Who is the consumer? Who is the reader?
Who is the consumer? Who is the reader? - Cui Su Keywords:remix , epub , consumer , reader
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Older SQL lectures
Older SQL lectures - Kenneth Thomas Keywords:UNSPECIFIED
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The Science of Good Cooking | Lecture 10 (2012)
Jack Bishop, Editorial Director at Cook's Illustrated and an Editor on The Science of Good Cooking Dan Souza, Associate Editor of Cook's Illustrated
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Big Data @ CSAIL

In this talk, Prof. Madden will summarize recent work at MIT CSAIL in the big data area, including recent work on data management, cloud computing, algorithms, and interfaces and visualization.


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2.1 Finding and extracting coal

Coal is often regarded as the principal fossil fuel, and with good reason. There is almost three times more energy available from the global proven coal reserves as there is from proven oil and gas reserves taken together. Therefore, it is unsurprising that even today much time and effort is spent locating it.

This section considers the techniques used in coal exploration and how coal is produced from surface and underground mines. But first, a brief look at a few of the historical aspe
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1.7.1 Carboniferous mires

During the late Carboniferous, mires developed over vast areas of the UK. Much of today's land area was an extensive, low-lying plain bordering a sea to the south (a sea that was soon to be the site of a mountain-building episode). Any mountains that existed lay hundreds of kilometres to the north. Large river systems meandered southwards across these plains.

At that time, the UK lay in tropical latitudes, almost on the Equator (see Author(s): The Open University

1.7 How old is coal?

Not surprisingly, the distribution of coal deposits through time corresponds closely to the origin and distribution of land plants. (This is discussed further in Section 4.) Coals are commonly found in rocks from Carboniferous times onwards, Devonian coals are rare, and pre-Silurian true coals are never found. This coincides with evidence for the evolution of land plants, which first appeared in Silurian times about 400 Ma (million years) ago, colonized the land surface rapidly through the De
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1 Observing the Moon

Activity 1

0 hours 30 minutes

Try to make out features on the surface of the Moon, even if you have no optical aid available. If you have the use of a pair of binoculars you will probably
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2.3 The irreversible Universe

‘Science owes more to the steam engine than the steam engine owes to Science.’

L.J. Henderson (1917)

From the time of Newton until the end of the nineteenth century the development of physics consisted essentially of the refinement and extension of the mechanical view of the Universe. There were many stages in this process but one of the most interesting came towards its end with the re
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7.6 Synaptogenesis

The formation of synaptic connections is an essential property of nervous system development. Synapses are formed between neurons and also with targets that are not part of the nervous system, e.g. muscle. Axon terminals, under the direction of a variety of extracellular cues, grow towards particular targets. Once they arrive at the target, they stop growing and the growth cone changes to form a synapse. As with axon growth, the formation of the synapse is dependent on an interaction between
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AP Chemistry: Bonding MC Question Practice

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde