
This cell membrane physiology laboratory uses sheep red blood cells to determine: (1) the isotonic and hemolytic molar concentrations of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes, and degree of electrolyte dissociation; (2) the diffusion rate of penetrating molecules of varying size and lipid solubility; and (3) the relationship of molecular size, number of hydroxyl groups, and partition coefficient to diffusion rate. Student research teams then design an experiment using the acquired techniques to deter
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Boudreaux on Monetary Misunderstandings
Don Boudreaux of George Mason University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts on some of the common misunderstandings people have about prices, money, inflation and deflation. They discuss what is harmful about inflation and deflation, the importance of expectations and the implications for interest rates and financial institutions.
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Moore's Law Forever?
In 1965, Gordon Moore observed that the number of transistors on a silicon chip doubled every technology generation (12 months at that time, currently 18-24 months). He predicted that this trend would continue for a while. Forty years later, Moore's Law continues to hold. Since the number of transistors in a circuit is a measure of the circuit's computational power, the doubling of transistor counts compounded over a 40 year period has led to an enormous increase in the performance of electronic
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MacRetina
MacRetina simulates data from retinal ganglion cells in the eye to the brain. By sampling neural activity while stimulating the retina with small spots of light, students can see the dynamic excitatory and inhibitory responses of these neurons in the simulation, and map the organization of the retinal region that drives the cell's receptive field. MacRetina is modeled accurately on published data and is a realistic simulation of a lab experiment that would otherwise be beyond the reach of the
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1. Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetics (February 13, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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2. Policy, Law and Society (February 20, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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3. New Research Direction (February 27, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
Author(s): No creator set

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4. Towards the Clinic - Stem Cell (March 5, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
Author(s): No creator set

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5. The New Ethics of Stem Cell Research (March 12, 2008)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
Author(s): No creator set

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1. Cell Biology, Genetics, Embryology (June 25, 2007)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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2. Five Important Research Advances (July 2, 2007)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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3. Five Clinical Advances (July 9, 2007)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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4. The Ethics of Stem Cell Research (July 16, 2007)
Stem cell, medicine, health, disease, science, technology, research, clinical advances, controversy, ethics, law, society, politics, economics, social issue, religion, plasma, cytoplasm, nucleus, white blood cell, chromosome, gene expression, DNA, central
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The Future of Medicine: Thinking Small
The use of nanobiotechnology in medicine is termed “nanomedicine.” Dr. Maysinger will discuss current advances in nanomedicine research, including targeted cancer therapies, localized drug delivery, and improved cell-material interactions for imaging of brain cells.
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Bonding With Bugs
Nathalie Tufenkji (Department of Chemical Engineering) discusses her work aimed at preventing binding of infectious organisms to medical devices and to mammalian cell surfaces using an active component of cranberries.
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2.2 Winning coal in former times

Coal was probably first used as a fuel by early Chinese civilizations, and there is evidence for coal working in the UK since Roman times. However, early approaches to mining were limited by the available technology, and left much of the coal behind.

At first, coal was dug from seams exposed at the surface in shallow excavations into valley sides that followed the coal seam. The amount of coal that could be extracted from these trenches and from adits (short horizontal tunnels) w
Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University